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Informed Consent: Voluntary authorization, by a patient or research subject, with full comprehension of the risks involved, for diagnostic or investigative procedures, and for medical and surgical treatment.
 JoVE Medicine

Working with Human Tissues for Translational Cancer Research

1Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 2Department of Genomic Medicine, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 3Department of Pathology and Institutional Tissue Bank, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center


JoVE 53189

 JoVE Behavior

Combined Invasive Subcortical and Non-invasive Surface Neurophysiological Recordings for the Assessment of Cognitive and Emotional Functions in Humans

1Institute of Clinical Neuroscience and Medical Psychology, Medical Faculty, Heinrich-Heine-University, 2Department of Neurology, Center for Movement Disorders and Neuromodulation, University Clinic Düsseldorf, 3Department of Neurosurgery, Functional Neurosurgery and Stereotaxy, Center for Movement Disorders and Neuromodulation, University Clinic Düsseldorf


JoVE 53466

 Science Education: Essentials of Experimental Psychology

The Multi-group Experiment

JoVE Science Education

Source: Laboratories of Gary Lewandowski, Dave Strohmetz, and Natalie Ciarocco—Monmouth University

A multi-group design is an experimental design that has 3 or more conditions/groups of the same independent variable. This video demonstrates a multi-group experiment that examines how different interethnic ideologies (multiculturalism and color-blind) influence feelings about diversity and actions toward and out-group member. In providing an overview of how a researcher conducts a multi-group experiment, this video shows viewers how to distinguish levels in variables, common types of conditions/groups to use (including placebo and empty-control conditions/groups), the process of conducting the study, the collection of results, and the consideration of their implications.   

 Science Education: Essentials of Experimental Psychology

The Factorial Experiment

JoVE Science Education

Source: Laboratories of Gary Lewandowski, Dave Strohmetz, and Natalie Ciarocco—Monmouth University

A factorial design is a common type of experiment where there are two or more independent variables. This video demonstrates a 2 x 2 factorial design used to explore how self-awareness and self-esteem may influence the ability to decipher nonverbal signals. This video leads students through the basics of a factorial design including, the nature of a factorial design and what distinguishes it from other designs, the benefits of factorial design, the importance and nature of interactions, main effect and interaction hypotheses, and how to conduct a factorial experiment.

 JoVE In-Press

Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Skeletal Muscle Disease

1Institute of Imaging Science, Vanderbilt University, 2Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Vanderbilt University, 3Department of Biomedical Engineering, Vanderbilt University, 4Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, Vanderbilt University, 5Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Vanderbilt University, 6Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University

Video Coming Soon

JoVE 52352

 Science Education: Essentials of Experimental Psychology

The Simple Experiment: Two-group Design

JoVE Science Education

Source: Laboratories of Gary Lewandowski, Dave Strohmetz, and Natalie Ciarocco—Monmouth University

A two-group design is the simplest way to establish a cause-effect relationship between two variables. This video demonstrates a simple experiment (two-group design).  In providing an overview of how a researcher conducts a simple experiment (two-group design), this video shows viewers the process of turning ideas into testable ideas and forming hypothesis, the identification and effect of experiment variables, the formation of experimental conditions and controls, the process of conducting the study, the collection of results, and the consideration their implications. This research technique is demonstration in the context of answering the research question: “How does physiological arousal/excitement influence perceived attraction?”

 Science Education: Essentials of Experimental Psychology

Experimentation using a Confederate

JoVE Science Education

Source: Laboratories of Gary Lewandowski, Dave Strohmetz, and Natalie Ciarocco—Monmouth University

When orchestrating an experiment, it is important that the experience elicits the most natural reactions from the participants as possible. Researchers accomplish much of this through their creation of the experimental settings. Many research projects focus on interactions between two or more people.  In these situations the environment or setting must often be less natural; often only one person can be a true participant and others in the study need to be “confederates,” that is, allegedly unbiased participants whom, in actuality, act according to the researcher’s directions. This video uses a two-group experiment to see if participants are more likely to imitate a person with more power versus similar power compared to the participant.  The video also highlights the use of research confederates. Psychological studies often use higher sample sizes than studies in other sciences.  A large number of participants helps to better ensure that the population under study is better represented, i.e. the margin of error accompanied by studying human behavior is sufficiently accou

