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October, 2006
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Peritoneal Cavity: The space enclosed by the peritoneum. It is divided into two portions, the greater sac and the lesser sac or omental bursa, which lies behind the Stomach. The two sacs are connected by the foramen of Winslow, or epiploic foramen.
 JoVE Medicine

In Vivo and Ex Vivo Approaches to Study Ovarian Cancer Metastatic Colonization of Milky Spot Structures in Peritoneal Adipose

1Section of Urology, Department of Surgery, The University of Chicago, 2Department of Pathology, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, 3Campbell Family Institute for Breast Cancer Research, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, 4Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, Campbell Family Institute for Breast Cancer Research, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, University Health Network, 5Departments of Medicine, Pharmacology, and Cancer Biology, Duke University Medical Center

JoVE 52721

 JoVE Medicine

Bile Duct Ligation in Mice: Induction of Inflammatory Liver Injury and Fibrosis by Obstructive Cholestasis

1Institute of Molecular Pathobiochemistry, Experimental Gene Therapy and Clinical Chemistry, RWTH Aachen University, 2Institute for Laboratory Animal Science and Experimental Surgery, RWTH Aachen University, 3Department of Medicine III, RWTH Aachen University

JoVE 52438

 JoVE Medicine

Intraoperative Detection of Subtle Endometriosis: A Novel Paradigm for Detection and Treatment of Pelvic Pain Associated with the Loss of Peritoneal Integrity

1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, Greenville Hospital System, 2Department of Pathology, Duke University Health System, 3Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, Duke University

JoVE 4313

 JoVE Immunology and Infection

Isolation of Leukocytes from the Murine Tissues at the Maternal-Fetal Interface

1Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, 2School of Paediatrics and Reproductive Health, Research Centre for Reproductive Health, the Robinson Research Institute, The University of Adelaide, 3Department of Immunology & Microbiology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, 4Perinatology Research Branch, NICHD/NIH/DHHS

JoVE 52866

 JoVE Medicine

Method of Isolated Ex Vivo Lung Perfusion in a Rat Model: Lessons Learned from Developing a Rat EVLP Program

1Department of Biomedical Engineering, Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, 2Davis Heart & Lung Research Institute, Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, 3The Collaboration for Organ Perfusion, Protection, Engineering and Regeneration (COPPER) Laboratory, Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, 4Division of Cardiac Surgery, Department of Surgery, Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, 5Departments of Pediatrics and Internal Medicine, Ohio State University, 6Advanced Lung Disease Program, Lung and Heart-Lung Transplant Programs, Nationwide Children's Hospital, 7Division of Transplantation, Department of Surgery, Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

JoVE 52309

 JoVE Immunology and Infection

Cecal Ligation and Puncture-induced Sepsis as a Model To Study Autophagy in Mice

1Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, 2Department of Medicine, Renal Division, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 3First Department of Critical Care Medicine and Pulmonary Services, University of Athens Medical School, Evangelismos Hospital, Athens, Greece

JoVE 51066

 JoVE Medicine

Initiation of Metastatic Breast Carcinoma by Targeting of the Ductal Epithelium with Adenovirus-Cre: A Novel Transgenic Mouse Model of Breast Cancer

1Tumor Microenvironment and Metastasis Program, Wistar Institute, 2Department of Pathology and Lab Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 3Department of Microbiology and Immunology and Department of Genetics, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, 4Division of Endocrine and Oncologic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 5Rena Rowan Breast Center, Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania, 6Center for Advanced Medicine, University of Pennsylvania

JoVE 51171

 JoVE Developmental Biology

Characterization of Thymic Settling Progenitors in the Mouse Embryo Using In Vivo and In Vitro Assays

1Research Center Growth and Signaling, INSERM U845, Institut Cochin, 2Unit for Biology of Lymphocyte Populations, Immunology Department, Institut Pasteur and CIMI, Unity of Treg Biology and Therapy, University of Pierre & Marie Curie, 3Unit for Lymphopoiesis, Immunology Department, INSERM U668, University Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Cellule Pasteur, Institut Pasteur

JoVE 52795

 Science Education: Essentials of Physical Examinations II

Abdominal Exam II: Percussion

JoVE Science Education

Source: Alexander Goldfarb, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, MA

Medical percussion is based on the difference in pitch between the sounds elicited by tapping on the body wall. The auditory response to tapping depends on the ease with which the body wall vibrates, and is influenced by underlying organs, strength of the stroke, and the state of the body wall. There are three main medical percussion sounds: resonance (heard over lungs), tympany (heard over the air-filled bowel loops), and dullness (heard over fluid or solid organs). The contrast between dullness vs. tympany or resonance allows for determination of the size and margins of organs and masses, as well as identification of fluid accumulation and areas of consolidation. Percussion remains an intricate part of the physical diagnosis since it was first introduced more than 200 years ago, and is especially useful in examination of the lungs and abdomen. As a part of an abdominal examination, percussion follows visual inspection and auscultation. The examiner should first percuss over each of the nine abdominal regions (epigastric region, right hypochondriac region, left hypochondriac region, umbilical region, right lumbar region, left lumbar region, hypogastric region, right inguinal region, and left

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