Sara Jane Czaja

Division of Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine

Weill Cornell Medicine

Sara J. Czaja
Professor

Sara J. Czaja is a Professor of Gerontology and the Director of the Center on Aging and Behavioral Research in the Division of Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine at Weill Cornell Medicine. She is also the Director of the NIH multi-site Center on Aging at the University of Miami and the Director of the Center on Research and Education for Aging and Technology Enhancement (CREATE). The focus of CREATE is on making technology more accessible, useful, and usable for older adult populations.

Dr. Czaja research interests include: aging and cognition, aging and social isolation, aging and healthcare access, family caregiving, aging and technology, and functional assessment. She has received continuous funding from the National Institutes of Health, Administration on Aging, National Science Foundation, the Markle and Langeloth Foundations to support her research for the past 35 years. She is currently the Principal Investigator of an NIH funded Program Project (CREATE), 3 NIH funded RO1s and a CO-I of an NIH funded SBIR. Dr. Czaja is very well published in the field of aging and has written numerous books, book chapters and scientific articles. Her contributions to the literature span Gerontology, Psychology, Engineering and Human-Computer Interaction, and Medicine.

She is a fellow of the American Psychological Association, the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society and the Gerontological Society of America. She served as a member of the Board on Human Systems Integration for the National Academy of Sciences Engineering and Medicine for two terms. She served on the NASEM committee on healthy cognitive aging and the NASEM committee on family caregivers for older adults. She has also received numerous awards for her research and scholarly activities.

Dr. Czaja is very active professionally. For example, she served as the President of Division 20 (Adult Development and Aging) of the American Psychological Association (APA) and as a member of the Executive Council of the Human Factors and Ergonomic Society. In addition, she is on the editorial board of several high impact journals (e.g., Innovations in Aging, Human Factors, The Gerontologist) and is a frequent member of study sections for the NIH.

Publications