 JoVE Medicine

Human Brown Adipose Tissue Depots Automatically Segmented by Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography and Registered Magnetic Resonance Images

1Chemical and Physical Biology Program, Vanderbilt University, 2Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, 3Radiology & Radiological Sciences, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, 4Department of Pharmacology, Vanderbilt University


JoVE 52415

 JoVE Medicine

Bronchoalveolar Lavage (BAL) for Research; Obtaining Adequate Sample Yield

1Biomedical Research Centre in Microbial Diseases, National Institute for Health Research, 2Respiratory Infection Group, Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University Hospital Trust, 3Respiratory Infection Group, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, 4Institute of Infection and Global Health, University of Liverpool, 5Comprehensive Local Research Network, Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University Hospital Trust, 6Department of Respiratory Research, University Hospital Aintree


JoVE 4345

 JoVE Behavior

Performing Behavioral Tasks in Subjects with Intracranial Electrodes

1Department of Neurosciences, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, 2Epilepsy Center, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, 3Department of Neurosciences and Center for Neurological Restoration, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, 4Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University


JoVE 51947

 Science Education: Essentials of Experimental Psychology

Ethics in Psychology Research

JoVE Science Education

Source: Laboratories of Gary Lewandowski, Dave Strohmetz, and Natalie Ciarocco—Monmouth University

When a researcher finds an interesting topic to study such as aggression, the goal is often to study it in a way that is as true to life as possible. However, researchers must act in an ethical manner.  To do this, they must balance their research goals with the best interests of the participants. Ethics often enter into the planning process when researchers identify all of the ways they can manipulate or measure a variable, but then make their final decision based on how they should manipulate or measure a variable. After receiving a poor grade on a test or paper, a college student may appear to take it out on (i.e., act in an aggressive manner toward) their roommates by being mean or nasty, screaming, throwing things, or even becoming physically violent. Aggression is an important human behavior to study and understand due to the implications it has for interpersonal violence. However, for safety reasons, a study cannot expose participants to the risk that serious types of violence presents. As a result, researchers must identify similar but benign behaviors that can help us understand more aggressive behaviors without harming participants.

 JoVE Immunology and Infection

Isolation of Myeloid Dendritic Cells and Epithelial Cells from Human Thymus

1Department of General Neurology, Hertie Institute for Clinical Brain Research, 2Institute of Pharmacology, University of Bern, 3Department of Immunology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, 4Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, University Clinic Tuebingen, 5Department of Neurology, University Hospital Erlangen


JoVE 50951

 Science Education: Essentials of Experimental Psychology

Self-report vs. Behavioral Measures of Recycling

JoVE Science Education

Source: Laboratories of Gary Lewandowski, Dave Strohmetz, and Natalie Ciarocco—Monmouth University

One of the challenges in measuring an experimental variable is identifying the technique that will produce the more accurate measurement. The most common way to measure a dependent variable is self-report—asking the participant to describe his/her feelings, thoughts, or behaviors. Yet, people may not be honest. To truly know something about a participant, it may be necessary to see what they actually do in a situation. This video uses a multi-group experiment to see if feeling close to others results in more favorable attitudes toward environmental consciousness measured both by self-report and behavioral observation. Psychological studies often use higher sample sizes than studies in other sciences. A large number of participants helps to better ensure that the population under study is better represented, i.e., the margin of error accompanied by studying human behavior is sufficiently accounted for. In this video, we demonstrate this experiment using just one participant. However, as represented in the results, we used a total of 186 participants to reach the experiment’s conclusions.

 Science Education: Essentials of Cognitive Psychology

Prospect Theory

JoVE Science Education

Source: Laboratory of Jonathan Flombaum—Johns Hopkins University

What’s the value of a dollar? Currencies store value to facilitate trade. Implied in any economic transaction is the value of a unit of currency. But what is the subjective value of a dollar? For a long time, economists assumed the answer to this question to be, specifically, that a dollar has a value determined by the market and that the subjective value of a dollar is always that, more or less. Beginning in the early 1970s, experimental psychologists Daniel Kahneman and Amos Tversky upended this assumption, showing that the subjective value of currency depends on a number of factors, most notably, whether losses or gains are being discussed, and the overall size of a transaction. To pump intuition, consider the fact that, to most people, it would seem reasonable to drive an extra half-mile in order to save $2 on a gallon of gas. But very few people would do the same to save $2 on the cost of a new car. So $2 is sometimes, but not always worth an extra half-mile drive. Value is context-dependent. The theory devised by Kahneman and Tversky to describe how people psychologically value currency (and goods and ser

