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Listeria monocytogenes: A species of gram-positive, rod-shaped bacteria widely distributed in nature. It has been isolated from sewage, soil, silage, and from feces of healthy animals and man. Infection with this bacterium leads to encephalitis, meningitis, endocarditis, and abortion.
 JoVE Immunology and Infection

Imaging InlC Secretion to Investigate Cellular Infection by the Bacterial Pathogen Listeria monocytogenes

1Unité des Interactions Bactéries Cellules, Pasteur Institute, 2INSERM U604, 3Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique (INRA), USC2020, 4Institute of Biochemistry, ETH Zürich, 5Focal Area Infection Biology, Biozentrum, University of Basel


JoVE 51043

 JoVE Environment

Colorimetric Paper-based Detection of Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp., and Listeria monocytogenes from Large Volumes of Agricultural Water

1Department of Animal Science, University of Wyoming, 2Department of Chemistry, Colorado State University, 3Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences, Colorado State University, 4Department of Animal Sciences, Colorado State University, 5Department of Plant Sciences, University of California, Davis, 6Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Citrus Research and Education Center, University of Florida, 7Department of Food Science and Agricultural Chemistry, McGill University


JoVE 51414

 JoVE Immunology and Infection

Human Placental and Decidual Organ Cultures to Study Infections at the Maternal-fetal Interface

1Benioff Children’s Hospital, 2Department of Pathology, University of California, San Francisco, 3Center for Reproductive Sciences and Department of Obstetrics, University of California, San Francisco, 4Program in Microbial Pathogenesis and Host Defense, University of California, San Francisco, 5Biomedical Sciences Program, University of California, San Francisco


JoVE 54237

 JoVE Immunology and Infection

The Ex Vivo Culture and Pattern Recognition Receptor Stimulation of Mouse Intestinal Organoids

1Department of Biomedical Sciences and Pathobiology, Virginia Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine, Virginia Tech, 2Department of Biomedical Engineering, Cornell University, 3School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Cornell University, 4Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University


JoVE 54033

 JoVE Bioengineering

The Portable Chemical Sterilizer (PCS), D-FENS, and D-FEND ALL: Novel Chlorine Dioxide Decontamination Technologies for the Military

1United States Army-Natick Soldier RD&E Center, Warfighter Directorate, 2Department of Molecular Biology and Biophysics, University of Connecticut Health Center, 3Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 4Children's Hospital Oakland Research Institute


JoVE 4354

 JoVE Medicine

A Preclinical Murine Model of Hepatic Metastases

1Department of Surgery, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 2Department of Oncology, The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 3Department of Surgery, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus


JoVE 51677

 JoVE Bioengineering

Separating Beads and Cells in Multi-channel Microfluidic Devices Using Dielectrophoresis and Laminar Flow

1Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2Micro and Nanotechnology Lab, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 3Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 4Bioengineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign


JoVE 2545

 JoVE Immunology and Infection

Microscopy-based Assays for High-throughput Screening of Host Factors Involved in Brucella Infection of Hela Cells

1Focal Area Infection Biology, Biozentrum, University of Basel, 2Centre d’Immunologie de Marseille-Luminy, Université de la Méditérannée UM2, INSERM U1104 CNRS UM7280, 3Departmento de Microbiologìa and Instituto de Salud Tropical, Universidad de Navarra, 4BioDataAnalysis GmbH


JoVE 54263

 JoVE Immunology and Infection

Deciphering and Imaging Pathogenesis and Cording of Mycobacterium abscessus in Zebrafish Embryos

1Dynamique des Interactions Membranaires Normales et Pathologiques, CNRS, UMR 535, Université Montpellier, 2Centre d'études d'agents Pathogènes et Biotechnologies pour la Santé, CNRS, FRE 3689, Université Montpellier, 3Unité de Formation et de Recherche des Sciences de la Santé, EA3647-EPIM, Université Versailles St Quentin


JoVE 53130

 JoVE Immunology and Infection

In vivo Imaging of Transgenic Leishmania Parasites in a Live Host

1Interdisciplinary Immunology Program, University of Iowa, and the VA Medical Center, 2Department of Biochemistry, University of Iowa, and the VA Medical Center, 3Department of Internal Medicine, University of Iowa, 4Department of Molecular Microbiology, Washington University School of Medicine, 5Division of Dermatology, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Hanley-Hardison Research Center, 6Interdisciplinary Immunology Program, Iowa City VA Medical Center, 7Departments of Internal Medicine, Microbiology and Epidemiology, University of Iowa


JoVE 1980

 Science Education: Essentials of Lab Animal Research

Compound Administration II

JoVE Science Education

Source: Kay Stewart, RVT, RLATG, CMAR; Valerie A. Schroeder, RVT, RLATG. University of Notre Dame, IN

Compound administration is often an integral component of an animal study. Many factors need to be evaluated to ensure that the compound is delivered correctly. The route of administration affects the mechanisms of absorption. The characteristics of the substance to be introduced (the pH, viscosity, and concentration) may dictate which route of administration is selected.1,2,3

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 JoVE Biology

Reconstitution Of β-catenin Degradation In Xenopus Egg Extract

1Department of Cell and Developmental Biology and Program in Developmental Biology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, 2Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology & Nutrition and Division of Developmental Biology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, 3Vanderbilt Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine


JoVE 51425

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Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
 Science Education: Essentials of Environmental Microbiology

Detecting Environmental Microorganisms with the Polymerase Chain Reaction and Gel Electrophoresis

JoVE Science Education

Source: Laboratories of Dr. Ian Pepper and Dr. Charles Gerba - Arizona University
Demonstrating Author: Bradley Schmitz

Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a technique used to detect microorganisms that are present in soil, water, and atmospheric environments. By amplifying specific sections of DNA, PCR can facilitate the detection and identification of target microorganisms down to the species, strain, and serovar/pathovar level. The technique can also be utilized to characterize entire communities of microorganisms in samples. The culturing of microorganisms in the laboratory using specialized growth media is a long-established technique and remains in use for the detection of microorganisms in environmental samples. Many microbes in the natural environment, while alive, maintain low levels of metabolic activity and/or doubling times and are thus referred to as viable but non-culturable (VBNC) organisms. The use of culture-based techniques alone cannot detect these microbes and, therefore, does not provide a thorough assessment of microbial populations in samples. The use of PCR allows for the detection of culturable microbes, VBNC organisms, and those that are no longer alive or active, as the amplification of genetic sequences does not generally require the pre-enrichment of microorga

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