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Pubmed Article
Trps1 regulates biliary epithelial-mesenchymal transition and has roles during biliary fibrosis in liver grafts: a preliminary study.
PUBLISHED: 04-18-2015
To investigate the role(s) of Trps1 in non-anastomotic biliary stricture (NABS) following liver transplantation.
Authors: Yu-Wen Chung-Davidson, Peter J. Davidson, Anne M. Scott, Erin J. Walaszczyk, Cory O. Brant, Tyler Buchinger, Nicholas S. Johnson, Weiming Li.
Published: 06-06-2014
Biliary atresia is a rare disease of infancy, with an estimated 1 in 15,000 frequency in the southeast United States, but more common in East Asian countries, with a reported frequency of 1 in 5,000 in Taiwan. Although much is known about the management of biliary atresia, its pathogenesis is still elusive. The sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) provides a unique opportunity to examine the mechanism and progression of biliary degeneration. Sea lamprey develop through three distinct life stages: larval, parasitic, and adult. During the transition from larvae to parasitic juvenile, sea lamprey undergo metamorphosis with dramatic reorganization and remodeling in external morphology and internal organs. In the liver, the entire biliary system is lost, including the gall bladder and the biliary tree. A newly-developed method called “CLARITY” was modified to clarify the entire liver and the junction with the intestine in metamorphic sea lamprey. The process of biliary degeneration was visualized and discerned during sea lamprey metamorphosis by using laser scanning confocal microscopy. This method provides a powerful tool to study biliary atresia in a unique animal model.
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Ex Situ Normothermic Machine Perfusion of Donor Livers
Authors: Negin Karimian, Alix P.M. Matton, Andrie C. Westerkamp, Laura C. Burlage, Sanna op den Dries, Henri G.D. Leuvenink, Ton Lisman, Korkut Uygun, James F. Markmann, Robert J. Porte.
Institutions: University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, and Shriners Burns Hospital, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School.
In contrast to conventional static cold preservation (0-4 °C), ex situ machine perfusion may provide better preservation of donor livers. Continuous perfusion of organs provides the opportunity to improve organ quality and allows ex situ viability assessment of donor livers prior to transplantation. This video article provides a step by step protocol for ex situ normothermic machine perfusion (37 °C) of human donor livers using a device that provides a pressure and temperature controlled pulsatile perfusion of the hepatic artery and continuous perfusion of the portal vein. The perfusion fluid is oxygenated by two hollow fiber membrane oxygenators and the temperature can be regulated between 10 °C and 37 °C. During perfusion, the metabolic activity of the liver as well as the degree of injury can be assessed by biochemical analysis of samples taken from the perfusion fluid. Machine perfusion is a very promising tool to increase the number of livers that are suitable for transplantation.
Medicine, Issue 99, Machine perfusion, liver transplantation, preservation, normothermic, hypothermic, human donor liver
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Heterotopic Auxiliary Rat Liver Transplantation With Flow-regulated Portal Vein Arterialization in Acute Hepatic Failure
Authors: Karina Schleimer, Johannes Kalder, Jochen Grommes, Houman Jalaie, Samir Tawadros, Andreas Greiner, Michael Jacobs, Maria Kokozidou.
Institutions: University Hospital RWTH Aachen.
In acute hepatic failure auxiliary liver transplantation is an interesting alternative approach. The aim is to provide a temporary support until the failing native liver has regenerated.1-3 The APOLT-method, the orthotopic implantation of auxiliary segments- averts most of the technical problems. However this method necessitates extensive resections of both the native liver and the graft.4 In 1998, Erhard developed the heterotopic auxiliary liver transplantation (HALT) utilizing portal vein arterialization (PVA) (Figure 1). This technique showed promising initial clinical results.5-6 We developed a HALT-technique with flow-regulated PVA in the rat to examine the influence of flow-regulated PVA on graft morphology and function (Figure 2). A liver graft reduced to 30 % of its original size, was heterotopically implanted in the right renal region of the recipient after explantation of the right kidney.  The infra-hepatic caval vein of the graft was anastomosed with the infrahepatic caval vein of the recipient. The arterialization of the donor’s portal vein was carried out via the recipient’s right renal artery with the stent technique. The blood-flow regulation of the arterialized portal vein was achieved with the use of a stent with an internal diameter of 0.3 mm. The celiac trunk of the graft was end-to-side anastomosed with the recipient’s aorta and the bile duct was implanted into the duodenum. A subtotal resection of the native liver was performed to induce acute hepatic failure. 7 In this manner 112 transplantations were performed. The perioperative survival rate was 90% and the 6-week survival rate was 80%. Six weeks after operation, the native liver regenerated, showing an increase in weight from 2.3±0.8 g to 9.8±1 g. At this time, the graft’s weight decreased from 3.3±0.8 g to 2.3±0.8 g. We were able to obtain promising long-term results in terms of graft morphology and function. HALT with flow-regulated PVA reliably bridges acute hepatic failure until the native liver regenerates.
