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Pubic Symphysis:
 Science Education: Essentials of Physical Examinations II

Abdominal Exam IV: Acute Abdominal Pain Assessment

JoVE Science Education

Source: Joseph Donroe, MD, Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT

Abdominal pain is a frequent presenting concern in both the emergency department and the office setting. Acute abdominal pain is defined as pain lasting less than seven days, while an acute abdomen refers to the abrupt onset of severe abdominal pain with features suggesting a surgically intervenable process. The differential diagnosis of acute abdominal pain is broad; thus, clinicians must have a systematic method of examination guided by a careful history, remembering that pathology outside of the abdomen can also cause abdominal pain, including pulmonary, cardiac, rectal, and genital disorders. Terminology for describing the location of abdominal tenderness includes the right and left upper and lower quadrants, and the epigastric, umbilical, and hypogastric regions (Figures 1, 2). Thorough examination requires an organized approach involving inspection, auscultation, percussion, and palpation, with each maneuver performed purposefully and with a clear mental representation of the anatomy. Rather than palpating randomly across the abdomen, begin palpating remotely from the site of tenderness, moving systematically toward the tender region, and thi

 Science Education: Essentials of Physical Examinations II

Pelvic Exam I: Assessment of the External Genitalia

JoVE Science Education

Source:
Alexandra Duncan, GTA, Praxis Clinical, New Haven, CT
Tiffany Cook, GTA, Praxis Clinical, New Haven, CT
Jaideep S. Talwalkar, MD, Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT

The pelvic exam can feel invasive to patients, so it is important to do everything possible to make patients feel comfortable and empowered, rather than vulnerable. Clinicians should be aware of how they are communicating, both verbally and nonverbally, and should give their patients control whenever possible. There are many ways to do this, from how the exam table is positioned to how the patient is engaged throughout the exam. As many as 1 in 5 patients may have experienced sexual trauma; therefore, it is important to avoid triggering those patients, but it's not always possible to know who they are. The exam in this video demonstrates neutral language and techniques that can be employed with all patients to create the best experience possible. It's important to keep the patient covered wherever possible and to minimize extraneous contact. A clinician should be careful to tuck fingers that aren't being used to examine the patient to avoid accidental contact with the clitoris or anus. Before performing the pelvic e

 Science Education: Essentials of Physical Examinations II

Abdominal Exam II: Percussion

JoVE Science Education

Source: Alexander Goldfarb, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, MA

Medical percussion is based on the difference in pitch between the sounds elicited by tapping on the body wall. The auditory response to tapping depends on the ease with which the body wall vibrates, and is influenced by underlying organs, strength of the stroke, and the state of the body wall. There are three main medical percussion sounds: resonance (heard over lungs), tympany (heard over the air-filled bowel loops), and dullness (heard over fluid or solid organs). The contrast between dullness vs. tympany or resonance allows for determination of the size and margins of organs and masses, as well as identification of fluid accumulation and areas of consolidation. Percussion remains an intricate part of the physical diagnosis since it was first introduced more than 200 years ago, and is especially useful in examination of the lungs and abdomen. As a part of an abdominal examination, percussion follows visual inspection and auscultation. The examiner should first percuss over each of the nine abdominal regions (epigastric region, right hypochondriac region, left hypochondriac region, umbilical region, right lumbar region, left lumbar region, hypogastric region, right inguinal region, and left

 JoVE Medicine

Normothermic Ex Vivo Kidney Perfusion for the Preservation of Kidney Grafts prior to Transplantation

1Multi Organ Transplant Program, Department of Surgery, Toronto General Hospital, 2Division of Nephrology, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, 3Department of General, Visceral & Transplant Surgery, University Medical Center Mainz, 4Department of Abdominal, Vascular & Transplant Surgery, Merheim Medical Center Cologne, 5Laboratory Medicine & Pathobiology, Toronto General Hospital, 6Departments of Surgery (Urology) & Physiology, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, 7Developmental & Stem Cell Biology, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto


