Show Advanced Search

REFINE YOUR SEARCH:

Containing Text
- - -
+
Filter by author or institution
GO
Filter by publication date
From:
October, 2006
Until:
Today
Filter by journal section

Filter by science education

 
 
Adipose Tissue: Specialized connective tissue composed of fat cells (Adipocytes). It is the site of stored Fats, usually in the form of Triglycerides. In mammals, there are two types of adipose tissue, the White fat and the Brown fat. Their relative distributions vary in different species with most adipose tissue being white.

Preparing and Administering Subcutaneous Medications

JoVE 10234

Source: Madeline Lassche, MSNEd, RN and Katie Baraki, MSN, RN, College of Nursing, University of Utah, UT

Subcutaneous medication administration is a parenteral approach to administer small amounts of medication (less than 2 mL) into the layer of tissue just below the skin. Common medications administered via the subcutaneous route include anticoagulant medications, such as heparin or enoxaparin; epinephrine administered for allergic reactions; insulin; and some immunizations. Subcutaneous injection preparations are commonly provided in vials or ampules for withdrawal into a subcutaneous syringe. Subcutaneous needles have a shorter length and smaller diameter than syringes used for intramuscular injections, are typically less than 5/8th of an inch, and are 26 gauge or smaller. Medication absorption and onset is slower than for intravenous routes, with some absorption rates lasting 24 h or longer. This approach is selected for many medications that may be denatured or deactivated if given via the oral route, given the acidity of the gastrointestinal tract. Subcutaneous injection preparations are commonly provided in vials or ampules for withdrawal into a subcutaneous syringe. The nurse should determine the appropriate medication dose according to


 Nursing Skills

Preparing and Administering Intramuscular Injections

JoVE 10261

Source: Madeline Lassche, MSNEd, RN and Katie Baraki, MSN, RN, College of Nursing, University of Utah, UT

Intramuscular (IM) injections deposit medications deep into the muscle tissue. Since muscle fibers are well perfused, this route of administration provides quick uptake of the medication and allows for the administration of relatively large volumes. Skeletal muscles have fewer pain-sensing nerves than subcutaneous tissue, which allows for the less painful administration of irritating drugs (e.g., chlorpromazine, an anti-psychotic). IM injections are recommended for patients unable to take oral medications and for uncooperative patients. Some examples of medications that are commonly delivered by IM injections include antibiotics, hormones, and vaccinations. As in any other route of administration, the nurse must consider if the medication is appropriate, given the patient's medical conditions, allergies, and current clinical status. In addition, specifically for IM injections, it is important to assess the patient's muscle mass to determine the appropriate needle size. Also, if the patient has already received this injection, it is necessary to verify the injection site that was previously used and to ensure that the previous dose did not result in any adverse


 Nursing Skills

Whole Body and Regional Quantification of Active Human Brown Adipose Tissue Using 18F-FDG PET/CT

1Diabetes, Endocrinology, and Obesity Branch, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 2National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, 3Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School

Video Coming Soon

JoVE 58469


 JoVE In-Press

Manual Isolation of Adipose-derived Stem Cells from Human Lipoaspirates

1Cytori Therapeutics Inc, 2Division of Cardiac Surgery, Department of Surgery, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 3Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 4Department of Orthopedic Surgery, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 5Regenerative Bioengineering and Repair Laboratory, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA

JoVE 50585


 Biology

Human Brown Adipose Tissue Depots Automatically Segmented by Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography and Registered Magnetic Resonance Images

1Chemical and Physical Biology Program, Vanderbilt University, 2Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, 3Radiology & Radiological Sciences, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, 4Department of Pharmacology, Vanderbilt University

JoVE 52415


 Medicine

In Vivo and Ex Vivo Approaches to Study Ovarian Cancer Metastatic Colonization of Milky Spot Structures in Peritoneal Adipose

1Section of Urology, Department of Surgery, The University of Chicago, 2Department of Pathology, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, 3Campbell Family Institute for Breast Cancer Research, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, 4Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, Campbell Family Institute for Breast Cancer Research, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, University Health Network, 5Departments of Medicine, Pharmacology, and Cancer Biology, Duke University Medical Center

