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G1 Phase: The period of the Cell cycle preceding Dna replication in S Phase. Subphases of G1 include "competence" (to respond to growth factors), G1a (entry into G1), G1b (progression), and G1c (assembly). Progression through the G1 subphases is effected by limiting growth factors, nutrients, or inhibitors.
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 Science Education: Essentials of Analytical Chemistry

High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC)

JoVE Science Education

Source: Dr. Paul Bower - Purdue University

High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) is an important analytical method commonly used to separate and quantify components of liquid samples. In this technique, a solution (first phase) is pumped through a column that contains a packing of small porous particles with a second phase bound to the surface. The different solubilities of the sample components in the two phases cause the components to move through the column with different average velocities, thus creating a separation of these components. The pumped solution is called the mobile phase, while the phase in the column is called the stationary phase. There are several modes of liquid chromatography, depending upon the type of stationary and/or mobile phase employed. This experiment uses reversed-phase chromatography, where the stationary phase is non-polar, and the mobile phase is polar. The stationary phase to be employed is C18 hydrocarbon groups bonded to 3-µm silica particles, while the mobile phase is an aqueous buffer with a polar organic modifier (acetonitrile) added to vary its eluting strength. In this form, the silica can be used for samples that are water-soluble, providing a broad range of applications. In this experiment, the mixtures of three components frequently found

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 JoVE Engineering

In Situ Neutron Powder Diffraction Using Custom-made Lithium-ion Batteries

1School of Chemistry, University of Sydney, 2Institute for Superconducting & Electronic Materials, University of Wollongong, 3Australian Synchrotron, 4Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, 5School of Mechanical, Materials, and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Wollongong, 6School of Chemistry, University of New South Wales


JoVE 52284

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 JoVE Medicine

Multimodal Quantitative Phase Imaging with Digital Holographic Microscopy Accurately Assesses Intestinal Inflammation and Epithelial Wound Healing

1Department of Medicine B, University Hospital Münster, 2Institute of Palliative Care, University Hospital Münster, 3Biomedical Technology Center, University of Münster, 4Department of Gastroenterology, Klinikum Bielefeld


JoVE 54460

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 JoVE Cancer Research

Establishment of Cancer Stem Cell Cultures from Human Conventional Osteosarcoma

1Department of Surgery and Translational Medicine (DCMT), University of Florence, 2Neurofarba Department, University of Florence, 3Department of Traumatology and General Orthopedics, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Careggi


JoVE 53884

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 JoVE Bioengineering

Quantitative Optical Microscopy: Measurement of Cellular Biophysical Features with a Standard Optical Microscope

1Department of Biomedical Engineering, Oregon Health & Science University, School of Medicine, 2Department of Dermatology, Oregon Health & Science University, School of Medicine, 3Department of Cell & Developmental Biology, Division of Hematology & Medical Oncology, Knight Cancer Institute, Oregon Health & Science University, School of Medicine


JoVE 50988

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 JoVE Bioengineering

Double Emulsion Generation Using a Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) Co-axial Flow Focus Device

1Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of California, San Francisco, 2Joint UCSF/UCB Bioengineering Graduate Group, University of California, San Francisco, 3Department of Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, 4California Institute for Quantitative Biosciences, University of California, San Francisco


JoVE 53516

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 JoVE Bioengineering

Production and Targeting of Monovalent Quantum Dots

1Department of Otolaryngology, University of California, San Francisco, 2Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, 3Materials Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 4Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of California, San Francisco, 5Tetrad Graduate Program, University of California, San Francisco, 6Center for Systems and Synthetic Biology, University of California, San Francisco, 7Chemistry and Chemical Biology Graduate Program, University of California, San Francisco


JoVE 52198

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 Science Education: Essentials of Environmental Microbiology

Bacterial Growth Curve Analysis and its Environmental Applications

JoVE Science Education

Source: Laboratories of Dr. Ian Pepper and Dr. Charles Gerba - Arizona University
Demonstrating Author: Luisa Ikner

Bacteria are among the most abundant life forms on Earth. They are found in every ecosystem and are vital for everyday life. For example, bacteria affect what people eat, drink, and breathe, and there are actually more bacterial cells within a person’s body than mammalian cells. Because of the importance of bacteria, it is preferable to study particular species of bacteria in the laboratory. To do this, bacteria are grown under controlled conditions in pure culture, meaning that only one type of bacterium is under consideration. Bacteria grow quickly in pure culture, and cell numbers increase dramatically in a short period of time. By measuring the rate of cell population increase over time, a “growth curve” to be developed. This is important when aiming to utilize or inoculate known numbers of the bacterial isolate, for example to enhance plant growth, increase biodegradation of toxic organics, or produce antibiotics or other natural products at an industrial scale.

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