JoVE 52909

 JoVE Neuroscience

Detection of Microregional Hypoxia in Mouse Cerebral Cortex by Two-photon Imaging of Endogenous NADH Fluorescence

1Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Rochester Medical Center, 2Center for Neural Development and Disease, University of Rochester Medical Center, 3Deptartment of Neurology, Center for Neural Development and Disease, University of Rochester Medical Center


JoVE 3466

 Science Education: Inactive Collection

Arterial Line Placement

JoVE Science Education

Source: Sharon Bord, MD, Department of Emergency Medicine, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Maryland, USA

When monitoring patients, it is important to obtain values that are accurate and reliable. Blood pressure monitoring is one of the essential vital signs and, for a majority of patients, measuring it utilizing non-invasive techniques provides accurate values. However, there are situations in which the blood pressure requires more exact, specific, and reliable measurements. This can be achieved by intra-arterial blood pressure monitoring and requires arterial line placement. Arterial line placement refers to the insertion of a catheter, which is able to transduce blood pressure, into one of the major arteries (e.g. radial or femoral artery). Patients who potentially need arterial line placement include those with extreme low (such as in sepsis or cardiogenic shock) or high (as in cerebrovascular accident or hypertensive emergency) blood pressure measurements. Many of these patients are placed on vasoactive medications to either increase or decrease their blood pressure. When the goal is to decrease the blood pressure of a patient, it must be done gradually, which further necessitates close blood pressure monitoring. Arterial line placement is also ideal for patients who require frequent arterial blood ga

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 Science Education: Essentials of Physical Examinations II

Abdominal Exam I: Inspection and Auscultation

JoVE Science Education

Source: Alexander Goldfarb, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, MA

Gastrointestinal disease accounts for millions of office visits and hospital admissions annually. Physical examination of the abdomen is a crucial tool in diagnosing diseases of the gastrointestinal tract; in addition, it can help identify pathological processes in cardiovascular, urinary, and other systems. As physical examination in general, the examination of the abdominal region is important for establishing physician-patient contact, for reaching the preliminary diagnosis and selecting subsequent laboratory and imaging tests, and determining the urgency of care. As with the other parts of a physical examination, visual inspection and auscultation of the abdomen are done in a systematic fashion so that no potential findings are missed. Special attention should be paid to potential problems already identified by the patient's history. Here we assume that the patient has already been identified, and has had history taken, symptoms discussed, and areas of potential concern identified. In this video we will not review the patient's history; instead, we will go directly to the physical examination. Before we get to the examination, let's briefly review s

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 Science Education: Inactive Collection

Central Venous Catheter Insertion: Femoral Vein with Ultrasound Guidance

JoVE Science Education

Source: James W Bonz, MD, Emergency Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, USA

Central venous access is necessary in a multitude of clinical situations including vascular access, vasopressor and caustic medication delivery, central venous pressure monitoring, volume resuscitation, total parental nutrition, hemodialysis, and frequent phlebotomy. There are three veins in the body that are accessed for central venous cannulation: the internal jugular, the subclavian, and the femoral. Each of these vessels has distinct advantages and disadvantages with unique anatomical considerations. Femoral vein cannulation can be easily performed both under ultrasound guidance and using the surface landmarks, therefore femoral access is often used when emergent placement of a central venous catheter (CVC) is needed (such as in the case of medical codes and trauma resuscitations). In addition, cannulation of the femoral artery allows one to simultaneously perform other procedures needed for stabilization, such as cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and intubation. Successful placement of a femoral CVC requires working understanding of the target anatomy, access to with procedural ultrasound, and fluidity in the Seldinger technique. Seld

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 Science Education: Essentials of Physical Examinations I

