Waiting
Login-Verarbeitung ...

Trial ends in Request Full Access Tell Your Colleague About Jove

3.9: Non-equilibrium in the Cell

TABLE OF
CONTENTS
JoVE Core
Cell Biology

Ein Abonnement für JoVE ist erforderlich, um diesen Inhalt ansehen zu können. Melden Sie sich an oder starten Sie Ihre kostenlose Testversion.

Education
Non-equilibrium in the Cell
 
TRANSCRIPT

3.9: Non-equilibrium in the Cell

An important concept in studying metabolism and energy is that of chemical equilibrium. Most chemical reactions are reversible. They can proceed in both directions, releasing energy into their environment in one direction, and absorbing it from the environment in the other direction. The same is true for the chemical reactions involved in cell metabolism, such as the breaking down and building up of proteins into and from individual amino acids, respectively. Reactants within a closed system will undergo chemical reactions in both directions until they reach a state of equilibrium, which is one of the lowest possible free energy and a state of maximal entropy. To push the reactants and products away from a state of equilibrium requires energy. Either reactants or products must be added, removed, or changed.

If a cell were a closed system, its chemical reactions would reach equilibrium, and it would die because there would be insufficient free energy left to perform the necessary work to maintain life. In a living cell, chemical reactions are constantly moving towards equilibrium, but never reach it. This is because a living cell is an open system. Materials pass in and out, the cell recycles the products of certain chemical reactions into other reactions, and there is never chemical equilibrium. In this way, living organisms are in a constant energy-requiring, uphill battle against equilibrium and entropy. This constant energy supply ultimately comes from sunlight, which produces nutrients in the photosynthesis process.

Steady state refers to the relatively stable internal environment required to maintain life. In order to function properly, cells require appropriate conditions such as proper temperature, pH, and appropriate concentration of diverse chemicals. These conditions may, however, change from one moment to the next. Organisms are able to maintain homeostatic internal conditions within a narrow range almost constantly, despite environmental changes, by activation of regulatory mechanisms. For example, an organism needs to regulate body temperature through the thermoregulation process.

This text is adapted from Openstax, Biology 2e, Section 6.2 Potential, Kinetic, Free, and Activation Energy Section and 1.2 Themes and Concepts of Biology.

Tags

Artificial Intelligence AI Writing Assistant Content Generation Copywriting AI-generated Content

Get cutting-edge science videos from JoVE sent straight to your inbox every month.

Waiting X
Simple Hit Counter