JoVE 52721


 Medicine

Fabrication of Extracellular Matrix-derived Foams and Microcarriers as Tissue-specific Cell Culture and Delivery Platforms

1Biomedical Engineering Graduate Program, The University of Western Ontario, 2Department of Anatomy & Cell Biology, Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry, The University of Western Ontario, 3Department of Chemical Engineering, Queen's University, 4Department of Chemical & Biochemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, The University of Western Ontario

JoVE 55436


 Bioengineering

In Vitro Recording of Mesenteric Afferent Nerve Activity in Mouse Jejunal and Colonic Segments

1Laboratory of Experimental Medicine and Pediatrics, Division of Gastroenterology, University of Antwerp, 2Visceral Pain Group, Discipline of Medicine, University of Adelaide, 3Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Sheffield, 4Department of Pharmacy, Pharmacology and Postgraduate Medicine, University of Hertfordshire, 5Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Antwerp University Hospital

JoVE 54576


 Neuroscience

Isolation, Fixation, and Immunofluorescence Imaging of Mouse Adrenal Glands

1Department of Internal Medicine (Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology, and Diabetes), University of Michigan Health System, 2Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University of Michigan Health System, 3Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology, University of Michigan Health System, 4Endocrine Oncology Program, University of Michigan Health System, 5Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Michigan Health System

JoVE 58530


 Immunology and Infection

Magnetic-Activated Cell Sorting Strategies to Isolate and Purify Synovial Fluid-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells from a Rabbit Model

1Postgraduate institution, Guangzhou Medical University, 2Guangdong Provincial Research Center for Artificial Intelligence and Digital Orthopedic Technology, 3Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Tissue Engineering, Shenzhen Laboratory of Digital Orthopaedic Engineering, Shenzhen Second People's Hospital (The First Hospital Affiliated to Shenzhen University), 4Department of Chemistry, Chinese University of Hong Kong, 5Shenzhen Kangning Hospital, Shenzhen Mental Health Center

JoVE 57466


 Biology

Biodegradable Magnesium Stent Treatment of Saccular Aneurysms in a Rat Model - Introduction of the Surgical Technique

1Department of Neurosurgery, Kantonsspital Aarau, 2Neuro Lab, Research Group for Experimental Neurosurgery and Neurocritical Care, Department of Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital and University of Bern, 3Division of Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Kantonsspital Aarau

JoVE 56359


 Neuroscience

Near-infrared Fluorescence Imaging of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

JoVE 10394

Source: Arvin H. Soepriatna1, Kelsey A. Bullens2, and Craig J. Goergen1

1 Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana

2 Department of Biochemistry, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana Near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging is an exciting optical technique that utilizes fluorescent probes to visualize complex biomolecular assemblies in tissues. NIRF imaging has many advantages over conventional imaging methods for noninvasive imaging of diseases. Unlike single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET), NIRF imaging is rapid, high-throughput, and does not involve ionizing radiation. Furthermore, recent developments in engineering target-specific and activatable fluorescent probes provide NIRF with high specificity and sensitivity, making it an attractive modality in studying cancer and cardiovascular disease. The presented procedure is designed to demonstrate the principles behind NIRF imaging and how to conduct in vivo and ex vivo experiments in small animals to study a variety of diseases. The specific example shown here employs an activatab


 Biomedical Engineering

Pelvic Exam I: Assessment of the External Genitalia

JoVE 10144

Source:
Alexandra Duncan, GTA, Praxis Clinical, New Haven, CT
Tiffany Cook, GTA, Praxis Clinical, New Haven, CT
Jaideep S. Talwalkar, MD, Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT

The pelvic exam can feel invasive to patients, so it is important to do everything possible to make patients feel comfortable and empowered, rather than vulnerable. Clinicians should be aware of how they are communicating, both verbally and nonverbally, and should give their patients control whenever possible. There are many ways to do this, from how the exam table is positioned to how the patient is engaged throughout the exam. As many as 1 in 5 patients may have experienced sexual trauma; therefore, it is important to avoid triggering those patients, but it's not always possible to know who they are. The exam in this video demonstrates neutral language and techniques that can be employed with all patients to create the best experience possible. It's important to keep the patient covered wherever possible and to minimize extraneous contact. A clinician should be careful to tuck fingers that aren't being used to examine the patient to avoid accidental contact with the clitoris or anus. Before performing the pelvic e