Peripheral Vascular Exam

JoVE Science Education

Source: Joseph Donroe, MD, Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT

The prevalence of peripheral vascular disease (PVD) increases with age and is a significant cause of morbidity in older patients, and peripheral artery disease (PAD) is associated with cardiovascular and cerebrovascular complications. Diabetes, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, and tobacco use are important disease risk factors. When patients become symptomatic, they frequently complain of limb claudication, defined as a cramp-like muscle pain that worsens with activity and improves with rest. Patients with chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) often present with lower extremity swelling, pain, skin changes, and ulceration. While the benefits of screening asymptomatic patients for PVD are unclear, physicians should know the proper exam technique when the diagnosis of PVD is being considered. This video reviews the vascular examination of the upper and lower extremities and abdomen. As always, the examiner should use a systematic method of examination, though in practice, the extent of the exam a physician performs depends on their suspicion of underlying PVD. In a patient who has or is suspected to have risk factors for vascular disease, the vascular exam should be thorough, beginning with inspection, fo

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 JoVE Bioengineering

In situ Compressive Loading and Correlative Noninvasive Imaging of the Bone-periodontal Ligament-tooth Fibrous Joint

1Division of Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Department of Preventive and Restorative Dental Sciences, University of California San Francisco, 2Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California San Francisco, 3Xradia Inc.


JoVE 51147

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 JoVE Neuroscience

In Vitro Recording of Mesenteric Afferent Nerve Activity in Mouse Jejunal and Colonic Segments

1Laboratory of Experimental Medicine and Pediatrics, Division of Gastroenterology, University of Antwerp, 2Visceral Pain Group, Discipline of Medicine, University of Adelaide, 3Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Sheffield, 4Department of Pharmacy, Pharmacology and Postgraduate Medicine, University of Hertfordshire, 5Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Antwerp University Hospital


JoVE 54576

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 Science Education: Essentials of Physical Examinations I

Proper Adjustment of Patient Attire during the Physical Exam

JoVE Science Education

Source: Jaideep S. Talwalkar, MD, and Joseph Donroe, MD, Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT

In order to optimize the predictive value of the physical examination, the provider must perform maneuvers correctly. The proper use of drapes is an important component of correctly performing physical examination maneuvers. Skin lesions are missed when "inspection" occurs through clothing, crackles are erroneously reported when the lungs are examined through a t-shirt, and subtle findings on the heart exam go undetected when auscultation is performed over clothing. Accordingly, the best practice standards call for examining with one's hands or equipment in direct contact with the patient's skin (i.e., do not examine through a gown, drape, or clothing). In addition to its clinical value, the correct draping technique is important for improving the patient's comfort level during the encounter. Like all other aspects of the physical exam, it takes deliberate thought and practice to find the right balance between draping, which is done to preserve patient modesty, and exposure, which is necessary to optimize access to the parts that need examination. Individual provider styles in the use of gowns and drapes vary consider

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 JoVE Medicine

A Novel in vivo Gene Transfer Technique and in vitro Cell Based Assays for the Study of Bone Loss in Musculoskeletal Disorders

1Division of Rheumatology, Allergy and Clinical Immunology, University of California, Davis, 2Institute for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Shriners Hospitals for Children - Northern California, 3Department of Dermatology, University of California, Davis


JoVE 51810

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 JoVE Medicine

A New Murine Model of Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair

1INSERM U698 Cardiovascular Remodelling, Hôpital X. Bichat, AP-HP, Paris, 2Bio-Ingénierie des Polymères Cardiovasculaires (BPC), Institut Galilée - Université Paris 13, Paris, France, 3Service de Chirurgie Vasculaire, Hôpital Henri Mondor, AP-HP, Université Paris-Est Creteil, 4Ecole de chirurgie de l'assistance publique des hôpitaux de Paris, 5Service de Chirurgie Cardiaque et Vasculaire, Hôpital Européen Georges Pompidou, AP-HP, Université René Descartes


JoVE 50740

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