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Drinking Water: Water that is intended to be ingested.
 JoVE Medicine

Adapting Human Videofluoroscopic Swallow Study Methods to Detect and Characterize Dysphagia in Murine Disease Models

1Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, University of Missouri, 2Department of Communication Science and Disorders, University of Missouri, 3Department of Medicine, University of Missouri

JoVE 52319

 JoVE Behavior

Moderate Prenatal Alcohol Exposure and Quantification of Social Behavior in Adult Rats

1Department of Psychology, University of New Mexico, 2Department of Neurosciences, University of New Mexico, 3Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of New Mexico, 4Canadian Centre for Behavioural Neuroscience, University of Lethbridge

JoVE 52407

 JoVE Immunology and Infection

Glass Wool Filters for Concentrating Waterborne Viruses and Agricultural Zoonotic Pathogens

1Wisconsin Water Science Center, United States Geological Survey, 2University of Wisconsin – Madison, 3Agricultural Research Service, United States Department of Agriculture, 4Alaska Science Center, United States Geological Survey

JoVE 3930

 JoVE Medicine

Multimodal Quantitative Phase Imaging with Digital Holographic Microscopy Accurately Assesses Intestinal Inflammation and Epithelial Wound Healing

1Department of Medicine B, University Hospital Münster, 2Institute of Palliative Care, University Hospital Münster, 3Biomedical Technology Center, University of Münster, 4Department of Gastroenterology, Klinikum Bielefeld

JoVE 54460

 JoVE Immunology and Infection

A Modified EPA Method 1623 that Uses Tangential Flow Hollow-fiber Ultrafiltration and Heat Dissociation Steps to Detect Waterborne Cryptosporidium and Giardia spp.

1National Exposure Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, US Environmental Protection Agency, 2Shaw Environmental & Infrastructure, 3Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water, US Environmental Protection Agency

JoVE 4177

 Science Education: Essentials of Environmental Microbiology

Water Quality Analysis via Indicator Organisms

JoVE Science Education

Source: Laboratories of Dr. Ian Pepper and Dr. Charles Gerba - Arizona University
Demonstrating Author: Luisa Ikner

Water quality analysis monitors anthropogenic influences such as pollutants, nutrients, pathogens, and any other constituent that can impact the water’s integrity as a resource. Fecal contamination contributes microbial pathogens that threaten plant, animal, and human health with disease or illness. Increasing water demands and strict quality standards require that water being supplied for human or environmental resources be monitored for low pathogen levels. However, monitoring each pathogen associated with fecal pollution is not feasible, as laboratory techniques involve extensive labor, time, and costs. Therefore, detection for indicator organisms provides a simple, rapid, and cost effective technique to monitor pathogens associated with unsanitary conditions.

 JoVE Environment

Removal of Trace Elements by Cupric Oxide Nanoparticles from Uranium In Situ Recovery Bleed Water and Its Effect on Cell Viability

1Division of Physical Therapy, Department of Orthopedics & Rehabilitation, University of New Mexico, 2Department of Ecosystem Science and Management, University of Wyoming, 3School of Pharmacy, University of Wyoming, 4Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences, Colorado State University, 5Center for Environmental Medicine, Colorado State University, 6College of Pharmacy, California Northstate University

JoVE 52715

 JoVE Chemistry

Quantitative Detection of Trace Explosive Vapors by Programmed Temperature Desorption Gas Chromatography-Electron Capture Detector

1Chemical Sensing & Fuel Technology, Chemistry Division, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, 2NOVA Research, Inc., 3Bio/Analytical Chemistry, Chemistry Division, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, 4Navy Technology Center for Safety and Survivability, Chemistry Division, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory

JoVE 51938

 Science Education: Essentials of Environmental Microbiology

Isolation of Fecal Bacteria from Water Samples by Filtration

JoVE Science Education

Source: Laboratories of Dr. Ian Pepper and Dr. Charles Gerba - Arizona University
Demonstrating Author: Luisa Ikner

The quality of water destined for use in agricultural, recreational, and domestic settings is of great importance due to the potential for outbreaks of waterborne disease. Microbial agents implicated in such events include parasites, bacteria, and viruses that are shed in high numbers in the feces of infected people and animals. Transmission to new and susceptible hosts may then occur via the fecal-oral route upon ingestion of contaminated water. Therefore, the ability to monitor water sources for the presence of pathogenic microorganisms is significant in order to ensure public health. Due to the sheer number and variety of potential fecal-oral pathogens that may be present in water and their variable concentrations, it is impractical and expensive to assay directly for each one of them on a regular basis. Therefore, the microbiological assays for water quality monitoring employ coliform indicator bacteria. Coliforms comprise, in part, the normal intestinal microflora of warm-blooded mammals, are non-pathogenic, and are consistently excreted in the feces. Therefore, the detection of coliform bacteria in water means that a fecal release occurred, and that harmful pathogenic m

 JoVE Biology

Immunofluorescent Detection of Two Thymidine Analogues (CldU and IdU) in Primary Tissue

1Division of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Institute of Diabetes Obesity and Metabolism, Institute for Regenerative Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, University of Pennsylvania-School of Medicine

JoVE 2166

 Science Education: Essentials of Environmental Science

Lead Analysis of Soil Using Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

JoVE Science Education

Source: Laboratories of Margaret Workman and Kimberly Frye - Depaul University

Lead occurs naturally in soil, in levels ranging from 10-50 ppm. However, with the widespread use of lead in paint and gasoline in addition to contamination by industry, urban soils often have concentrations of lead significantly greater than background levels – up to 10,000 ppm in some places. Ongoing problems arise from the fact that lead does not biodegrade, and instead remains in the soil. Serious health risks are associated with lead poisoning, where children are particularly at risk. Millions of children in the U.S. are exposed to soil containing lead. This exposure can cause developmental and behavioral problems in children. These problems include learning disabilities, inattention, delayed growth, and brain damage. The Environmental Protection Agency has set a standard for lead in soil at 400 ppm for play areas and 1,200 ppm for non-play areas. Lead is also of concern in soil, when it’s used for gardening. Plants take up lead from the soil. Therefore, vegetables or herbs grown in contaminated soil can lead to lead poisoning. In addition, contaminated soil particles can be breathed in while gardening or brought into the house on clothing and footwear. It is recommended that s

 Science Education: Essentials of Analytical Chemistry

Calibration Curves

JoVE Science Education

Source: Laboratory of Dr. B. Jill Venton - University of Virginia

Calibration curves are used to understand the instrumental response to an analyte and predict the concentration in an unknown sample. Generally, a set of standard samples are made at various concentrations with a range than includes the unknown of interest and the instrumental response at each concentration is recorded. For more accuracy and to understand the error, the response at each concentration can be repeated so an error bar is obtained. The data are then fit with a function so that unknown concentrations can be predicted. Typically the response is linear, however, a curve can be made with other functions as long as the function is known. The calibration curve can be used to calculate the limit of detection and limit of quantitation. When making solutions for a calibration curve, each solution can be made separately. However, that can take a lot of starting material and be time consuming. Another method for making many different concentrations of a solution is to use serial dilutions. With serial dilutions, a concentrated sample is diluted down in a stepwise manner to make lower concentrations. The next sample is made from the previous dilution, and the dilution factor is often kept constant. The advantage is that only one

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