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October, 2006
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Electrochemistry: The study of chemical changes resulting from electrical action and electrical activity resulting from chemical changes.
 JoVE Engineering

Characterization of Electrode Materials for Lithium Ion and Sodium Ion Batteries Using Synchrotron Radiation Techniques

1Environmental Energy Technologies Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 2Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Chicago, 3Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, 4Haldor Topsøe A/S, 5PolyPlus Battery Company

 JoVE Engineering

In Situ Neutron Powder Diffraction Using Custom-made Lithium-ion Batteries

1School of Chemistry, University of Sydney, 2Institute for Superconducting & Electronic Materials, University of Wollongong, 3Australian Synchrotron, 4Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, 5School of Mechanical, Materials, and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Wollongong, 6School of Chemistry, University of New South Wales

 Science Education: Essentials of Environmental Science

Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

JoVE Science Education

Source: Laboratories of Margaret Workman and Kimberly Frye - Depaul University

The United States consumes a large amount of energy – the current rate is around 97.5 quadrillion BTUs annually. The vast majority (90%) of this energy comes from non-renewable fuel sources. This energy is used for electricity (39%), transportation (28%), industry (22%), and residential/commercial use (11%). As the world has a limited supply of these non-renewable sources, the United States (among others) is expanding the use of renewable energy sources to meet future energy needs. One of these sources is hydrogen. Hydrogen is considered a potential renewable fuel source, because it meets many important criteria: it’s available domestically, it has few harmful pollutants, it’s energy efficient, and it’s easy to harness. While hydrogen is the most abundant element in the universe, it is only found in compound form on Earth. For example, it is combined with oxygen in water as H2O. To be useful as a fuel, it needs to be in the form of H2 gas. Therefore, if hydrogen is to be used as a fuel for cars or other electronics, H2 needs to be made first. Thusly, hydrogen is often called an “energy carrier” rather than a “fuel.”

 JoVE Engineering

Ultrasound Velocity Measurement in a Liquid Metal Electrode

1Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Rochester

 JoVE Engineering

Failure Analysis of Batteries Using Synchrotron-based Hard X-ray Microtomography

1Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California Berkeley, 2Materials Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 3Advanced Light Source Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 4Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of California Berkeley, 5Environmental Energy Technology Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

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