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Adenosine Diphosphate: Adenosine 5'-(trihydrogen diphosphate). An adenine nucleotide containing two phosphate groups esterified to the sugar moiety at the 5'-position.

Hydrolysis of ATP

JoVE 10732

The bonds of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) can be broken through the addition of water, releasing one or two phosphate groups in an exergonic process called hydrolysis. This reaction liberates the energy in the bonds for use in the cell—for instance, to synthesize proteins from amino acids.

If one phosphate group is removed, a molecule of ADP—adenosine diphosphate—remains, along with inorganic phosphate. ADP can be further hydrolyzed to AMP—adenosine monophosphate—by the removal of a second phosphate group. ATP consists of an adenine base, a ribose sugar, and three phosphate groups, with the latter attached to each other through high-energy phosphoanhydride bonds.

 Core: Metabolism

Cellular Respiration- Concept

JoVE 10567

Autotrophs and Heterotrophs

Living organisms require a continuous input of energy to maintain cellular and organismal functions such as growth, repair, movement, defense, and reproduction. Cells can only use chemical energy to fuel their functions, therefore they need to harvest energy from chemical bonds of biomolecules, such as sugars and lipids. Autotrophic organisms, namely…

 Lab Bio

The Calvin Cycle

JoVE 10753

Oxygenic photosynthesis converts approximately 200 billion tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) annually to organic compounds and produces approximately 140 billion tons of atmospheric oxygen (O2). Photosynthesis is the basis of all human food and oxygen needs.

The photosynthetic process can be divided into two sets of reactions that take place in different regions of plant chloroplasts: the light-dependent reaction and the light-independent or “dark” reactions. The light-dependent reaction takes place in the thylakoid membrane of the chloroplast. It converts light energy to chemical energy, stored as ATP and NADPH. This energy is then utilized in the stroma region of the chloroplast, to reduce atmospheric carbon dioxide into complex carbohydrates through the light-independent reactions of the Calvin-Benson cycle. The Calvin-Benson cycle represents the light-independent set of photosynthetic reactions. It uses the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) generated during the light-dependent reactions to convert atmospheric CO2 into complex carbohydrates. The Calvin-Benson cycle also regenerates adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and NADP+ for the light-dependent reaction. At the start of the Calvin-Benson cycle, atmospheric CO2 enters the leaf throug

 Core: Photosynthesis

Chemiosmosis

JoVE 10743

Oxidative phosphorylation is a highly efficient process that generates large amounts of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the basic unit of energy that drives many processes in living cells. Oxidative phosphorylation involves two processes—electron transport and chemiosmosis. During electron transport, electrons are shuttled between large complexes on the inner mitochondrial membrane and protons (H+) are pumped across the membrane into the intermembrane space, creating an electrochemical gradient. In the next step, protons flow back down their gradient into the mitochondrial matrix via ATP synthase, a protein complex embedded within the inner membrane. This process, called chemiosmosis, uses the energy of the proton gradient to drive the synthesis of ATP from adenosine diphosphate (ADP). The electron transport chain is a series of complexes that transfer electrons from electron donors to electron acceptors via simultaneous reduction and oxidation reactions, otherwise known as redox reactions. At the end of the chain, electrons reduce molecular oxygen to produce water. The shuttling of electrons between complexes is coupled with proton transfer, whereby protons (H+ ions) travel from the mitochondrial matrix to the intermembrane space against their concentration gradient. Eventually, the high concentration of protons in the interm

 Core: Cellular Respiration

A Method to Study the C924T Polymorphism of the Thromboxane A2 Receptor Gene

1SS Annunziata University Hospital, Unit of Clinical Molecular Biology and Predictive Medicine, University of Chieti, 2Department of Medical, Oral and Biotechnological Sciences, University of Chieti, 3Department of Biotechnological and Applied Clinical Sciences, University of L'Aquila, 4CNR - Institute of Molecular Genetics, Section of Chieti

JoVE 57289

 Genetics
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