In JoVE (1)

Other Publications (5)

Articles by Christiane Klec in JoVE

 JoVE Biology

Application of Genetically Encoded Fluorescent Nitric Oxide (NO•) Probes, the geNOps, for Real-time Imaging of NO• Signals in Single Cells

1Institute of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Medical University of Graz


JoVE 55486

Other articles by Christiane Klec on PubMed

TRPV1 Mediates Cellular Uptake of Anandamide and Thus Promotes Endothelial Cell Proliferation and Network-formation

Biology Open. Nov, 2014  |  Pubmed ID: 25395667

Anandamide (N-arachidonyl ethanolamide, AEA) is an endogenous cannabinoid that is involved in various pathological conditions, including cardiovascular diseases and tumor-angiogenesis. Herein, we tested the involvement of classical cannabinoid receptors (CBRs) and the Ca(2+)-channel transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) on cellular AEA uptake and its effect on endothelial cell proliferation and network-formation. Uptake of the fluorescence-labeled anandamide (SKM4-45-1) was monitored in human endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) and a human endothelial-vein cell line (EA.hy926). Involvement of the receptors during AEA translocation was determined by selective pharmacological inhibition (AM251, SR144528, CID16020046, SB366791) and molecular interference by TRPV1-selective siRNA-mediated knock-down and TRPV1 overexpression. We show that exclusively TRPV1 contributes essentially to AEA transport into endothelial cells in a Ca(2+)-independent manner. This TRPV1 function is a prerequisite for AEA-induced endothelial cell proliferation and network-formation. Our findings point to a so far unknown moonlighting function of TRPV1 as Ca(2+)-independent contributor/regulator of AEA uptake. We propose TRPV1 as representing a promising target for development of pharmacological therapies against AEA-triggered endothelial cell functions, including their stimulatory effect on tumor-angiogenesis.

Generation of Red-Shifted Cameleons for Imaging Ca²⁺ Dynamics of the Endoplasmic Reticulum

Sensors (Basel, Switzerland). Jun, 2015  |  Pubmed ID: 26053751

Cameleons are sophisticated genetically encoded fluorescent probes that allow quantifying cellular Ca2+ signals. The probes are based on Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between terminally located fluorescent proteins (FPs), which move together upon binding of Ca2+ to the central calmodulin myosin light chain kinase M13 domain. Most of the available cameleons consist of cyan and yellow FPs (CFP and YFP) as the FRET pair. However, red-shifted versions with green and orange or red FPs (GFP, OFP, RFP) have some advantages such as less phototoxicity and minimal spectral overlay with autofluorescence of cells and fura-2, a prominent chemical Ca2+ indicator. While GFP/OFP- or GFP/RFP-based cameleons have been successfully used to study cytosolic and mitochondrial Ca2+ signals, red-shifted cameleons to visualize Ca2+ dynamics of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) have not been developed so far. In this study, we generated and tested several ER targeted red-shifted cameleons. Our results show that GFP/OFP-based cameleons due to miss-targeting and their high Ca2+ binding affinity are inappropriate to record ER Ca2+ signals. However, ER targeted GFP/RFP-based probes were suitable to sense ER Ca2+ in a reliable manner. With this study we increased the palette of cameleons for visualizing Ca2+ dynamics within the main intracellular Ca2+ store.

Rearrangement of MICU1 Multimers for Activation of MCU is Solely Controlled by Cytosolic Ca(2.)

Scientific Reports. Oct, 2015  |  Pubmed ID: 26489515

Mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake is a vital process that controls distinct cell and organelle functions. Mitochondrial calcium uptake 1 (MICU1) was identified as key regulator of the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter (MCU) that together with the essential MCU regulator (EMRE) forms the mitochondrial Ca(2+) channel. However, mechanisms by which MICU1 controls MCU/EMRE activity to tune mitochondrial Ca(2+) signals remain ambiguous. Here we established a live-cell FRET approach and demonstrate that elevations of cytosolic Ca(2+) rearranges MICU1 multimers with an EC50 of 4.4 μM, resulting in activation of mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake. MICU1 rearrangement essentially requires the EF-hand motifs and strictly correlates with the shape of cytosolic Ca(2+) rises. We further show that rearrangements of MICU1 multimers were independent of matrix Ca(2+) concentration, mitochondrial membrane potential, and expression levels of MCU and EMRE. Our experiments provide novel details about how MCU/EMRE is regulated by MICU1 and an original approach to investigate MCU/EMRE activation in intact cells.

Resveratrol Specifically Kills Cancer Cells by a Devastating Increase in the Ca2+ Coupling Between the Greatly Tethered Endoplasmic Reticulum and Mitochondria

Cellular Physiology and Biochemistry : International Journal of Experimental Cellular Physiology, Biochemistry, and Pharmacology. 2016  |  Pubmed ID: 27606689

Resveratrol and its derivate piceatannol are known to induce cancer cell-specific cell death. While multiple mechanisms of actions have been described including the inhibition of ATP synthase, changes in mitochondrial membrane potential and ROS levels, the exact mechanisms of cancer specificity of these polyphenols remain unclear. This paper is designed to reveal the molecular basis of the cancer-specific initiation of cell death by resveratrol and piceatannol.

PRMT1-mediated Methylation of MICU1 Determines the UCP2/3 Dependency of Mitochondrial Ca(2+) Uptake in Immortalized Cells

Nature Communications. Sep, 2016  |  Pubmed ID: 27642082

Recent studies revealed that mitochondrial Ca(2+) channels, which control energy flow, cell signalling and death, are macromolecular complexes that basically consist of the pore-forming mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter (MCU) protein, the essential MCU regulator (EMRE), and the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake 1 (MICU1). MICU1 is a regulatory subunit that shields mitochondria from Ca(2+) overload. Before the identification of these core elements, the novel uncoupling proteins 2 and 3 (UCP2/3) have been shown to be fundamental for mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake. Here we clarify the molecular mechanism that determines the UCP2/3 dependency of mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake. Our data demonstrate that mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake is controlled by protein arginine methyl transferase 1 (PRMT1) that asymmetrically methylates MICU1, resulting in decreased Ca(2+) sensitivity. UCP2/3 normalize Ca(2+) sensitivity of methylated MICU1 and, thus, re-establish mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake activity. These data provide novel insights in the complex regulation of the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter by PRMT1 and UCP2/3.

Waiting
simple hit counter