Medicine, Issue 91, auxiliary liver transplantation, rat, portal vein arterialization, flow-regulation, acute hepatic failure
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Surgical Procedures for a Rat Model of Partial Orthotopic Liver Transplantation with Hepatic Arterial Reconstruction
Authors: Kazuyuki Nagai, Shintaro Yagi, Shinji Uemoto, Rene H. Tolba.
Institutions: RWTH-Aachen University, Kyoto University .
Orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) in rats using a whole or partial graft is an indispensable experimental model for transplantation research, such as studies on graft preservation and ischemia-reperfusion injury 1,2, immunological responses 3,4, hemodynamics 5,6, and small-for-size syndrome 7. The rat OLT is among the most difficult animal models in experimental surgery and demands advanced microsurgical skills that take a long time to learn. Consequently, the use of this model has been limited. Since the reliability and reproducibility of results are key components of the experiments in which such complex animal models are used, it is essential for surgeons who are involved in rat OLT to be trained in well-standardized and sophisticated procedures for this model. While various techniques and modifications of OLT in rats have been reported 8 since the first model was described by Lee et al. 9 in 1973, the elimination of the hepatic arterial reconstruction 10 and the introduction of the cuff anastomosis technique by Kamada et al. 11 were a major advancement in this model, because they simplified the reconstruction procedures to a great degree. In the model by Kamada et al., the hepatic rearterialization was also eliminated. Since rats could survive without hepatic arterial flow after liver transplantation, there was considerable controversy over the value of hepatic arterialization. However, the physiological superiority of the arterialized model has been increasingly acknowledged, especially in terms of preserving the bile duct system 8,12 and the liver integrity 8,13,14. In this article, we present detailed surgical procedures for a rat model of OLT with hepatic arterial reconstruction using a 50% partial graft after ex vivo liver resection. The reconstruction procedures for each vessel and the bile duct are performed by the following methods: a 7-0 polypropylene continuous suture for the supra- and infrahepatic vena cava; a cuff technique for the portal vein; and a stent technique for the hepatic artery and the bile duct.
Medicine, Issue 73, Biomedical Engineering, Anatomy, Physiology, Immunology, Surgery, liver transplantation, liver, hepatic, partial, orthotopic, split, rat, graft, transplantation, microsurgery, procedure, clinical, technique, artery, arterialization, arterialized, anastomosis, reperfusion, rat, animal model
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The C-seal: A Biofragmentable Drain Protecting the Stapled Colorectal Anastomosis from Leakage
Authors: Annelien N. Morks, Klaas Havenga, Henk O. ten Cate Hoedemaker, Rutger J. Ploeg.
Institutions: University Medical Center Groningen.
