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Adhesins, Bacterial: Cell-surface components or appendages of bacteria that facilitate adhesion (Bacterial adhesion) to other cells or to inanimate surfaces. Most fimbriae (Fimbriae, Bacterial) of gram-negative bacteria function as adhesins, but in many cases it is a minor subunit protein at the tip of the fimbriae that is the actual adhesin. In gram-positive bacteria, a protein or polysaccharide surface layer serves as the specific adhesin. What is sometimes called polymeric adhesin (Biofilms) is distinct from protein adhesin.
 JoVE In-Press

A New Method for Qualitative Multiscale Analysis of Bacterial Biofilms on Filamentous Fungal Colonies Using Confocal and Electron Microscopy

1Interactions Arbres – Microorganismes, UMR1136, INRA Université de Lorraine, 2Biosciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 3Ecologie et Ecophysiologie Forestuère, UMR 1137, INRA Université de Lorraine

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JoVE 54771

 JoVE Bioengineering

Engineering Adherent Bacteria by Creating a Single Synthetic Curli Operon

1UMR CNRS 5557 Ecologie Microbienne, Université Lyon 1, Université de Lyon, 2Département Biosciences, INSA de Lyon, Université de Lyon, 3INSERM U758, Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, Université de Lyon, 4Laboratoire de Génie Civil et Ingénierie Environnementale, INSA de Lyon, Université de Lyon


JoVE 4176

 Science Education: Essentials of Biochemistry

Photometric Protein Determination

JoVE Science Education

Measuring the concentration is a fundamental step of many biochemical assays. Photometric protein determination takes advantage of the fact that the more a sample contains light-absorbing substances, the less the light will transmit through it. Since the relationship between concentration and absorption is linear, this phenomenon can be used to measure the concentration in samples where it is unknown. This video describes the basics of photometric protein determination and introduces the Bradford Assay and the Lowry Method. The procedure in the video will cover a typical Bradford assay. Applications covered include direct measurement of very small volumes of nucleic acids to characterize concentration and purity, determination of coupling efficiency of a biomimetic material, and another variation of photometric protein determination using Remazol dye. Determining the concentration of a protein in samples is a fundamental step in many biochemical assays. Photometric determination can be done with small sample sizes. The more a sample contains light-absorbing substances, the less the light will transmit through it. This provides a quantitative measurement of the absorbing substances. These concepts are so fundamental to science that the articles that introduced two of the techniques are in the three most cited papers of

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 Science Education: Essentials of Environmental Microbiology

Bacterial Growth Curve Analysis and its Environmental Applications

JoVE Science Education

Source: Laboratories of Dr. Ian Pepper and Dr. Charles Gerba - Arizona University
Demonstrating Author: Luisa Ikner

Bacteria are among the most abundant life forms on Earth. They are found in every ecosystem and are vital for everyday life. For example, bacteria affect what people eat, drink, and breathe, and there are actually more bacterial cells within a person’s body than mammalian cells. Because of the importance of bacteria, it is preferable to study particular species of bacteria in the laboratory. To do this, bacteria are grown under controlled conditions in pure culture, meaning that only one type of bacterium is under consideration. Bacteria grow quickly in pure culture, and cell numbers increase dramatically in a short period of time. By measuring the rate of cell population increase over time, a “growth curve” to be developed. This is important when aiming to utilize or inoculate known numbers of the bacterial isolate, for example to enhance plant growth, increase biodegradation of toxic organics, or produce antibiotics or other natural products at an industrial scale.

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 JoVE Immunology and Infection

Monitoring Changes in Membrane Polarity, Membrane Integrity, and Intracellular Ion Concentrations in Streptococcus pneumoniae Using Fluorescent Dyes

1Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, 2Witebsky Center for Microbial Pathogenesis and Immunology, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, 3New York State Center of Excellence in Bioinformatics and Life Sciences, University at Buffalo, State University of New York


JoVE 51008

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 JoVE Immunology and Infection

Deciphering and Imaging Pathogenesis and Cording of Mycobacterium abscessus in Zebrafish Embryos

1Dynamique des Interactions Membranaires Normales et Pathologiques, CNRS, UMR 535, Université Montpellier, 2Centre d'études d'agents Pathogènes et Biotechnologies pour la Santé, CNRS, FRE 3689, Université Montpellier, 3Unité de Formation et de Recherche des Sciences de la Santé, EA3647-EPIM, Université Versailles St Quentin


JoVE 53130

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 JoVE Immunology and Infection

Microscopy-based Assays for High-throughput Screening of Host Factors Involved in Brucella Infection of Hela Cells

1Focal Area Infection Biology, Biozentrum, University of Basel, 2Centre d’Immunologie de Marseille-Luminy, Université de la Méditérannée UM2, INSERM U1104 CNRS UM7280, 3Departmento de Microbiologìa and Instituto de Salud Tropical, Universidad de Navarra, 4BioDataAnalysis GmbH


JoVE 54263

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