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Pulmonary Valve: A valve situated at the entrance to the pulmonary trunk from the right ventricle.
 JoVE Medicine

Method of Isolated Ex Vivo Lung Perfusion in a Rat Model: Lessons Learned from Developing a Rat EVLP Program

1Department of Biomedical Engineering, Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, 2Davis Heart & Lung Research Institute, Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, 3The Collaboration for Organ Perfusion, Protection, Engineering and Regeneration (COPPER) Laboratory, Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, 4Division of Cardiac Surgery, Department of Surgery, Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, 5Departments of Pediatrics and Internal Medicine, Ohio State University, 6Advanced Lung Disease Program, Lung and Heart-Lung Transplant Programs, Nationwide Children's Hospital, 7Division of Transplantation, Department of Surgery, Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

JoVE 52309

 JoVE Medicine

Increasing Pulmonary Artery Pulsatile Flow Improves Hypoxic Pulmonary Hypertension in Piglets

1Department of Medicine, Pulmonary Hypertension Research Group (CRIUCPQ), Laval University, 2Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, 3Université Diderot Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 4Hôpital Lariboisière, Physiologie clinique Explorations Fonctionnelles, 5INSERM U 965, 6Service de Cardiologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Tours

JoVE 52571

 JoVE Medicine

Calcification of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells and Imaging of Aortic Calcification and Inflammation

1Anesthesia Center for Critical Care Research of the Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care, and Pain Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, 2Cardiovascular Research Center and Cardiology Division of the Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, 3Cardiovascular Division, Brigham and Women's Hospital, 4Harvard Medical School, 5Department of Anesthesiology, Uniklinik RWTH Aachen, RWTH Aachen University, 6Center for Immunology and Inflammatory Diseases and the Division of Rheumatology, Allergy, and Immunology of the Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital

JoVE 54017

 JoVE Medicine

Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension and Assessment of Right Ventricular Function in the Piglet

1Surgical Research Lab, Marie Lannelongue Hospital, 2Department of Pathology, Marie Lannelongue Hospital, 3Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery, Marie Lannelongue Hospital, 4Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, University Hospital of Rennes, 5INSERM U999 Paris-Sud University

JoVE 53133

 JoVE Bioengineering

Nonhuman Primate Lung Decellularization and Recellularization Using a Specialized Large-organ Bioreactor

1Center for Stem Cell Research and Regenerative Medicine, Tulane University School of Medicine, 2Division of Regenerative Medicine, Tulane National Primate Research Center, 3Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Tulane University School of Medicine, 4Department of Pharmacology, Tulane University School of Medicine

JoVE 50825

 JoVE Bioengineering

Protocol for Relative Hydrodynamic Assessment of Tri-leaflet Polymer Valves

1Tissue Engineered Mechanics, Imaging and Materials Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Florida International University, 2Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Florida, 3College of Medicine, University of Florida, 4King Faisal Specialty Hospital and Research Center, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

JoVE 50335

 JoVE Medicine

Automated Measurement of Pulmonary Emphysema and Small Airway Remodeling in Cigarette Smoke-exposed Mice

1Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital - Harvard Medical School, 2Department of Respiratory Medicine, University of Cambridge - Addenbrooke's Hospital, 3Lung Transplant Program, Brigham and Women's Hospital - Harvard Medical School, 4COPD and IPF Programs, Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute

JoVE 52236

 Science Education: Essentials of Physical Examinations I

Cardiac Exam III: Abnormal Heart Sounds

JoVE Science Education

Source: Suneel Dhand, MD, Attending Physician, Internal Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Having a fundamental understanding of normal heart sounds is the first step toward distinguishing the normal from the abnormal. Murmurs are sounds that represent turbulent and abnormal blood flow across a heart valve. They are caused either by stenosis (valve area too narrow) or regurgitation (backflow of blood across the valve) and are commonly heard as a "swishing" sound during auscultation. Murmurs are graded from 1 to 6 in intensity (1 being the softest and 6 the loudest) (Figure 1). The most common cardiac murmurs heard are left-sided murmurs of the aortic and mitral valves. Right-sided murmurs of the pulmonary and tricuspid valves are less common. Murmurs are typically heard loudest at the anatomical area that corresponds with the valvular pathology. Frequently, they also radiate to other areas. Figure 1. The Levine scale used to grade murmur intensity. In addition to the two main heart sounds, S1 and S2, which are normally produced by the closing of heart valves, there are two other abnormal heart sounds, known as S3 and S4. These are also known as

 JoVE Cancer Research

Long-term High-Resolution Intravital Microscopy in the Lung with a Vacuum Stabilized Imaging Window

1Department of Developmental and Molecular Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 2Department of Obstetrics/Gynecology and Woman’s Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 3Department of Anatomy & Structural Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 4Gruss-Lipper Biophotonics Center Integrated Imaging Program, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 5Medical Research Council Centre for Reproductive Health, Queen’s Medical Research Institute, University of Edinburgh