 JoVE Medicine

3D-Neuronavigation In Vivo Through a Patient's Brain During a Spontaneous Migraine Headache

1Headache & Orofacial Pain Effort (H.O.P.E.), Biological & Materials Sciences Department, University of Michigan School of Dentistry, 2Michigan Center for Oral Health Research (MCOHR), University of Michigan School of Dentistry, 3Translational Neuroimaging Laboratory, Molecular & Behavioral Neuroscience Institute, University of Michigan, 4PET Physics Section, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Radiology Department, University of Michigan, 53DLab, University of Michigan, 6Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Michigan


JoVE 50682

 JoVE Behavior

Measurement of Fronto-limbic Activity Using an Emotional Oddball Task in Children with Familial High Risk for Schizophrenia

1Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, 2Duke-UNC Brain Imaging and Analysis Center, Duke University Medical Center, 3Curriculum in Neurobiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill


JoVE 51484

 JoVE Medicine

Prehospital Thrombolysis: A Manual from Berlin

1Center for Stroke Research Berlin (CSB), Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, 2Klinik und Hochschulambulanz für Neurologie, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, 3Medical School of the Universität Hamburg, Universitätsklinikum Hamburg - Eppendorf, 4Berliner Feuerwehr, 5STEMO-Consortium


JoVE 50534

 JoVE Medicine

Ex Situ Normothermic Machine Perfusion of Donor Livers

1Section of Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Surgery and Liver Transplantation, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, 2Surgical Research Laboratory, Department of Surgery, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, 3Center of Engineering in Medicine/Surgical Services, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, and Shriners Burns Hospital, 4Division of Transplantation, Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School


JoVE 52688

 JoVE Medicine

The Multiple Sclerosis Performance Test (MSPT): An iPad-Based Disability Assessment Tool

1Mellen Center for Multiple Sclerosis Treatment and Research, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, 2Center for Brain Health, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, 3Quantitative Health Sciences, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, 4Department of Biomedical Engineering, Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation


JoVE 51318

 Science Education: Essentials of Experimental Psychology

Pilot Testing

JoVE Science Education

Source: Laboratories of Gary Lewandowski, Dave Strohmetz, and Natalie Ciarocco—Monmouth University

In any experiment researchers have the challenge of creating experiences for participants that are consistent (i.e., reliable) and authentic (i.e., valid). Yet there are many ways to manipulate any one variable. For example, if you want participants to feel sad, you can have them think of their own sad memory, watch a sad video, or read a sad story. Researchers must find the best way to operationalize a psychological construct in order to produce the most effective manipulation possible. Often, before running the main study, researchers will pilot test (i.e., try out) their manipulations to check their effectiveness. This video demonstrates how to operationalize the same independent variable (acute stress) in three different ways. Specifically, this study seeks to identify the best sound (static, ticking clock, or crying baby) to play during a difficult task (solving complex math problems) to optimally manipulate stress. Psychological studies often use higher sample sizes than studies in other sciences. A large number of participants helps to ensure that the population under study is

 Science Education: Essentials of Experimental Psychology

Placebos in Research

JoVE Science Education

Source: Laboratories of Gary Lewandowski, Dave Strohmetz, and Natalie Ciarocco—Monmouth University

Clinical research focuses on the efficacy of treatments for addressing disorders and illnesses. A challenge with this type of research is that participants often have pre-existing beliefs about the treatment, particularly expectations that the treatment will work. Though it has been practiced around the world for centuries, yoga is a relatively recent fitness craze in the United States with a wide range of alleged benefits, including the belief that it improves one’s creativity. However, it is not always clear whether yoga is actually creating the benefits, like improved creativity, or the yoga practitioner’s expectations are really the cause. This video demonstrates a two-group design that examines whether a person who believes he or she is doing yoga (but in reality is not) experiences similar benefits to a person who actually does yoga. Specifically, this study looks at whether there is a placebo effect such that merely believing you are doing yoga benefits creativity.  Psychological studies often use higher sample sizes than studies in other sciences. A large number of participants help

