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 Science Education: Essentials of Environmental Science

Tree Survey: Point-Centered Quarter Sampling Method

JoVE Science Education

A number of methods are available for sampling forest communities. Point-centered quarter is one such method. It is used to gather information on the density, frequency, and coverage of tree species found in a forest. This information provides the ability to estimate the number of individual trees encountered, how often a certain tree occurs, how common the tree is compared to other trees, and the size of the tree. Compared to the standard plot analysis, the point-centered quarter method is more efficient, which is a major advantage. In a fixed-area plot sampling, a small portion of the total area of the forest is examined. In this small subsample, the density is determined directly by counting and identifying each tree. The ratio between size of the subplot and the overall forest size is used to determine the density for the entire forest.

 JoVE Bioengineering

Lignin Down-regulation of Zea mays via dsRNAi and Klason Lignin Analysis

1The School of Plant Sciences, University of Arizona, 2Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, DOE Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, Michigan State University, 3The Institute for Sustainable and Renewable Resources, The Institute for Advanced Learning and Research, 4Department of Plant, Soil and Microbial Sciences, Michigan State University


JoVE 51340

 Science Education: Essentials of General Chemistry

Determining the Mass Percent Composition in an Aqueous Solution

JoVE Science Education

Source: Laboratory of Dr. Neal Abrams — SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry

Determining the composition of a solution is an important analytical and forensic technique. When solutions are made with water, they are referred to as being aqueous, or containing water. The primary component of a solution is referred to as the solvent, and the dissolved minor component is called the solute. The solute is dissolved in the solvent to make a solution. Water is the most common solvent in everyday life, as well as nearly all biological systems. In chemistry labs, the solvent may be another liquid, like acetone, ether, or an alcohol. The solute can be a liquid or a solid, but this experiment only addressesthe determination of solids.

 JoVE Chemistry

Isolation and Preparation of Bacterial Cell Walls for Compositional Analysis by Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography

1Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, 2Department of Molecular Biology and Laboratory for Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research, Umeå University, 3Campus de Cantoblanco, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 4Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine


JoVE 51183

 JoVE Medicine

The α-test: Rapid Cell-free CD4 Enumeration Using Whole Saliva

1Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, 2Department of Oral Biology, University of Missouri-Kansas City-School of Dentistry, 3Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Missouri Kansas City- School of Pharmacy, 4Regional Hospital, Bamenda, NWP, Cameroon, 5Mezam Polyclinic HIV/AIDS Treatment Center, Cameroon, 6Institute for Human Genetics and Biochemistry


JoVE 3999

 JoVE Immunology and Infection

An Analytical Tool-box for Comprehensive Biochemical, Structural and Transcriptome Evaluation of Oral Biofilms Mediated by Mutans Streptococci

1Center for Oral Biology, University of Rochester Medical Center, 2State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Sichuan University, 3Department of General Medicine, Glostrup Hospital, Glostrup, Denmark, 4Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Rochester Medical Center


JoVE 2512

 JoVE Bioengineering

Time-lapse Fluorescence Imaging of Arabidopsis Root Growth with Rapid Manipulation of The Root Environment Using The RootChip

1Department of Plant Biology, Carnegie Institution for Science, 2Howard Hughes Medical Institute, 3Departments of Applied Physics and Bioengineering, Stanford University, 4Department of Microsystems Engineering (IMTEK) and Center for Biological Signaling Studies (BIOSS), University of Freiburg


JoVE 4290

 JoVE Biology

Glycan Profiling of Plant Cell Wall Polymers using Microarrays

1Australian Centre of Excellence in Plant Cell Walls, School of Botany, University of Melbourne, 2Plant Cell Biology Research Centre, School of Botany, University of Melbourne, 3CSIRO Plant Industry, Black Mountain Laboratories, 4Department of Plant Biology and Biotechnology, University of Copenhagen


JoVE 4238

 Science Education: Essentials of Organic Chemistry

Purifying Compounds by Recrystallization

JoVE Science Education

Source: Laboratory of Dr. Jimmy Franco - Merrimack College

Recrystallization is a technique used to purify solid compounds.1 Solids tend to be more soluble in hot liquids than in cold liquids. During recrystallization, an impure solid compound is dissolved in a hot liquid until the solution is saturated, and then the liquid is allowed to cool.2 The compound should then form relatively pure crystals. Ideally, any impurities that are present will remain in the solution and will not be incorporated into the growing crystals (Figure 1). The crystals can then be removed from the solution by filtration. Not all of the compound is recoverable — some will remain in the solution and will be lost. Recrystallization is not generally thought of as a separation technique; rather, it is a purification technique in which a small amount of an impurity is removed from a compound. However, if the solubility properties of two compounds are sufficiently different, recrystallization can be used to separate them, even if they are present in nearly equal amounts. Recrystallization works best when most impurities have already been removed by another method, such as extraction or column chromatography. Fi</span>…		</p>
		
	
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 JoVE Environment

Unraveling the Unseen Players in the Ocean - A Field Guide to Water Chemistry and Marine Microbiology

1Department of Biology, San Diego State University, 2Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California San Diego


JoVE 52131

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