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 JoVE Biology

A Hybrid DNA Extraction Method for the Qualitative and Quantitative Assessment of Bacterial Communities from Poultry Production Samples

1Egg Safety and Quality Research Unit, USDA-Agricultural Research Service, 2Poultry Microbiological Safety and Processing Research Unit, USDA-Agricultural Research Service, 3Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Oregon State University, 4College of Public Health, University of Georgia, 5Department of Biological Sciences, Center for Microbial Genetics and Genomics, Northern Arizona University


 Science Education: Essentials of Environmental Microbiology

Community DNA Extraction from Bacterial Colonies

JoVE Science Education

Source: Laboratories of Dr. Ian Pepper and Dr. Charles Gerba - Arizona University
Demonstrating Author: Luisa Ikner

Traditional methods of analysis for microbial communities within soils have usually involved either cultural assays utilizing dilution and plating methodology on selective and differential media or direct count assays. Direct counts offer information about the total number of bacteria present, but give no information about the number or diversity of populations present within the community. Plate counts allow enumeration of total cultural or selected cultural populations, and hence provide information on the different populations present. However, since less than 1% of soil bacteria are readily culturable, cultural information offers only a piece of the picture. The actual fraction of the community that can be cultured depends on the medium chosen for cultural counts. Any single medium will select for the populations that are best suited to that particular medium. In recent years, the advantages of studying community DNA extracted from soil samples have become apparent. This nonculture-based approach is thought to be more representative of the actual community present than culture-based approaches. In addition to providing information about the types of populations present, this

 JoVE Biology

Enhanced Reduced Representation Bisulfite Sequencing for Assessment of DNA Methylation at Base Pair Resolution

1Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, 2Institute for Computational Biomedicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, 3Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Weill Cornell Medical College, 4Department of Pathology, University of Michigan


 JoVE Biology

A Practical and Novel Method to Extract Genomic DNA from Blood Collection Kits for Plasma Protein Preservation

1Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Department of Pediatrics, Emory University School of Medicine and Children's Health Care of Atlanta, 2Division of Rheumatology, Department of Pediatrics, Emory University School of Medicine and Children's Health Care of Atlanta


 JoVE Biology

Chromatin Interaction Analysis with Paired-End Tag Sequencing (ChIA-PET) for Mapping Chromatin Interactions and Understanding Transcription Regulation

1Genome Institute of Singapore, Agency for Science, Technology and Research, Singapore, 2A*STAR-Duke-NUS Neuroscience Research Partnership, Singapore, 3Department of Biochemistry, National University of Singapore, Singapore


 JoVE Environment

Automated Gel Size Selection to Improve the Quality of Next-generation Sequencing Libraries Prepared from Environmental Water Samples

1Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, The University of British Columbia, 2Coastal Genomics, 3British Columbia Public Health Microbiology and Reference Laboratory


 JoVE Immunology and Infection

Multiplex PCR Assay for Typing of Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome Mec Types I to V in Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

1Centre for Antimicrobial Resistance, Alberta Health Services / Calgary Laboratory Services / University of Calgary, 2Department of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine, University of Calgary, 3Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Infectious Diseases, University of Calgary, 4Department of Medicine, University of Calgary, 5The Calvin, Phoebe and Joan Snyder Institute for Chronic Diseases, University of Calgary


 JoVE Immunology and Infection

Investigating the Effects of Probiotics on Pneumococcal Colonization Using an In Vitro Adherence Assay

1Pneumococcal Research, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, 2Allergy & Immune Disorders, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, 3Department of Otolaryngology, The University of Melbourne, 4Department of Microbiology & Immunology at the Peter Doherty Institute for Infection & Immunity, The University of Melbourne


 Science Education: Essentials of Environmental Science

Testing For Genetically Modified Foods

JoVE Science Education

Source: Laboratories of Margaret Workman and Kimberly Frye - Depaul University

Genetic modification of foods has been a controversial issue due to debated concerns over health and environmental safety. This experiment demonstrates technical understanding of how food DNA is genetically identified, allowing for educated decision making about the safety and potential dangers of using genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in food supplies. Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) is used to amplify food DNA to test for the presence of genetically modified DNA in food products. Presence of specific DNA bands is detected by using gel electrophoresis to pull extracted food DNA through a 3% agarose gel, a concentration dense enough to separate the bands of DNA containing the genetically modified DNA. Several controls are used in the electrophoresis procedure to ensure DNA is successfully extracted from test foods (plant primer), and to provide known examples of both genetically modified DNA (purchased genetically modified DNA) and non-genetically modified DNA (purchased certified non-GMO food control).

 JoVE Medicine

Working with Human Tissues for Translational Cancer Research

1Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 2Department of Genomic Medicine, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 3Department of Pathology and Institutional Tissue Bank, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center


 JoVE Biology

Methylated DNA Immunoprecipitation

1Department of Cancer Genetics and Developmental Biology, BC Cancer Research Centre, 2Interdisciplinary Oncology Program, University of British Columbia - UBC, 3These authors contributed equally., 4Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of British Columbia - UBC, 5Photography/Video Production, Multi-Media Services, BC Cancer Agency, 6Department of Medical Genetics, Life Sciences Institute,, University of British Columbia - UBC


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