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October, 2006
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Liver Failure, Acute: A form of rapid-onset Liver failure, also known as fulminant hepatic failure, caused by severe liver injury or massive loss of Hepatocytes. It is characterized by sudden development of liver dysfunction and Jaundice. Acute liver failure may progress to exhibit cerebral dysfunction even Hepatic coma depending on the etiology that includes hepatic Ischemia, drug toxicity, malignant infiltration, and viral hepatitis such as post-transfusion Hepatitis b and Hepatitis c.
 JoVE Medicine

Bile Duct Ligation in Mice: Induction of Inflammatory Liver Injury and Fibrosis by Obstructive Cholestasis

1Institute of Molecular Pathobiochemistry, Experimental Gene Therapy and Clinical Chemistry, RWTH Aachen University, 2Institute for Laboratory Animal Science and Experimental Surgery, RWTH Aachen University, 3Department of Medicine III, RWTH Aachen University

JoVE 52438

 JoVE Medicine

Quantification of the Immunosuppressant Tacrolimus on Dried Blood Spots Using LC-MS/MS

1iC42 Clinical Research and Development, University of Colorado, Anschutz Medical Campus, 2Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, 3Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Center of Drug Evaluation Research - Office of Generic Drugs, 4Transplant Clinical Research, University of Cincinnati

JoVE 52424

 JoVE Immunology and Infection

Deciphering and Imaging Pathogenesis and Cording of Mycobacterium abscessus in Zebrafish Embryos

1Dynamique des Interactions Membranaires Normales et Pathologiques, CNRS, UMR 535, Université Montpellier, 2Centre d'études d'agents Pathogènes et Biotechnologies pour la Santé, CNRS, FRE 3689, Université Montpellier, 3Unité de Formation et de Recherche des Sciences de la Santé, EA3647-EPIM, Université Versailles St Quentin

JoVE 53130

 JoVE Medicine

Non-invasive Imaging of Acute Allograft Rejection after Rat Renal Transplantation Using 18F-FDG PET

1Department of Internal Medicine D, Experimental Nephrology, University of Münster, 2Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Münster, 3European Institute for Molecular Imaging, University of Münster

JoVE 4240

 JoVE Medicine

A Novel Microsurgical Model for Heterotopic, En Bloc Chest Wall, Thymus, and Heart Transplantation in Mice

1Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 2Burn and Complex Wound Center, 3Section of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University of Chicago Medical Center, 4Division of Plastic, Reconstructive, and Maxillofacial Surgery, R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center, 5Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 6Vascularized Composite Allotransplantation (VCA) Lab, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

JoVE 53442

 JoVE Cancer Research

Operating Procedures of the Electrochemotherapy for Treatment of Tumor in Dogs and Cats

1Clinic for Surgery and Small Animals, Veterinary Faculty, University of Ljubljana, 2Department of Experimental Oncology, Institute of Oncology Ljubljana, 3Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Primorska, 4IPBS (Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale), CNRS, 5IPBS (Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale), Université de Toulouse

JoVE 54760

 JoVE Cancer Research

Long-term High-Resolution Intravital Microscopy in the Lung with a Vacuum Stabilized Imaging Window

1Department of Developmental and Molecular Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 2Department of Obstetrics/Gynecology and Woman’s Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 3Department of Anatomy & Structural Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 4Gruss-Lipper Biophotonics Center Integrated Imaging Program, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 5Medical Research Council Centre for Reproductive Health, Queen’s Medical Research Institute, University of Edinburgh

JoVE 54603

 JoVE Developmental Biology

Isolation of Perivascular Multipotent Precursor Cell Populations from Human Cardiac Tissue

1Centre for Cardiovascular Science, Queen's Medical Research Institute, University of Edinburgh, 2Department of Bioengineering and Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, 3Research Laboratory of Electronics and Department of Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 4MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, University of Edinburgh, 5Stem Cell Research Center, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, 6Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, 7Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, UCLA Orthopaedic Hospital, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles

JoVE 54252

 JoVE Medicine

Intraluminal Drug Delivery to the Mouse Arteriovenous Fistula Endothelium

1Department of Surgery and the Vascular Biology and Therapeutics Program, Yale University, 2Department of Vascular Surgery, University of Tokyo, 3Department of Vascular Surgery, VA Connecticut Healthcare Systems, 4Department of Vascular Surgery, International University of Health and Welfare Mita Hospital

JoVE 53905

 Science Education: Essentials of Physical Examinations I

Respiratory Exam II: Percussion and Auscultation

JoVE Science Education

Source: Suneel Dhand, MD, Attending Physician, Internal Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Learning the proper technique for percussion and auscultation of the respiratory system is vital and comes with practice on real patients. Percussion is a useful skill that is often skipped during everyday clinical practice, but if performed correctly, it can help the physician to identify underlying lung pathology. Auscultation can provide an almost immediate diagnosis for a number of acute pulmonary conditions, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, pneumonia, and pneumothorax. The areas for auscultating the lungs correspond to the lung zones. Each lung lobe can be pictured underneath the chest wall during percussion and auscultation (Figure 1). The right lung has three lobes: the superior, middle, and inferior lobes. The left lung has two lobes: the superior and inferior lobes. The superior lobe of the left lung also has a separate projection known as the lingual. Figure 1. Anatomy of lungs with respect to the chest wall. An approximate projection of lungs and their fissures and lobes

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