Refine your search:

Containing Text
- - -
+
Filter by author or institution
GO
Filter by publication date
From:
October, 2006
Until:
Today
Filter by section
 
 
RNA, Algal: Ribonucleic acid in algae having regulatory and catalytic roles as well as involvement in protein synthesis.
 JoVE Immunology and Infection

A Rapid Strategy for the Isolation of New Faustoviruses from Environmental Samples Using Vermamoeba vermiformis

1Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy, Research Unit for Infectious and Tropical Emerging Diseases, Aix Marseille University, 2Pole of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, Clinical and Biological Sector, Federation of Bacteriology-Hygiene Virology, University Hospital Institute Mediterranean Infection


JoVE 54104

Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
 Science Education: Essentials of Environmental Microbiology

Algae Enumeration via Culturable Methodology

JoVE Science Education

Source: Laboratories of Dr. Ian Pepper and Dr. Charles Gerba - Arizona University
Demonstrating Author: Bradley Schmitz

Algae are a highly heterogeneous group of microorganisms that have one common trait, namely the possession of photosynthetic pigments. In the environment, algae can cause problems for swimming pool owners by growing in the water. Algae can also cause problems in surface waters, such as lakes and reservoirs, due to algal blooms that release toxins. More recently, algae are being evaluated as novel sources of energy via algal biofuels. Blue-green algae are actually bacteria classified as cyanobacteria. Cyanobacteria not only photosynthesize, but also have the ability to fix nitrogen gas from the atmosphere. Other algae are eukaryotic, ranging from single-celled organisms to complex multicellular organisms, like seaweeds. These include the green algae, the euglenoids, the dinoflagellates, the golden brown algae, diatoms, the brown algae, and the red algae. In soils, algal populations are frequently 106 per gram. These numbers are lower than corresponding numbers for bacteria, actinomycetes, and fungi, mostly because the sunlight required for photosynthesis cannot penetrate far beneath the soil surface. Because algae are phototrophic, obtaining energy from photosyn

Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
 JoVE Bioengineering

Multi-analyte Biochip (MAB) Based on All-solid-state Ion-selective Electrodes (ASSISE) for Physiological Research

1Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Birck-Bindley Physiological Sensing Facility, Purdue University, 2NASA Ames Research Center, 3Department of Chemistry, Pennsylvania State University Hazleton, 4Cooley LLP, 5NASA Life and Physical Sciences, Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate, NASA Headquarters


JoVE 50020

Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
 JoVE Bioengineering

Nanomanipulation of Single RNA Molecules by Optical Tweezers

1Nanoscale Engineering Graduate Program, College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, University at Albany, State University of New York, 2Nanoscale Science Undergraduate Program, College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, University at Albany, State University of New York, 3Nanobioscience Constellation, College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, University at Albany, State University of New York, 4The RNA Institute, University at Albany, State University of New York, 5Department of Biological Sciences, University at Albany, State University of New York


JoVE 51542

Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
 JoVE Developmental Biology

Understanding Early Organogenesis Using a Simplified In Situ Hybridization Protocol in Xenopus

1Developmental and Stem Cell Biology, Hospital for Sick Children, 2Children's Health Research Institute, University of Western Ontario, 3Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Western Ontario, 4Neurosciences and Mental Health, Hospital for Sick Children, 5Department of Paediatrics, University of Western Ontario


JoVE 51526

Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
 Science Education: Essentials of Environmental Science

Nutrients in Aquatic Ecosystems

JoVE Science Education

Source: Laboratories of Margaret Workman and Kimberly Frye - Depaul University

Nitrogen and phosphorus are essential plant nutrients found in aquatic ecosystems and both are monitored as a part of water quality testing because in excess amounts they can cause significant water quality problems. 

