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October, 2006
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Absorbent Pads: Pads made of various materials used for personal hygiene usually for absorbing Urine or Feces. They can be worn as underpants or pants liners by various age groups, from Newborns to the Elderly. Absorbent pads can be made of fluff wood pulp and Hydrogel absorbent covered with viscose rayon, polyester, polypropylene, or Polyethylene coverstock.

Large-Scale Purification of Porcine or Bovine Photoreceptor Outer Segments for Phagocytosis Assays on Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells

1INSERM, U968, 2Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Paris 06, UMR_S 968, Institut de la Vision, 3CNRS, UMR_7210, 4Department of Biological Sciences, Center for Cancer, Genetic Diseases and Gene Regulation, Fordham University

JoVE 52100

 Immunology and Infection

Renal Capsule Xenografting and Subcutaneous Pellet Implantation for the Evaluation of Prostate Carcinogenesis and Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

1Department of Urology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2Medical Scientist (MD/PhD) Training Program, University of Rochester School of Medicine & Dentistry, 3Molecular and Environmental Toxicology Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison

JoVE 50574


Safe Handling of Mineral Acids

JoVE 10370

Source: Robert M. Rioux & Taslima A. Zaman, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA

A mineral acid (or inorganic acid) is defined as a water-soluble acid derived from inorganic minerals by chemical reaction as opposed to organic acids (e.g. acetic acid, formic acid). Examples of mineral acids include: • Boric acid (CAS No.10043-35-3) • Chromic acid (CAS No.1333-82-0) • Hydrochloric acid (CAS No.7647-01-0) • Hydrofluoric acid (CAS No. 7664-39-3) • Nitric acid (CAS No. 7697-37-2) • Perchloric acid (CAS No. 7601-90-3) • Phosphoric acid (CAS No.7664-38-2) • Sulfuric acid (CAS No.7664-93-9) Mineral acids are commonly found in research laboratories and their corrosive nature makes them a significant safety risk. Since they are important reagents in the research laboratory and often do not have substitutes, it is important that they are handled properly and with care. Some acids are even shock sensitive and under certain conditions may cause explosions (i.e., salts of perchloric acid).

 Lab Safety

Murine Full-thickness Skin Transplantation

1Sidney-Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 2Department of Liver and Transplantation Surgery, Chang-Gung Transplantation Institute, Chang-Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang-Gung University College of Medicine, 3Vascularized Composite Allotransplantation Laboratory, Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

JoVE 55105

 Immunology and Infection

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