Colorectal anastomotic leakage (AL) is a serious complication in colorectal surgery leading to high morbidity and mortality rates1. The incidence of AL varies between 2.5 and 20% 2-5. Over the years, many strategies aimed at lowering the incidence of anastomotic leakage have been examined6, 7. The cause of AL is probably multifactorial. Etiological factors include insufficient arterial blood supply, tension on the anastomosis, hematoma and/or infection at the anastomotic site, and co-morbid factors of the patient as diabetes and atherosclerosis8. Furthermore, some anastomoses may be insufficient from the start due to technical failure. Currently a new device is developed in our institute aimed at protecting the colorectal anastomosis and lowering the incidence of AL. This so called C-seal is a biofragmentable drain, which is stapled to the anastomosis with the circular stapler. It covers the luminal side of the colorectal anastomosis thereby preventing leakage. The C-seal is a thin-walled tube-like drain, with an approximate diameter of 4 cm and an approximate length of 25 cm (figure 1). It is a tubular device composed of biodegradable polyurethane. Two flaps with adhesive tape are found at one end of the tube. These flaps are used to attach the C-seal to the anvil of the circular stapler, so that after the anastomosis is made the C-seal can be pulled through the anus. The C-seal remains in situ for at least 10 days. Thereafter it will lose strength and will degrade to be secreted from the body together with the gastrointestinal natural contents. The C-seal does not prevent the formation of dehiscences. However, it prevents extravasation of faeces into the peritoneal cavity. This means that a gap at the anastomotic site does not lead to leakage. Currently, a phase II study testing the C-seal in 35 patients undergoing (colo-)rectal resection with stapled anastomosis is recruiting. The C-seal can be used in both open procedures as well as laparoscopic procedures. The C-seal is only applied in stapled anastomoses within 15cm from the anal verge. In the video, application of the C-seal is shown in an open extended sigmoid resection in a patient suffering from diverticular disease with a stenotic colon.
Medicine, Issue 45, Surgery, low anterior resection, colorectal anastomosis, anastomotic leakage, drain, rectal cancer, circular stapler
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Technique of Porcine Liver Procurement and Orthotopic Transplantation using an Active Porto-Caval Shunt
Authors: Vinzent N. Spetzler, Nicolas Goldaracena, Jan M. Knaak, Kristine S. Louis, Nazia Selzner, Markus Selzner.
Institutions: Toronto General Hospital.
The success of liver transplantation has resulted in a dramatic organ shortage. Each year, a considerable number of patients on the liver transplantation waiting list die without receiving an organ transplant or are delisted due to disease progression. Even after a successful transplantation, rejection and side effects of immunosuppression remain major concerns for graft survival and patient morbidity. Experimental animal research has been essential to the success of liver transplantation and still plays a pivotal role in the development of clinical transplantation practice. In particular, the porcine orthotopic liver transplantation model (OLTx) is optimal for clinically oriented research for its close resemblance to human size, anatomy, and physiology. Decompression of intestinal congestion during the anhepatic phase of porcine OLTx is important to guarantee reliable animal survival. The use of an active porto-caval-jugular shunt achieves excellent intestinal decompression. The system can be used for short-term as well as long-term survival experiments. The following protocol contains all technical information for a stable and reproducible liver transplantation model in pigs including post-operative animal care.
Medicine, Issue 99, Orthotopic Liver Transplantation, Hepatic, Porcine Model, Pig, Experimental, Transplantation, Graft Preservation, Ischemia Reperfusion Injury, Transplant Immunology, Bile Duct Reconstruction, Animal Handling
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Bile Duct Ligation in Mice: Induction of Inflammatory Liver Injury and Fibrosis by Obstructive Cholestasis
Authors: Carmen G. Tag, Sibille Sauer-Lehnen, Sabine Weiskirchen, Erawan Borkham-Kamphorst, René H. Tolba, Frank Tacke, Ralf Weiskirchen.
Institutions: RWTH Aachen University, RWTH Aachen University, RWTH Aachen University.
In most vertebrates, the liver produces bile that is necessary to emulsify absorbed fats and enable the digestion of lipids in the small intestine as well as to excrete bilirubin and other metabolic products. In the liver, the experimental obstruction of the extrahepatic biliary system initiates a complex cascade of pathological events that leads to cholestasis and inflammation resulting in a strong fibrotic reaction originating from the periportal fields. Therefore, surgical ligation of the common bile duct has become the most commonly used model to induce obstructive cholestatic injury in rodents and to study the molecular and cellular events that underlie these pathophysiological mechanisms induced by inappropriate bile flow. In recent years, different surgical techniques have been described that either allow reconnection or reanastomosis after bile duct ligation (BDL), e.g., partial BDL, or other microsurgical methods for specific research questions. However, the most frequently used model is the complete obstruction of the common bile duct that induces a strong fibrotic response after 21 to 28 days. The mortality rate can be high due to infectious complications or technical inaccuracies. Here we provide a detailed surgical procedure for the BDL model in mice that induce a highly reproducible fibrotic response in accordance to the 3R rule for animal welfare postulated by Russel and Burch in 1959.
