When Scientists Get #OverlyHonest

OverlyHonestMethods

This is a guest post by Adam Ruben, PhD—molecular biologist, television host on the Discovery Channel’s “Outrageous Acts of Science,” and author of the book “Surviving Your Stupid, Stupid Decision to Go to Grad School.” The opinions expressed are his own. 

Like One Direction, light-up shoes, and every Transformers movie, Twitter hashtags are for 13-year olds. But one hashtag in particular recently caught the attention of adult scientists, and it’s a funny one: #OverlyHonestResearchMethods. Read more…

Why Editors of Scientific Publications Go Insane

JoVE Cartoon Angry Internet Comments

By Adam Ruben, PhD—molecular biologist, television host on the Discovery Channel’s “Outrageous Acts of Science,” and author of the book “Surviving Your Stupid, Stupid Decision to Go to Grad School.”

There are only two sure things in this world: death, and the bile-filled lawlessness of internet Comments sections. For every innocuous scientific article, there are thousands of people with nothing better to do than upload their wacked-out opinions, call each other trolls, and peddle cheap Viagra that doesn’t even work. (I’m told.) Read more…

Bioengineering’s New Best Friend: 2D & 3D Printing (Editor’s Picks!)

3D Printing

Fascinated by 3D printing? In this Editor’s Picks collection, Eric Veien, Ph.D., a science editor for our Bioengineering section, discusses four novel experimental techniques in 3D & 2D bioprinting technology.

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Dr. Eric Veien

Dr. Veien: The use of “printing” techniques for biological applications has been increasing in recent years, and is seen as having wide applicability and great potential in bioengineering. Various techniques can be used to print biological substrates, print live cells onto substrates, and to print 3-D scaffolds or entire organs that can be implanted inside living organisms. Interested in learning—seeing—a bit more about this emerging technology? Below are some examples of printing techniques that have been published in JoVE.

Enjoy!

Read more…

April Fools! Tricks to Play on Unsuspecting Scientists in the Lab

JoVE April Fools' Day

By Adam Ruben, Ph.D.—molecular biologist, television host on the Discovery Channel’s “Outrageous Acts of Science” and author of the book “Surviving Your Stupid, Stupid Decision to Go to Grad School.”

Being stuck in the lab on April Fool’s Day doesn’t mean you can’t have a little fun.  This year, bring some humor to your scientific workplace with these simple, hilarious, morally questionable pranks. Read more…

Editor’s Picks! The Future of Cancer Treatment

Nanoparticles

In this exciting Editor’s Picks collection, our Science Editor, Dr. Jaydev Upponi, offers a glimpse into the world of nanoparticles—the novel delivery system of anti-cancer therapeutics. 

Jaydev Upponi, PhD.

Jaydev Upponi, PhD.

Dr. Upponi: Currently, there is a new variety of chemotherapeutic agents available to treat cancer. These chemotherapeutic agents pose potential disadvantages, such as toxicity to normal cells and premature drug degradation owing to their poor solubility.

To overcome these limitations, scientists must solubilize and increase the amount of an anti-cancer drug at the area of concern and reduce the toxicity to normal cells. This is achieved by embedding drugs into what are called nanoparticles.

Prepared using various polymers, a variety of these novel drug delivery systems are currently being used (to name a few, there are synthetic polymers, microcapsules, cell ghosts, lipoproteins, liposome and micelles). Read more…

Green With Envy: When Your Friends All Have Jobs & You’re Still in Grad School

220px-Irish_clover

Happy St. Patrick’s Day! This is a guest post by Adam Ruben, PhD—molecular biologist, television host on the Discovery Channel’s “Outrageous Acts of Science,” and author of the book “Surviving Your Stupid, Stupid Decision to Go to Grad School.”

You thought you were so smart. You picked the lab with the brilliant, dynamic PI who’s always jetting off to conferences in faraway lands. Now, eight years later, you’re e-mailing the twelfth draft of your dissertation to an adviser you haven’t seen since last summer, hoping to receive more than an automated out-of-office message in response. Cobwebs surround your desk, your thesis committee has forgotten your name, and undergrads have begun to mistake you for a Professor Emeritus. Read more…

Editor’s Picks! The Trouble With Fieldwork

High-throughput Fluorometric Measurement of Potential Soil Extracellular Enzyme Activities

This week, associate editor, Nita Vaidya, shares 4 of her favorite videos from JoVE’s Environment section. 

Nita Vaidya

Nita Vaidya

Vaidya: Something that really gets to me about fieldwork is that it’s hard to control for things. You don’t know what the environment is going to do. I was working when hurricane sandy happened doing groundwater and surface water testing, and a bunch of our samples got messed up because the rivers flooded. It’s a good idea to standardize methods in this field since so much can go wrong. Creating a video about a method provides some control—so people can see how the method is performed and use it correctly.

 

Read more…