Refine your search:

Containing Text
- - -
+
Filter by author or institution
GO
Filter by publication date
From:
October, 2006
Until:
Today
Filter by section
 
 
Salmonella enterica: A subgenus of Salmonella containing several medically important serotypes. The habitat for the majority of strains is warm-blooded animals.
 JoVE Immunology and Infection

High-throughput Assay to Phenotype Salmonella enterica Typhimurium Association, Invasion, and Replication in Macrophages

1Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University, 2Department of Microbial and Molecular Pathogenesis, College of Medicine, Texas A&M University System Health Science Center, 3University of California, Irvine, 4Department of Medical Microbiology & Immunology, School of Medicine, University of California, Davis


JoVE 51759

 JoVE Immunology and Infection

Glass Wool Filters for Concentrating Waterborne Viruses and Agricultural Zoonotic Pathogens

1Wisconsin Water Science Center, United States Geological Survey, 2University of Wisconsin – Madison, 3Agricultural Research Service, United States Department of Agriculture, 4Alaska Science Center, United States Geological Survey


JoVE 3930

 JoVE Bioengineering

Analyzing Cellular Internalization of Nanoparticles and Bacteria by Multi-spectral Imaging Flow Cytometry

1Department of Veterinary Microbiology and Preventive Medicine, Iowa State University, 2Amnis Corporation, 3Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Iowa State University


JoVE 3884

 JoVE Immunology and Infection

Electroporation of Functional Bacterial Effectors into Mammalian Cells

1Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 2Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 3Structural Proteomics Group, Ontario Center for Structural Proteomics, University of Toronto, 4Center for Bioproducts and Bioenergy, Washington State University


JoVE 52296

 JoVE Biology

Preparation, Imaging, and Quantification of Bacterial Surface Motility Assays

1Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, University of Notre Dame, 2Eck Institute for Global Health, University of Notre Dame, 3Department of Applied and Computational Mathematics and Statistics, University of Notre Dame, 4INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier, 5Department of Biology, Indiana University, 6Department of Biological Sciences, University of Notre Dame


JoVE 52338

 JoVE Environment

Colorimetric Paper-based Detection of Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp., and Listeria monocytogenes from Large Volumes of Agricultural Water

1Department of Animal Science, University of Wyoming, 2Department of Chemistry, Colorado State University, 3Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences, Colorado State University, 4Department of Animal Sciences, Colorado State University, 5Department of Plant Sciences, University of California, Davis, 6Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Citrus Research and Education Center, University of Florida, 7Department of Food Science and Agricultural Chemistry, McGill University


JoVE 51414

 JoVE Immunology and Infection

Measuring Growth and Gene Expression Dynamics of Tumor-Targeted S. Typhimurium Bacteria

1Health Sciences and Technology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2Department of Bioengineering, University of California, San Diego, 3Biocircuits Institute, University of California, San Diego, 4Molecular Biology Section, Division of Biological Science, University of California, San Diego, 5Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, 6Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, 7Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and David H. Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 8Howard Hughes Medical Institute


JoVE 50540

 JoVE Bioengineering

The Portable Chemical Sterilizer (PCS), D-FENS, and D-FEND ALL: Novel Chlorine Dioxide Decontamination Technologies for the Military

1United States Army-Natick Soldier RD&E Center, Warfighter Directorate, 2Department of Molecular Biology and Biophysics, University of Connecticut Health Center, 3Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 4Children's Hospital Oakland Research Institute


JoVE 4354

Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
 JoVE Immunology and Infection

The Ex Vivo Culture and Pattern Recognition Receptor Stimulation of Mouse Intestinal Organoids

1Department of Biomedical Sciences and Pathobiology, Virginia Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine, Virginia Tech, 2Department of Biomedical Engineering, Cornell University, 3School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Cornell University, 4Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University


JoVE 54033

Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
 Science Education: Essentials of Environmental Microbiology

Algae Enumeration via Culturable Methodology

JoVE Science Education

Source: Laboratories of Dr. Ian Pepper and Dr. Charles Gerba - Arizona University
Demonstrating Author: Bradley Schmitz

Algae are a highly heterogeneous group of microorganisms that have one common trait, namely the possession of photosynthetic pigments. In the environment, algae can cause problems for swimming pool owners by growing in the water. Algae can also cause problems in surface waters, such as lakes and reservoirs, due to algal blooms that release toxins. More recently, algae are being evaluated as novel sources of energy via algal biofuels. Blue-green algae are actually bacteria classified as cyanobacteria. Cyanobacteria not only photosynthesize, but also have the ability to fix nitrogen gas from the atmosphere. Other algae are eukaryotic, ranging from single-celled organisms to complex multicellular organisms, like seaweeds. These include the green algae, the euglenoids, the dinoflagellates, the golden brown algae, diatoms, the brown algae, and the red algae. In soils, algal populations are frequently 106 per gram. These numbers are lower than corresponding numbers for bacteria, actinomycetes, and fungi, mostly because the sunlight required for photosynthesis cannot penetrate far beneath the soil surface. Because algae are phototrophic, obtaining energy from photosyn

Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
12
More Results...
Waiting
simple hit counter