Medicine, Issue 96, bile duct ligation, cholestasis, bile obstruction, hepatic fibrosis, inflammation, extracellular matrix, jaundice, mouse
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Utilizing the Antigen Capsid-Incorporation Strategy for the Development of Adenovirus Serotype 5-Vectored Vaccine Approaches
Authors: Linlin Gu, Anitra L. Farrow, Alexandre Krendelchtchikov, Qiana L. Matthews.
Institutions: University of Alabama at Birmingham, University of Alabama at Birmingham.
Adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) has been extensively modified with traditional transgene methods for the vaccine development. The reduced efficacies of these traditionally modified Ad5 vectors in clinical trials could be primarily correlated with Ad5 pre-existing immunity (PEI) among the majority of the population. To promote Ad5-vectored vaccine development by solving the concern of Ad5 PEI, the innovative Antigen Capsid-Incorporation strategy has been employed. By merit of this strategy, Ad5-vectored we first constructed the hexon shuttle plasmid HVR1-KWAS-HVR5-His6/pH5S by subcloning the hypervariable region (HVR) 1 of hexon into a previously constructed shuttle plasmid HVR5-His6/pH5S, which had His6 tag incorporated into the HVR5. This HVR1 DNA fragment containing a HIV epitope ELDKWAS was synthesized. HVR1-KWAS-HVR5-His6/pH5S was then linearized and co-transformed with linearized backbone plasmid pAd5/∆H5 (GL) , for homologous recombination. This recombined plasmid pAd5/H5-HVR1-KWAS-HVR5-His6 was transfected into cells to generate the viral vector Ad5/H5-HVR1-KWAS-HVR5-His6. This vector was validated to have qualitative fitness indicated by viral physical titer (VP/ml), infectious titer (IP/ml) and corresponding VP/IP ratio. Both the HIV epitope and His6 tag were surface-exposed on the Ad5 capsid, and retained epitope-specific antigenicity of their own. A neutralization assay indicated the ability of this divalent vector to circumvent neutralization by Ad5-positive sera in vitro. Mice immunization demonstrated the generation of robust humoral immunity specific to the HIV epitope and His6. This proof-of-principle study suggested that the protocol associated with the Antigen Capsid-Incorporation strategy could be feasibly utilized for the generation of Ad5-vectored vaccines by modifying different capsid proteins. This protocol could even be further modified for the generation of rare-serotype adenovirus-vectored vaccines.
Immunology, Issue 99, Antigen Capsid-Incorporation strategy, transgene method, Adenovirus (Ad), vaccine, capsid proteins, dual modification, pre-existing immunity (PEI)
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Functional Human Liver Preservation and Recovery by Means of Subnormothermic Machine Perfusion
Authors: Bote G. Bruinsma, James H. Avruch, Pepijn D. Weeder, Gautham V. Sridharan, Basak E. Uygun, Negin G. Karimian, Robert J. Porte, James F. Markmann, Heidi Yeh, Korkut Uygun.
Institutions: Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen.
There is currently a severe shortage of liver grafts available for transplantation. Novel organ preservation techniques are needed to expand the pool of donor livers. Machine perfusion of donor liver grafts is an alternative to traditional cold storage of livers and holds much promise as a modality to expand the donor organ pool. We have recently described the potential benefit of subnormothermic machine perfusion of human livers. Machine perfused livers showed improving function and restoration of tissue ATP levels. Additionally, machine perfusion of liver grafts at subnormothermic temperatures allows for objective assessment of the functionality and suitability of a liver for transplantation. In these ways a great many livers that were previously discarded due to their suboptimal quality can be rescued via the restorative effects of machine perfusion and utilized for transplantation. Here we describe this technique of subnormothermic machine perfusion in detail. Human liver grafts allocated for research are perfused via the hepatic artery and portal vein with an acellular oxygenated perfusate at 21 °C.
Medicine, Issue 98, Liver, transplantation, organ preservation, subnormothermic, machine perfusion, viability
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Isolation of Neonatal Extrahepatic Cholangiocytes
Authors: Sara Karjoo, Rebecca G. Wells.
Institutions: The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, The Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.
