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Articles by Sandeep Sharma in JoVE

 JoVE Neuroscience

Relação progressiva Respondendo para Alimentos gordurosos e High-açúcar Palatable em Ratos

1CRCHUM and the Montreal Diabetes Research Center, University of Montreal


JoVE 3754

Os detalhes do relatório apresentam o protocolo utilizado para medir os efeitos de recompensa do alto teor de gordura de alimentos em ratos usando uma progressiva relação tarefa de condicionamento operante.

Other articles by Sandeep Sharma on PubMed

A Study on the Effect of Different Chemical Routes on Functionalization of MWCNTs by Various Groups (-COOH, -SO3H, -PO3H2)

ABSTRACT: Pristine multiwall carbon nanotubes [MWCNTs] have been functionalized with various groups (-COOH, -SO3H, -PO3H2) using different single- and double-step chemical routes. Various chemical treatments were given to MWCNTs using hydrochloric, nitric, phosphoric, and sulphuric acids, followed by a microwave treatment. The effect of the various chemical treatments and the dispersion using a surfactant via ultrasonication on the functionalization of MWCNTs has been studied. The results obtained have been compared with pristine MWCNTs. Scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray [EDX] spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy confirm the dispersion and functionalization of MWCNTs. Their extent of functionalization with -SO3H and -PO3H2 groups from the EDX spectra has been observed to be higher for the samples functionalized with a double-step chemical route and a single-step chemical route, respectively. The ID/IG ratio calculated from Raman data shows a maximum defect concentration for the sample functionalized with the single-step chemical treatment using nitric acid. The dispersion of MWCNTs with the surfactant, Triton X-100, via ultrasonication helps in their unbundling, but the extent of functionalization mainly depends on the chemical route followed for their treatment. The functionalized carbon nanotubes can be used in proton conducting membranes for fuel cells.

Highly Sensitive Method for the Determination of JI-101, a Multi-kinase Inhibitor in Human Plasma and Urine by LC-MS/MS-ESI: Method Validation and Application to a Clinical Pharmacokinetic Study

A highly sensitive, rapid assay method has been developed and validated for the estimation of JI-101 in human plasma and urine using LC-MS/MS-ESI in the positive-ion mode. The assay procedure involves extraction of JI-101 and alfuzosin (internal standard, IS) from human plasma/urine with a solid-phase extraction process. Chromatographic resolution was achieved on two Zorbax SB-C(18) columns connected in series with a PEEK coupler using an isocratic mobile phase comprising acetonitrile-0.1% formic acid in water (70:30, v/v). The total run time was 2.0 min. The MS/MS ion transitions monitored were 466.20 → 265.10 for JI-101 and 390.40 → 156.10 for IS. The method was subjected to rigorous validation procedures to cover the following: selectivity, sensitivity, matrix effect, recovery, precision, accuracy, stability and dilution effect. In both matrices the lower limit of quantitation was 10.0 ng/mL and the linearity range extended from ~10.0 to 1508 ng/mL in plasma or urine. The intra- and inter-day precisions were in the ranges 1.57-14.5 and 6.02-12.4% in plasma and 0.97-15.7 and 8.66-10.2% in urine. This method has been successfully applied for the characterization of JI-101 pharmacokinetics in cancer patients.

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