Refine your search:

Containing Text
- - -
+
Filter by author or institution
GO
Filter by publication date
From:
October, 2006
Until:
Today
Filter by section
 
 
Pest Control: The reduction or regulation of the population of noxious, destructive, or dangerous insects, or other animals.
 JoVE Environment

Application of Two-spotted Spider Mite Tetranychus urticae for Plant-pest Interaction Studies

1Department of Biology, The University of Western Ontario, 2Instituto de Ciencias de la Vid y el Vino, 3Department of Crop Protection, Ghent University, 4Institute for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics, University of Amsterdam


JoVE 51738

 Science Education: Essentials of Environmental Science

Tree Identification: How To Use a Dichotomous Key

JoVE Science Education

Source: Laboratories of Margaret Workman and Kimberly Frye - Depaul University

A dichotomous key is a tool that identifies items in nature, such as leaves. This method is based on the idea of choosing between two characteristics. The word dichotomous comes from two Greek words that mean “to divide into two parts.” In a dichotomous key for leaf identification, each pair of phrases describes different features of the leaf. Only one of the phrases correctly applies to the leaf being keyed out. The correct phrase leads to the next pair of phrases, or states the name of the tree from which the leaf came. Using a field guide to trees and the iTree National Tree Benefits Calculator helps to identify trees in a field investigation, which shows the significance of trees in terms of their environmental benefits, such as storm water management, increasing property value, energy efficiency, air quality, and carbon sequestration.

 JoVE Environment

Mass Production of Genetically Modified Aedes aegypti for Field Releases in Brazil

1Oxitec Ltd, 2Departamento de Parasitologia, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, Universidade de São Paulo, 3Departamento de Epidemiologia, Universidade de São Paulo, 4Moscamed Brasil, 5Deptartment of Zoology, University of Oxford, 6Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia em Entomologia Molecular (INCT-EM)


JoVE 3579

 JoVE Biology

Chitosan/Interfering RNA Nanoparticle Mediated Gene Silencing in Disease Vector Mosquito Larvae

1Division of Biology, Kansas State University, 2Department of Medical and Molecular Genetics, Indiana University School of Medicine, 3Eck Institute for Global Health, University of Notre Dame, 4Department of Biological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, 5Department of Entomology, Kansas State University


JoVE 52523

 JoVE Immunology and Infection

Investigating Mast Cell Secretory Granules; from Biosynthesis to Exocytosis

1Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, 2Division of Allergy and Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, 3Laboratory of Membrane Trafficking Mechanisms, Department of Developmental Biology and Neurosciences, Graduate School of Life Sciences, Tohoku University


JoVE 52505

 Science Education: Essentials of Environmental Science

Using GIS to Investigate Urban Forestry

JoVE Science Education

Source: Laboratories of Margaret Workman and Kimberly Frye - Depaul University

Urban forests broadly include urban parks, street trees, landscaped boulevards, public gardens, river and coastal promenades, greenways, river corridors, wetlands, nature preserves, natural areas, shelterbelts of trees, and working trees at industrial brownfield sites. The history of urban trees begins with trees as landscape embellishment. Today, urban trees are seen as essential components of city infrastructure and critical to human life as food, housing, and other public utilities. Urban trees are now valued for the ecosystem services they provide (e.g., preventing erosion, air pollutant removal, oxygen, shade, etc.). Yet, to efficiently make use of these benefits, trees must reach maturity, as leaf number and size directly affect a tree’s ability to provide ecosystem services. Urban forestry has had to develop its own forestry methods to address the needs and challenges unique to urban trees as compared to their woodland counterparts. The following excerpt from the USDA Forest Service illustrates the urban tree perspective and policies of federal government: Urban forests are dynamic ecosystems that provide needed environmental services by cleanin

12345678989
More Results...
Waiting
simple hit counter