JoVE 54603

 Science Education: Essentials of Physical Examinations I

Cardiac Exam II: Auscultation

JoVE Science Education

Source: Suneel Dhand, MD, Attending Physician, Internal Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Proficiency in the use of a stethoscope to listen to heart sounds and the ability to differentiate between normal and abnormal heart sounds are essential skills for any physician. Correct placement of the stethoscope on the chest corresponds to the sound of cardiac valves closing. The heart has two main sounds: S1 and S2. The first heart sound (S1) occurs as the mitral and tricuspid valves (atrioventricular valves) close after blood enters the ventricles. This represents the start of systole. The second heart sound (S2) occurs when the aortic and pulmonary valves (semilunar valves) close after blood has left the ventricles to enter the systemic and pulmonary circulation systems at the end of systole. Traditionally, the sounds are known as a "lub-dub." Auscultation of the heart is performed using both diaphragm and bell parts of the stethoscope chest piece. The diaphragm is most commonly used and is best for high-frequency sounds (such as S1 and S2) and murmurs of mitral regurgitation and aortic stenosis. The diaphragm should be pressed firmly against the chest wall. The bell best transmits low-frequency sounds (such as S3 and S4) and the murmur of mitral stenosis. The bell should be applied

 JoVE Bioengineering

Culturing Mouse Cardiac Valves in the Miniature Tissue Culture System

1Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Leiden University Medical Center, 2Department of Engineering Technology, New Jersey Institute of Technology, 3Department of Urology, Leiden University Medical Center, 4Cardiovascular Research Institute, Department of Cell Biology and Molecular Medicine, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School

JoVE 52750

 Science Education: Essentials of Physical Examinations I

Blood Pressure Measurement

JoVE Science Education

Source: Meghan Fashjian, ACNP-BC, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston MA

The term blood pressure (BP) describes lateral pressures produced by blood upon the vessel walls. BP is a vital sign obtained routinely in hospital and outpatient settings, and is one of the most common medical assessments performed around the world. It can be determined directly with the intra-arterial catheter or by indirect method, which is a non-invasive, safe, easily reproducible, and thus most used technique. One of the most important applications of BP measurements is the screening, diagnosis, and monitoring of hypertension, a condition that affects almost one third of the U.S. adult population and is one of the leading causes of the cardiovascular disease. BP can be measured automatically by oscillometry or manually by auscultation utilizing a sphygmomanometer, a device with an inflatable cuff to collapse the artery and a manometer to measure the pressure. Determination of the pulse-obliterating pressure by palpation is done prior to auscultation to give a rough estimate of the target systolic pressure. Next, the examiner places a stethoscope over the brachial artery of the patient, inflates the cuff above the expected systolic pressure, and then auscultates while deflating the cuff and o

 JoVE Medicine

High-frequency High-resolution Echocardiography: First Evidence on Non-invasive Repeated Measure of Myocardial Strain, Contractility, and Mitral Regurgitation in the Ischemia-reperfused Murine Heart

1Department of Surgery, The Ohio State University, 2Heart and Lung Research Institute, The Ohio State University, 3Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, The Ohio State University

JoVE 1781

 JoVE Medicine

Measuring Ascending Aortic Stiffness In Vivo in Mice Using Ultrasound

1Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 2Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, 3Department of Medicine (Cardiology), Johns Hopkins University, 4The Australian School of Advanced Medicine, Macquarie University

JoVE 52200

 JoVE Medicine

Bronchoalveolar Lavage (BAL) for Research; Obtaining Adequate Sample Yield

1Biomedical Research Centre in Microbial Diseases, National Institute for Health Research, 2Respiratory Infection Group, Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University Hospital Trust, 3Respiratory Infection Group, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, 4Institute of Infection and Global Health, University of Liverpool, 5Comprehensive Local Research Network, Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University Hospital Trust, 6Department of Respiratory Research, University Hospital Aintree

JoVE 4345

 JoVE Medicine

Inducing Myointimal Hyperplasia Versus Atherosclerosis in Mice: An Introduction of Two Valid Models

1Transplant and Stem Cell Immunobiology Lab, Cardiovascular Research Center, University Hospital Hamburg, 2Cardiovascular Research Center (CVRC) and DZHK University Hamburg, 3Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, University Heart Center Hamburg, 4Center for Interventional Vascular Therapy, Division of Cardiology, Columbia University, 5Cardiovascular Research Foundation, New York, 6Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, 7Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Falk Cardiovascular Research Center

JoVE 51459

 JoVE Medicine

Voluntary Breath-hold Technique for Reducing Heart Dose in Left Breast Radiotherapy

1Department of Radiotherapy, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, 2Centre for Vision, Speech and Signal Processing, Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, 3Clinical Trials and Statistics Unit (ICR-CTSU), Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton, UK, 4Division of Radiotherapy and Imaging, Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton, UK

JoVE 51578

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