Refine your search:

Containing Text
- - -
Filter by author or institution
Filter by publication date
October, 2006
Filter by section
Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry: A microanalytical technique combining mass spectrometry and gas chromatography for the qualitative as well as quantitative determinations of compounds.
 JoVE Medicine

Quantification of the Immunosuppressant Tacrolimus on Dried Blood Spots Using LC-MS/MS

1iC42 Clinical Research and Development, University of Colorado, Anschutz Medical Campus, 2Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, 3Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Center of Drug Evaluation Research - Office of Generic Drugs, 4Transplant Clinical Research, University of Cincinnati

JoVE 52424

 JoVE Chemistry

Quantitative Detection of Trace Explosive Vapors by Programmed Temperature Desorption Gas Chromatography-Electron Capture Detector

1Chemical Sensing & Fuel Technology, Chemistry Division, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, 2NOVA Research, Inc., 3Bio/Analytical Chemistry, Chemistry Division, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, 4Navy Technology Center for Safety and Survivability, Chemistry Division, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory

JoVE 51938

 JoVE Chemistry

Conducting Miller-Urey Experiments

1School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, 2Earth-Life Science Institute, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 3Institute for Advanced Study, 4Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science Directorate, NASA Johnson Space Center, 5Goddard Center for Astrobiology, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 6Geosciences Research Division, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California at San Diego

JoVE 51039

 JoVE Environment

LC-MS Analysis of Human Platelets as a Platform for Studying Mitochondrial Metabolism

1Center for Cancer Pharmacology, University of Pennsylvania, 2Center for Excellence in Environmental Toxicology, University of Pennsylvania, 3Penn SRP and Department of Systems Pharmacology and Translational Therapeutics, University of Pennsylvania, 4Division of Traumatology, Department of Surgery, Critical Care and Acute Care Surgery, University of Pennsylvania, 5A.J. Drexel Autism Institute, Drexel University

JoVE 53941

 Science Education: Essentials of Analytical Chemistry

Internal Standards

JoVE Science Education

Source: Laboratory of Dr. B. Jill Venton - University of Virginia

The goal of many chemical analyses is a quantitative analysis, where the amount of a substance in a sample is determined. In order to accurately calculate the concentration of an unknown from a sample, careful sample preparation is key. Every time a sample is handled or transferred, some of the sample can be lost. There are strategies however, for minimizing sample loss. There are also strategies for coping with sample loss and still making accurate measurements of concentration. To minimize sample loss, the ideal is to minimize the number of sample handling and transfer steps. For example, massing a solid sample directly into a flask that a solution will be made in reduces a transfer step. If it's necessary to transfer from one flask to another and a dilution is being made, then triple rinsing the glassware helps ensure all the sample is transferred. Other strategies are more specific to the sample. For example, samples that adsorb to glass, such as proteins, might better be handled in polypropylene disposable tubes. The tubes are not hydrophilic, so if a small amount of sample is to be pipetted in water, it is best to have already added the water to the tube, so the sample can be pipetted directly into the solve

 JoVE Chemistry

Characterization, Quantification and Compound-specific Isotopic Analysis of Pyrogenic Carbon Using Benzene Polycarboxylic Acids (BPCA)

1Department of Geography, University of Zurich, 2Department of Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of South Carolina, 3Department of Earth Sciences, ETH Zurich, 4Laboratory of Ion Beam Physics, ETH Zurich, 5Department of Geological Sciences, Stockholm University

JoVE 53922

 Science Education: Essentials of Analytical Chemistry

High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC)

JoVE Science Education

Source: Dr. Paul Bower - Purdue University

High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) is an important analytical method commonly used to separate and quantify components of liquid samples. In this technique, a solution (first phase) is pumped through a column that contains a packing of small porous particles with a second phase bound to the surface. The different solubilities of the sample components in the two phases cause the components to move through the column with different average velocities, thus creating a separation of these components. The pumped solution is called the mobile phase, while the phase in the column is called the stationary phase. There are several modes of liquid chromatography, depending upon the type of stationary and/or mobile phase employed. This experiment uses reversed-phase chromatography, where the stationary phase is non-polar, and the mobile phase is polar. The stationary phase to be employed is C18 hydrocarbon groups bonded to 3-µm silica particles, while the mobile phase is an aqueous buffer with a polar organic modifier (acetonitrile) added to vary its eluting strength. In this form, the silica can be used for samples that are water-soluble, providing a broad range of applications. In this experiment, the mixtures of three components frequently found

 Science Education: Essentials of Analytical Chemistry

Gas Chromatography (GC) with Flame-Ionization Detection

JoVE Science Education

Source: Laboratory of Dr. B. Jill Venton - University of Virginia

Gas chromatography (GC) is used to separate and detect small molecular weight compounds in the gas phase. The sample is either a gas or a liquid that is vaporized in the injection port. Typically, the compounds analyzed are less than 1,000 Da, because it is difficult to vaporize larger compounds. GC is popular for environmental monitoring and industrial applications because it is very reliable and can be run nearly continuously. GC is typically used in applications where small, volatile molecules are detected and with non-aqueous solutions. Liquid chromatography is more popular for measurements in aqueous samples and can be used to study larger molecules, because the molecules do not need to vaporize. GC is favored for nonpolar molecules while LC is more common for separating polar analytes. The mobile phase for gas chromatography is a carrier gas, typically helium because of its low molecular weight and being chemically inert. Pressure is applied and the mobile phase moves the analyte through the column. The separation is accomplished using a column coated with a stationary phase. Open tubular capillary columns are the most popular columns and have the stationary phase coated on the walls of the capillary. Stationary phases a

More Results...
simple hit counter