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Pathological Conditions, Anatomical: An abnormal structural condition of the human body, usually macroscopic, that is common to a variety of different diseases.
 JoVE Medicine

Adapting Human Videofluoroscopic Swallow Study Methods to Detect and Characterize Dysphagia in Murine Disease Models

1Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, University of Missouri, 2Department of Communication Science and Disorders, University of Missouri, 3Department of Medicine, University of Missouri

JoVE 52319

 JoVE Medicine

Detection of Disease-associated α-synuclein by Enhanced ELISA in the Brain of Transgenic Mice Overexpressing Human A53T Mutated α-synuclein

1Neurodegenerative Diseases Unit, ANSES - French Agency for Food, Environmental and Occupational Health & Safety, 2Indicia Production, 3AJ Roboscreen GmbH, 4Epidemiology Unit, ANSES - French Agency for Food, Environmental and Occupational Health & Safety, 5Experimental Facilities, ANSES - French Agency for Food, Environmental and Occupational Health & Safety

JoVE 52752

 JoVE Neuroscience

In vivo Imaging of Optic Nerve Fiber Integrity by Contrast-Enhanced MRI in Mice

1Hans Berger Department of Neurology, Jena University Hospital, 2Immunology, Leibniz Institute for Age Research, Fritz Lipmann Institute, Jena, 3Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Medical Physics Group, Jena University Hospital

JoVE 51274

 JoVE Medicine

Combined In vivo Optical and µCT Imaging to Monitor Infection, Inflammation, and Bone Anatomy in an Orthopaedic Implant Infection in Mice

1Orthopaedic Hospital Research Center, Orthopaedic Hospital Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), 2PerkinElmer, 3Department of Dermatology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 4Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

JoVE 51612

 JoVE Medicine

Flexible Colonoscopy in Mice to Evaluate the Severity of Colitis and Colorectal Tumors Using a Validated Endoscopic Scoring System

1Division of Gastroenterology, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, 2Department of Pathology, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, 3Digestive Health Research Center, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland

JoVE 50843

 JoVE Medicine

Techniques for Processing Eyes Implanted With a Retinal Prosthesis for Localized Histopathological Analysis

1Bionics Institute, 2Department of Anatomical Pathology, St Vincent's Hospital Melbourne, 3Department of Pathology, University of Melbourne, 4Medical Bionics Department, University of Melbourne

JoVE 50411

 JoVE Immunology and Infection

Monitoring Dendritic Cell Migration using 19F / 1H Magnetic Resonance Imaging

1Experimental and Clinical Research Center, A joint cooperation between the Charité Medical Faculty and the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine, 2Berlin Ultrahigh Field Facility (B.U.F.F.), Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine

JoVE 50251

 JoVE Behavior

Measurement of Fronto-limbic Activity Using an Emotional Oddball Task in Children with Familial High Risk for Schizophrenia

1Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, 2Duke-UNC Brain Imaging and Analysis Center, Duke University Medical Center, 3Curriculum in Neurobiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

JoVE 51484

 JoVE Medicine

Ischemic Tissue Injury in the Dorsal Skinfold Chamber of the Mouse: A Skin Flap Model to Investigate Acute Persistent Ischemia

1Department of Plastic Surgery and Hand Surgery, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, 2Department of Plastic, Reconstructive, Aesthetic and Hand Surgery, University Hospital of Basel, 3Institute for Clinical and Experimental Surgery, University of Saarland, 4Division of Plastic and Hand Surgery, University Hospital Zurich

JoVE 51900

 JoVE Developmental Biology

Imaging Subcellular Structures in the Living Zebrafish Embryo

1Institute of Neuronal Cell Biology, Technische Universität München, 2Cell Biology, Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Utrecht University, 3Faculty of Biology, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität-München, 4Adolf-Butenandt-Institute, Biochemistry, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität-München, 5German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, 6Laboratory of Brain Development and Repair, The Rockefeller University

JoVE 53456

 JoVE Neuroscience

A Dual Tracer PET-MRI Protocol for the Quantitative Measure of Regional Brain Energy Substrates Uptake in the Rat

1Research Center on Aging and Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Université de Sherbrooke, 2Sherbrooke Molecular Imaging Center, Étienne-Le Bel Clinical Research Center, Université de Sherbrooke, 3Department of Computer Science, Université de Sherbrooke, 4Department of Nuclear Medicine and Radiobiology, Université de Sherbrooke

JoVE 50761

 Science Education: Essentials of Physical Examinations II

Abdominal Exam II: Percussion

JoVE Science Education

Source: Alexander Goldfarb, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, MA

Medical percussion is based on the difference in pitch between the sounds elicited by tapping on the body wall. The auditory response to tapping depends on the ease with which the body wall vibrates, and is influenced by underlying organs, strength of the stroke, and the state of the body wall. There are three main medical percussion sounds: resonance (heard over lungs), tympany (heard over the air-filled bowel loops), and dullness (heard over fluid or solid organs). The contrast between dullness vs. tympany or resonance allows for determination of the size and margins of organs and masses, as well as identification of fluid accumulation and areas of consolidation. Percussion remains an intricate part of the physical diagnosis since it was first introduced more than 200 years ago, and is especially useful in examination of the lungs and abdomen. As a part of an abdominal examination, percussion follows visual inspection and auscultation. The examiner should first percuss over each of the nine abdominal regions (epigastric region, right hypochondriac region, left hypochondriac region, umbilical region, right lumbar region, left lumbar region, hypogastric region, right inguinal region, and left

 Science Education: Essentials of Physical Examinations I

Respiratory Exam II: Percussion and Auscultation

JoVE Science Education

Source: Suneel Dhand, MD, Attending Physician, Internal Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Learning the proper technique for percussion and auscultation of the respiratory system is vital and comes with practice on real patients. Percussion is a useful skill that is often skipped during everyday clinical practice, but if performed correctly, it can help the physician to identify underlying lung pathology. Auscultation can provide an almost immediate diagnosis for a number of acute pulmonary conditions, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, pneumonia, and pneumothorax. The areas for auscultating the lungs correspond to the lung zones. Each lung lobe can be pictured underneath the chest wall during percussion and auscultation (Figure 1). The right lung has three lobes: the superior, middle, and inferior lobes. The left lung has two lobes: the superior and inferior lobes. The superior lobe of the left lung also has a separate projection known as the lingual. Figure 1. Anatomy of lungs with respect to the chest wall. An approximate projection of lungs and their fissures and lobes

 JoVE Developmental Biology

Isolation of Perivascular Multipotent Precursor Cell Populations from Human Cardiac Tissue

1Centre for Cardiovascular Science, Queen's Medical Research Institute, University of Edinburgh, 2Department of Bioengineering and Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, 3Research Laboratory of Electronics and Department of Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 4MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, University of Edinburgh, 5Stem Cell Research Center, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, 6Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, 7Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, UCLA Orthopaedic Hospital, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles

JoVE 54252

 JoVE Developmental Biology

Automated Quantification of Hematopoietic Cell – Stromal Cell Interactions in Histological Images of Undecalcified Bone

1Immunodynamics, German Rheumatism Research Center, a Leibniz Institute, 2Biophysical Analytics, German Rheumatism Research Center, a Leibniz Institute, 3Max-Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine, 4Wimasis GmbH, 5Immunodynamics and Intravital Imaging, Charité - University of Medicine

JoVE 52544

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