The intra and extrahepatic bile ducts of the liver are developmentally distinct, and may be differentially affected by certain diseases. However, differences between intra and extrahepatic cholangiocytes, and between neonatal and adult cells, are not well understood. Methods for the isolation of cholangiocytes from intrahepatic bile ducts are well established1-4. Isolation of extrahepatic ductal cells, especially from the neonate, has not yet been described, although this would be of great benefit in understanding the differences between distinct cholangiocyte populations and in studying diseases such as biliary atresia that appear to target the extrahepatic ducts. Described here is an optimized technique to isolate both neonatal and adult mouse extrahepatic bile duct cells. This technique yields a pure cell population with minimal contamination from mesenchymal cells like fibroblasts. This method is based on the removal of the extrahepatic ducts and gallbladder, followed by meticulous dissection and scraping to remove fat and fibroblast layers. Structures are embedded in thick layers of collagen and cultured for approximately 3 weeks to allow outgrowth of cholangiocytes in monolayers, which can then be trypsinized and re plated for experimental use.
Medicine, Issue 88, Bile Ducts, Bile Ducts, Extrahepatic, Common Bile Duct, Bile Duct Diseases, Cell culture, bile duct, biliary atresia, Liver, gallbladder, fibrosis
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Murine Heterotopic Heart Transplant Technique
Authors: Robert J. Plenter, Todd J. Grazia.
Institutions: University of Colorado Denver.
It is now over forty years since this technique was first reported by Corry, Wynn and Russell. Although it took some years for other labs to become proficient in and utilize this technique, it is now widely used by many laboratories around the world. A significant refinement to the original technique was developed and reported in 2001 by Niimi. Described here are the techniques that have evolved over more than a decade in the hands of three surgeons (Plenter, Grazia, Pietra) in our center. These techniques are now being passed on to a younger generation of surgeons and researchers. Based largely on the Niimi experience, the procedures used have evolved in the fine details - details which we will endeavor to relate here in such a way that others may be able to use this very useful model. Like Niimi, we have found that a video aid to learning is a priceless resource for the beginner.
Medicine, Issue 89, Heart Transplantation, Transplantation Immunology, Graft Rejection, Cardiac, Transplant, Mouse, Immunology, Rejection, Surgery
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Technique of Subnormothermic Ex Vivo Liver Perfusion for the Storage, Assessment, and Repair of Marginal Liver Grafts
Authors: Jan M. Knaak, Vinzent N. Spetzler, Nicolas Goldaracena, Kristine S. Louis, Nazia Selzner, Markus Selzner.
Institutions: Toronto General Hospital, Toronto General Hospital, Toronto General Hospital.
The success of liver transplantation has resulted in a dramatic organ shortage. In most transplant regions 20-30% of patients on the waiting list for liver transplantation die without receiving an organ transplant or are delisted for disease progression. One strategy to increase the donor pool is the utilization of marginal grafts, such as fatty livers, grafts from older donors, or donation after cardiac death (DCD). The current preservation technique of cold static storage is only poorly tolerated by marginal livers resulting in significant organ damage. In addition, cold static organ storage does not allow graft assessment or repair prior to transplantation. These shortcomings of cold static preservation have triggered an interest in warm perfused organ preservation to reduce cold ischemic injury, assess liver grafts during preservation, and explore the opportunity to repair marginal livers prior to transplantation. The optimal pressure and flow conditions, perfusion temperature, composition of the perfusion solution and the need for an oxygen carrier has been controversial in the past. In spite of promising results in several animal studies, the complexity and the costs have prevented a broader clinical application so far. Recently, with enhanced technology and a better understanding of liver physiology during ex vivo perfusion the outcome of warm liver perfusion has improved and consistently good results can be achieved. This paper will provide information about liver retrieval, storage techniques, and isolated liver perfusion in pigs. We will illustrate a) the requirements to ensure sufficient oxygen supply to the organ, b) technical considerations about the perfusion machine and the perfusion solution, and c) biochemical aspects of isolated organs.
Medicine, Issue 90, ex vivo liver perfusion, marginal grafts, DCD
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Manufacturing Devices and Instruments for Easier Rat Liver Transplantation
Authors: Graziano Oldani, Stephanie Lacotte, Lorenzo Orci, Philippe Morel, Gilles Mentha, Christian Toso.