 Physical Examinations II

Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Culture on Polyvinyl Alcohol-Co-Itaconic Acid Hydrogels with Varying Stiffness Under Xeno-Free Conditions

1Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, National Central University, 2Department of Botany and Microbiology, King Saud University, 3Cathay Medical Research Institute, Cathay General Hospital, 4Graduate Institute of Systems Biology and Bioinformatics, National Central University, 5Department of Medical Microbiology and Parasitology, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 6Department of Internal Medicine, Taiwan Landseed Hospital, 7Department of Zoology, Bharathiar University, 8Thiruvalluvar University

JoVE 57314


 Bioengineering

Hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic Clamps in Conscious, Unrestrained Mice

1Diabetes and Obesity Research Center, Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute at Lake Nona, 2Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, 3Vanderbilt Mouse Metabolic Phenotyping Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, 4Department of Pediatrics and Cellular and Integrative Physiology, Indiana University School of Medicine

JoVE 3188


 Medicine

Synthesis of Thermogelling Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-graft-chondroitin Sulfate Composites with Alginate Microparticles for Tissue Engineering

1Department of Chemical Engineering, Rowan University, 2Department of Biological Sciences, Rowan University, 3Department of Biomedical Engineering, Drexel University

JoVE 53704


 Bioengineering

Isolation and Characterization of Human Umbilical Cord-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Preterm and Term Infants

1Department of Pediatrics, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 2Department of Pathology, Kobe Children's Hospital, 3Department of Pediatrics, Hyogo College of Medicine, 4Department of Developmental Pediatrics, Shizuoka Children's Hospital, 5Department of Pediatrics, Nihon University School of Medicine

Video Coming Soon

JoVE 58806


 JoVE In-Press

Measurements of Motor Function and Other Clinical Outcome Parameters in Ambulant Children with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

1Division of Pediatric Neurology, University Children's Hospital Basel (UKBB), University of Basel, 2Department of Neurology, University of Basel Hospital, 3Division of Neurology, Medical University Clinic, Kantonsspital Baselland, 4Division of Pediatric Neurology, CHUV, 5Division of Neuropaediatrics, Inselspital, University Children's Hospital Bern, 6Department of Radiology, Division of Radiological Physics, University of Basel Hospital, 7Hospices Civils de Lyon, Hôpital Femme-Mère-Enfant, L'Escale, Service de Médecine Physique et de Réadaptation Pédiatrique

Video Coming Soon

JoVE 58784


 JoVE In-Press

Visualization of 3D White Adipose Tissue Structure Using Whole-Mount Staining

1Translational Medicine Program, The Hospital for Sick Children, 2Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, University of Toronto, 3Neurosciences & Mental Health Program, The Hospital for Sick Children, 4Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Smart-Aging Convergence Research Center, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, 5Banting and Best Diabetes Centre, University of Toronto

Video Coming Soon

JoVE 58683


 JoVE In-Press

Estimation of Nephron Number in Whole Kidney Using the Acid Maceration Method

1Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, The University of Mississippi Medical Center, 2Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology, Rush University Medical Center, 3Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology, The University of Mississippi Medical Center, 4Department of Neurology, The University of Mississippi Medical Center

Video Coming Soon

JoVE 58599


 JoVE In-Press

A Hyperandrogenic Mouse Model to Study Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

1Department of Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 2Department of Health, Beijing Military General Hospital, 3Southern Medical University, 4Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 5Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

JoVE 58379


 Developmental Biology

Rigid Embedding of Fixed and Stained, Whole, Millimeter-Scale Specimens for Section-free 3D Histology by Micro-Computed Tomography

1The Jake Gittlen Laboratories for Cancer Research, Penn State College of Medicine, 2Division of Experimental Pathology, Department of Pathology, Penn State College of Medicine, 3Medical Scientist Training Program, Penn State College of Medicine, 4Center for In Vivo Microscopy, Duke University Medical Center, 5KTM Research

JoVE 58293


 Bioengineering

123457
More Results...