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Tissue Extracts: Preparations made from animal tissues or organs (Animal structures). They usually contain many components, any one of which may be pharmacologically or physiologically active. Tissue extracts may contain specific, but uncharacterized factors or proteins with specific actions.
 JoVE Medicine

Confocal Time Lapse Imaging as an Efficient Method for the Cytocompatibility Evaluation of Dental Composites

1Laboratoire des Multimatériaux et Interfaces, UMR CNRS 5615, Université Lyon1, 2UFR d'Odontologie, Université Lyon1; Service de Consultations et de Traitements Dentaires, Hospices Civils de Lyon, 3UFR d'Odontologie, Université Paris Diderot; Service d'Odontologie, APHP, Hôpital Rothschild


JoVE 51949

 JoVE Chemistry

Deacetylation Assays to Unravel the Interplay between Sirtuins (SIRT2) and Specific Protein-substrates

1Laboratory for Molecular Cancer Biology, Department of Radiation Oncology, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, 2Department of Radiation Oncology, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University


JoVE 53563

 JoVE Medicine

Detection of Disease-associated α-synuclein by Enhanced ELISA in the Brain of Transgenic Mice Overexpressing Human A53T Mutated α-synuclein

1Neurodegenerative Diseases Unit, ANSES - French Agency for Food, Environmental and Occupational Health & Safety, 2Indicia Production, 3AJ Roboscreen GmbH, 4Epidemiology Unit, ANSES - French Agency for Food, Environmental and Occupational Health & Safety, 5Experimental Facilities, ANSES - French Agency for Food, Environmental and Occupational Health & Safety


JoVE 52752

 JoVE Environment

Transcript and Metabolite Profiling for the Evaluation of Tobacco Tree and Poplar as Feedstock for the Bio-based Industry

1Max Planck Institute for Molecular Plant Physiology, 2School of Biological Sciences, Plant Molecular Science, Centre for Systems and Synthetic Biology, Royal Holloway, University of London, 3Department of Plant Systems Biology, VIB, 4Department of Plant Biotechnology and Bioinformatics, UGhent, 5Institute for Building Materials, ETH Zurich, 6Applied Wood Materials, EMPA, 7Division of Glycoscience, School of Biotechnology, AlbaNova University Center, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), 8European Research and Project Office GmbH, 9ABBA Gaia S.L., 10Pflanzenöltechnologie, 11Capax Environmental Services, 12Green Fuels, 13Neutral Consulting Ltd, 14Plant Cell Biology Research Centre, School of Botany, University of Melbourne


JoVE 51393

 JoVE Biology

Glycan Profiling of Plant Cell Wall Polymers using Microarrays

1Australian Centre of Excellence in Plant Cell Walls, School of Botany, University of Melbourne, 2Plant Cell Biology Research Centre, School of Botany, University of Melbourne, 3CSIRO Plant Industry, Black Mountain Laboratories, 4Department of Plant Biology and Biotechnology, University of Copenhagen


JoVE 4238

 JoVE Biology

Protocols for Implementing an Escherichia coli Based TX-TL Cell-Free Expression System for Synthetic Biology

1Department of Biology, California Institute of Technology, 2Department of Bioengineering, California Institute of Technology, 3Synthetic Biology Center, Department of Bioengineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 4School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota


JoVE 50762

 JoVE Medicine

Induction of Invasive Transitional Cell Bladder Carcinoma in Immune Intact Human MUC1 Transgenic Mice: A Model for Immunotherapy Development

1Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Hematology and Oncology, University of California, Davis, 2Comparative Pathology Laboratory, UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, 3Merck Serono Research, Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany


JoVE 50868

 JoVE Bioengineering

Lignin Down-regulation of Zea mays via dsRNAi and Klason Lignin Analysis

1The School of Plant Sciences, University of Arizona, 2Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, DOE Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, Michigan State University, 3The Institute for Sustainable and Renewable Resources, The Institute for Advanced Learning and Research, 4Department of Plant, Soil and Microbial Sciences, Michigan State University


JoVE 51340

 Science Education: Essentials of Earth Science

Sonication Extraction of Lipid Biomarkers from Sediment

JoVE Science Education

Source: Laboratory of Jeff Salacup - University of Massachusetts Amherst

The material comprising the living "organic" share of any ecosystem (leaves, fungi, bark, tissue; Figure 1) differs fundamentally from the material of the non-living "inorganic" share (rocks and their constituent minerals, oxygen, water, metals). Organic material contains carbon linked to a series of other carbon and hydrogen molecules (Figure 2), which distinguishes it from inorganic material. Carbon's wide valency range (-4 to +4) allows it to form up to four separate covalent bonds with neighboring atoms, usually C, H, O, N, S, and P. It can also share up to three covalent bonds with a single other atom, such as the triple bond in the often-poisonous cyanide, or nitrile, group. Over the past 4.6 billion years, this flexibility has led to an amazing array of chemical structures, which vary in size, complexity, polarity, shape, and function. The scientific field of organic geochemistry is concerned with the identification and characterization of the whole range of detectable organic compounds, called biomarkers, produced by life on this planet, as we

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