Institutions: University of Geneva Hospitals, University of Pavia , University of Geneva, University of Geneva Hospitals.
Orthotopic rat liver transplantation is a popular model, which has been shown in a recent JoVE paper with the use of the "quick-linker" device. This technique allows for easier venous cuff-anatomoses after a reasonable learning curve. The device is composed of two handles, which are carved out from scalpel blades, one approximator, which is obtained by modifying Kocher's forceps, and cuffs designed from fine-bore polyethylene tubing. The whole process can be performed at a low-cost using common laboratory material. The present report provides a step-by-step protocol for the design of the required pieces and includes stencils.
Medicine, Issue 75, Biomedical Engineering, Bioengineering, Mechanical Engineering, Anatomy, Physiology, Surgery, Tissue Engineering, Liver Transplantation, Liver, transplantation, rat, quick-linker, orthotopic, graft, cuff, clinical techniques, animal model
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Mouse Models for Graft Arteriosclerosis
Authors: Lingfeng Qin, Luyang Yu, Wang Min.
Institutions: Yale University School of Medicine , Yale University School of Medicine .
Graft arteriosclerois (GA), also called allograft vasculopathy, is a pathologic lesion that develops over months to years in transplanted organs characterized by diffuse, circumferential stenosis of the entire graft vascular tree. The most critical component of GA pathogenesis is the proliferation of smooth muscle-like cells within the intima. When a human coronary artery segment is interposed into the infra-renal aortae of immunodeficient mice, the intimas could be expand in response to adoptively transferred human T cells allogeneic to the artery donor or exogenous human IFN-γ in the absence of human T cells. Interposition of a mouse aorta from one strain into another mouse strain recipient is limited as a model for chronic rejection in humans because the acute cell-mediated rejection response in this mouse model completely eliminates all donor-derived vascular cells from the graft within two-three weeks. We have recently developed two new mouse models to circumvent these problems. The first model involves interposition of a vessel segment from a male mouse into a female recipient of the same inbred strain (C57BL/6J). Graft rejection in this case is directed only against minor histocompatibility antigens encoded by the Y chromosome (present in the male but not the female) and the rejection response that ensues is sufficiently indolent to preserve donor-derived smooth muscle cells for several weeks. The second model involves interposing an artery segment from a wild type C57BL/6J mouse donor into a host mouse of the same strain and gender that lacks the receptor for IFN-γ followed by administration of mouse IFN-γ (delivered via infection of the mouse liver with an adenoviral vector. There is no rejection in this case as both donor and recipient mice are of the same strain and gender but donor smooth muscle cells proliferate in response to the cytokine while host-derived cells, lacking receptor for this cytokine, are unresponsive. By backcrossing additional genetic changes into the vessel donor, both models can be used to assess the effect of specific genes on GA progression. Here, we describe detailed protocols for our mouse GA models.
Medicine, Issue 75, Anatomy, Physiology, Biomedical Engineering, Bioengineering, Cardiology, Pathology, Surgery, Tissue Engineering, Cardiovascular Diseases, vascular biology, graft arteriosclerosis, GA, mouse models, transplantation, graft, vessels, arteries, mouse, animal model, surgical techniques
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Orthotopic Liver Transplantation in Rats
Authors: Graziano Oldani, Stephanie Lacotte, Philippe Morel, Gilles Mentha, Christian Toso.
Institutions: University of Geneva Hospitals, University of Pavia , University of Geneva, University of Geneva Hospitals.
Clinical progress in the field of liver transplantation has been largely supported by animal models1,2. Since the publication of the first orthotopic rat liver transplantation in 1979 by Kamada et al.3, this model has remained the gold standard despite various proposed alternative techniques4. Nevertheless, its broader use is limited by its steep learning curve5. In this video paper, we show a simple and easy-to-establish revision of Kamada's two-cuff technique. The suprahepatic vena cava anastomosis is performed manually with a running suture, and the vena porta and infrahepatic vena cava anastomoses are performed utilizing a quick-linker cuff system6. Manufacturing the quick-linker kit is shown in a separate video paper.