 Science Education: Essentials of Sensation and Perception

Crowding

JoVE Science Education

Source: Laboratory of Jonathan Flombaum—Johns Hopkins University

Human vision depends on light-sensitive neurons that are arranged in the back of the eye on a tissue called the retina. The neurons, called the rods and cones because of their shapes, are not uniformly distributed on the retina. Instead, there is a region in the center of the retina called the macula where cones are densely packed, and especially so in a central sub-region of the macula called the fovea. Outside the fovea there are virtually no cones, and rod density decreases considerably with greater distance from the fovea. Figure 1 schematizes this arrangement. This kind of arrangement is also replicated in the visual cortex: Many more cells represent stimulation at the fovea compared to the periphery. Figure 1. Schematic depiction of the human eye and the distribution of light-sensitive receptor cells on the retina. The pupil is the opening in the front of the eye that allows light to enter. Light is then focused onto the retina, a neural tissue in the back of the eye that is made of rods and cones, light-sensitive cells. At the center of the retina is the macula, and in

 Science Education: Essentials of Neuropsychology

Executive Function in Autism Spectrum Disorder

JoVE Science Education

Source: Laboratories of Jonas T. Kaplan and Sarah I. Gimbel—University of Southern California

Attention, working-memory, planning, impulse control, inhibition, and mental flexibility are important components of human cognition that are often referred to as executive functions. Autism spectrum disorder is a developmental disorder that is characterized by impairments in social interaction, communication, and repetitive behaviors. It is a disorder that lasts a lifetime, and is thought to affect 0.6% of the population. The symptoms of autism suggest a deficit in executive function, which may be assessed by specialized neuropsychological tests. By employing several tests that each emphasize different aspects of executive function, we can gain a more complete picture of the cognitive profile of the disorder. One such task, known as the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), is a cognitively complex task used widely in research and clinical studies as a highly sensitive measure of deficits in executive function. It tests a person's ability to shift attention and tests their flexibility with changing rules and reinforcement.1 In the WCST, a participant is presented with four stimulus cards, incorporating three stimulus parameters: color, shape, and number. The participant is asked to sort

 JoVE In-Press

Measurement of Differentially Methylated INS DNA Species in Human Serum Samples as a Biomarker of Islet β Cell Death

1Department of Pediatrics, IU Center for Diabetes and Metabolic Disease, Indiana University School of Medicine, 2Department of Pediartics, Omaha Children's Hospital and Medical Center, University of Nebraska Medical Center, 3Departments of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Medicine, and Cellular and Integrative Physiology, IU Center for Diabetes and Metabolic Disease, Indiana University School of Medicine, 4Indiana Biosciences Research Institute

Video Coming Soon

JoVE 54838

 Science Education: Essentials of Experimental Psychology

Manipulating an Independent Variable through Embodiment

JoVE Science Education

Source: Laboratories of Gary Lewandowski, Dave Strohmetz, and Natalie Ciarocco—Monmouth University

In any experiment, the researcher attempts to manipulate participants in one group to have different thoughts, experiences, or feelings than the other groups in the study.  Some manipulations are overt, while others can be quite subtle. Embodiment is a growing research area focused on the theory that subtle physical experiences can unconsciously influence a person’s thoughts. For example if a person physically smiles, it often leads to elevated mood. That is, the physical experience of smiling changes the way a person feels. This video uses a two-group experiment to see if the physical sensation of weight will lead people to be stricter by giving harsher forms of discipline to fellow students who violated campus policies. 

 Science Education: Essentials of Sensation and Perception

Spatial Cueing

JoVE Science Education

Source: Laboratory of Jonathan Flombaum—Johns Hopkins University

Attention refers to the limited human ability to select some information for processing at the expense of other stimuli in the environment. Attention operates in all sensory modalities: vision, hearing, touch, even taste and smell. It is most often studied in the visual domain though. A common way to study visual attention is with a spatial cueing paradigm. This paradigm allows researchers to measure the consequences of focusing visual attention in some locations and not others. This paradigm was developed by psychologist Michael Posner in the late 70s and early 80s in a series of papers in which he likened attention to a spotlight, selectively illuminating some portion of a scene.1,2 This video demonstrates standard procedures for a spatial cueing experiment to investigate visual attention.

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