Nitrogen in water is measured as the common form nitrate (NO3-) that is dissolved in water and readily absorbed by photosynthesizers such as algae. The common form of phosphorus measured is phosphate (PO43-), which is strongly attracted to sediment particles as well as dissolved in water. In excess amounts, both nutrients can cause an increase in aquatic plant growth (algal bloom, Figure 1) that can disrupt the light, temperature, and oxygen levels in the water below and lead to eutrophication and hypoxia (low dissolved oxygen in water) forming a “dead zone” of no biological activity. Sources of nitrates and phosphorus include wastewater treatment plants, runoff from fertilized lawns and agricultural lands, faulty septic systems, animal manure runoff, and industrial waste discharge. Figu

Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
 JoVE Biology

Chitosan/Interfering RNA Nanoparticle Mediated Gene Silencing in Disease Vector Mosquito Larvae

1Division of Biology, Kansas State University, 2Department of Medical and Molecular Genetics, Indiana University School of Medicine, 3Eck Institute for Global Health, University of Notre Dame, 4Department of Biological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, 5Department of Entomology, Kansas State University


JoVE 52523

Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
 JoVE Biology

Preparation of Formalin-fixed Paraffin-embedded Tissue Cores for both RNA and DNA Extraction

1Department of Pathology & Molecular Medicine, Queen's University, 2Division of Cancer Biology & Genetics, Queen's Cancer Research Institute, Queen's University, 3Department of Surgery, Division of Urology, McGill University, 4Transformative Pathology Program, Ontario Institute for Cancer Research (OICR)


JoVE 54299

Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
 Science Education: Essentials of Environmental Science

Dissolved Oxygen in Surface Water

JoVE Science Education

Source: Laboratories of Margaret Workman and Kimberly Frye - Depaul University

Dissolved oxygen (DO) measurements calculate the amount of gaseous oxygen dissolved in surface water, which is important to all oxygen-breathing life in river ecosystems, including fish species preferred for human consumption (e.g. bluegill and bass), as well as decomposer species critical to the recycling of biogeochemical materials in the system. The oxygen dissolved in lakes, rivers, and oceans is crucial for the organisms and creatures living in it. As the amount of dissolved oxygen drops below normal levels in water bodies, the water quality is harmed and creatures begin to die. In a process called eutrophication, a body of water can become hypoxic and will no longer be able to support living organisms, essentially becoming a “dead zone.” Eutrophication occurs when excess nutrients cause algae populations to grow rapidly in an algal bloom. The algal bloom forms dense mats at the surface of the water blocking out two essential inputs of oxygen for water: gas exchange from the atmosphere and photosynthesis in the water due to the lack of light below the mats. As dissolved oxygen levels decline below the surface, oxygen-breathing organisms die-off in large amounts, creati

Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
 JoVE Neuroscience

Detection of the Genome and Transcripts of a Persistent DNA Virus in Neuronal Tissues by Fluorescent In situ Hybridization Combined with Immunostaining

1Virus and Centromere Team, Centre de Génétique et Physiologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire, CNRS UMR 5534, 2Université de Lyon 1, 3Laboratoire d'excellence, LabEX DEVweCAN, 4Institut de Virologie Moléculaire et Structurale, CNRS UPR 3296, 5Centre de Recherche en Cancérologie de Lyon, INSERM U1052, CNRS UMR 5286


JoVE 51091

Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
 Science Education: Essentials of Environmental Science

Turbidity and Total Solids in Surface Water

JoVE Science Education

Source: Laboratories of Margaret Workman and Kimberly Frye - Depaul University

Turbidity and total solids are related measurements addressing clarity of surface waters. Turbidity is an indirect measure of water clarity that determines the amount of light that can pass through the water. Total solids is a direct measurement of solid particles suspended in water determined by weight. High levels of turbidity and total solids are caused by soil erosion, waste discharge, runoff, or changes in ecological communities including algal growth or abundance of benthic organisms that can disrupt sediments up into the water. Higher levels of turbidity and suspended solids can lower water quality by absorbing heat causing an increase in water temperature and a decrease in oxygen levels (warm water holds less oxygen). These conditions can also cause a decrease in photosynthesis as less sunlight penetrates the water, making the water unable to support some aquatic life. Suspended solids can also clog gills, smother eggs, reduce growth rates, and disrupt microhabitats of many aquatic organisms. One method of measuring turbidity includes using a Secchi disk. A Secchi disk is a metal disk with alternate black and white quarters (Figure 1). It is attached to a rope that

12345678922
More Results...
Waiting
simple hit counter