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Articles by Kristen Humphrey in JoVE

 JoVE General

Optimized Staining and Proliferation Modeling Methods for Cell Division Monitoring using Cell Tracking Dyes

1Department of Flow and Image Cytometry, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, 2Flow Cytometry & Cell Sorting Resource Laboratory, University of Pennsylvania, 3SciGro, Inc., 4Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Pennsylvania


JoVE 4287

Successful use of cell tracking dyes to monitor immune cell function and proliferation involves several critical steps. We describe methods for: 1) obtaining bright, uniform, reproducible label-ing with membrane dyes; 2) selecting fluorochromes and data acquisition conditions; and 3) choosing a model to quantify cell proliferation based on dye dilution.

Other articles by Kristen Humphrey on PubMed

Image Cytometry-based Detection of Aneuploidy by Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization in Suspension

Cytogenetic abnormalities are important diagnostic and prognostic criteria for hematologic malignancies. Karyotyping and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) are the conventional methods by which these abnormalities are detected. The sensitivity of these microscopy-based methods is limited by the abundance of the abnormal cells in the samples and therefore these analyses are commonly not applicable to minimal residual disease (MRD) stages. A flow cytometry-based imaging approach was developed to detect chromosomal abnormalities following FISH in suspension (FISH-IS), which enables the automated analysis of several log-magnitude higher number of cells compared with the microscopy-based approaches. This study demonstrates the applicability of FISH-IS for detecting numerical chromosome aberrations, establishes accuracy, and sensitivity of detection compared with conventional FISH, and feasibility to study procured clinical samples of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Male and female healthy donor peripheral blood mononuclear cells hybridized with combinations of chromosome enumeration probes (CEP) 8, X, and Y served as models for disomy, monosomy, and trisomy. The sensitivity of detection of monosomies and trisomies amongst 20,000 analyzed cells was determined to be 1% with a high level of precision. A high correlation (R(2) = 0.99) with conventional FISH analysis was found based on the parallel analysis of diagnostic samples procured from 10 AML patients with trisomy 8 (+8). Additionally, FISH-IS analysis of samples procured at the time of clinical remission demonstrated the presence of residual +8 cells indicating that this approach may be used to detect MRD and associated chromosomal defects.

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