Medicine, Issue 65, Physiology, Liver, transplantation, rat, rodents, orthotopic, graft, cuff, surgery
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Isolation of Rat Portal Fibroblasts by In situ Liver Perfusion
Authors: Jessica W. Wen, Abby L. Olsen, Maryna Perepelyuk, Rebecca G. Wells.
Institutions: The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania .
Liver fibrosis is defined by the excessive deposition of extracellular matrix by activated myofibroblasts. There are multiple precursors of hepatic myofibroblasts, including hepatic stellate cells, portal fibroblasts and bone marrow derived fibroblasts 1. Hepatic stellate cells have been the best studied, but portal fibroblasts are increasingly recognized as important contributors to the myofibroblast pool, particularly in biliary fibrosis 2. Portal fibroblasts undergo proliferation in response to biliary epithelial injury, potentially playing a key role in the early stages of biliary scarring 3-5. A method of isolating portal fibroblasts would allow in vitro study of this cell population and lead to greater understanding of the role portal fibroblasts play in biliary fibrosis. Portal fibroblasts have been isolated using various techniques including outgrowth 6, 7 and liver perfusion with enzymatic digestion followed by size selection 8. The advantage of the digestion and size selection technique compared to the outgrowth technique is that cells can be studied without the necessity of passage in culture. Here, we describe a modified version of the original technique described by Kruglov and Dranoff 8 for isolation of portal fibroblasts from rat liver that results in a relatively pure population of primary cells.
Physiology, Issue 64, Medicine, Liver, fibrosis, portal fibroblast, liver perfusion, myofibroblast, biliary fibrosis
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Creation of Reversible Cholestatic Rat Model
Authors: Gokulakkrishna Subhas, Jasneet Bhullar, Vijay K. Mittal, Michael J. Jacobs.
Institutions: Providence Hospital and Medical Centers.
Cholestasis is a clinical condition commonly encountered by both surgeons and gastroenterologists. Cholestasis can cause various physiological changes and affect the nutritional status and surgical outcomes. Study of the pathophysiological changes occurring in the liver and other organs is of importance. Various studies have been done in cholestatic rat models. We used a reversible cholestatic rat model in our recent study looking at the role of methylprednisolone in the ischemia reperfusion injury. Various techniques for creation of a reversible cholestatic model have been described. Creation of a reversible cholestatic rat model can be challenging in view of the smaller size and unique hepatopancreatobiliary anatomy in rats. This video article demonstrates the creation of a reversible cholestatic model. This model can be used in various studies, such as looking at the changes in nutritional, physiological, pathological, histological and immunological changes in the gastrointestinal tract. This model can also be used to see the effects of cholestasis and various therapeutic interventions on major hepatic surgeries.
Medicine, Issue 51, Cholestasis, Rat model, Reversible cholestasis, Choledochoduodenostomy, Bile duct obstruction, Cholestasis
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Hepatocyte-specific Ablation in Zebrafish to Study Biliary-driven Liver Regeneration
Authors: Tae-Young Choi, Mehwish Khaliq, Sungjin Ko, Juhoon So, Donghun Shin.
Institutions: University of Pittsburgh.
The liver has a great capacity to regenerate. Hepatocytes, the parenchymal cells of the liver, can regenerate in one of two ways: hepatocyte- or biliary-driven liver regeneration. In hepatocyte-driven liver regeneration, regenerating hepatocytes are derived from preexisting hepatocytes, whereas, in biliary-driven regeneration, regenerating hepatocytes are derived from biliary epithelial cells (BECs). For hepatocyte-driven liver regeneration, there are excellent rodent models that have significantly contributed to the current understanding of liver regeneration. However, no such rodent model exists for biliary-driven liver regeneration. We recently reported on a zebrafish liver injury model in which BECs extensively give rise to hepatocytes upon severe hepatocyte loss. In this model, hepatocytes are specifically ablated by a pharmacogenetic means. Here we present in detail the methods to ablate hepatocytes and to analyze the BEC-driven liver regeneration process. This hepatocyte-specific ablation model can be further used to discover the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms of biliary-driven liver regeneration. Moreover, these methods can be applied to chemical screens to identify small molecules that augment or suppress liver regeneration.
Developmental Biology, Issue 99, nitroreductase, metronidazole, biliary epithelial cells, hepatocytes, zebrafish, liver regeneration, cell ablation, transgenic
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.