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Adrenal Cortex: The outer layer of the adrenal gland. It is derived from Mesoderm and comprised of three zones (outer Zona glomerulosa, middle Zona fasciculata, and inner Zona reticularis) with each producing various steroids preferentially, such as Aldosterone; Hydrocortisone; Dehydroepiandrosterone; and Androstenedione. Adrenal cortex function is regulated by pituitary Adrenocorticotropin.

Isolation, Fixation, and Immunofluorescence Imaging of Mouse Adrenal Glands

1Department of Internal Medicine (Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology, and Diabetes), University of Michigan Health System, 2Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University of Michigan Health System, 3Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology, University of Michigan Health System, 4Endocrine Oncology Program, University of Michigan Health System, 5Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Michigan Health System

JoVE 58530

 Immunology and Infection

Hypothalamic-Pituitary Axis

JoVE 10879

The response to stress—be it physical or psychological, acute or chronic—involves activation of the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal (HPA) axis. The HPA axis is part of the neuroendocrine system because it involves both neuronal and hormonal communication. Its function is to regulate homeostatic systems—metabolic, cardiovascular, and immune—providing the necessary means to respond to a stressor. In response to stress, the neurons in the hypothalamus release corticotropin-releasing hormone, or CRH, into the bloodstream. CRH takes a short journey to the pituitary gland where it stimulates the release of adrenocorticotropic hormone, or ACTH. The site of action for ACTH are the adrenal glands which lay just on the surface of the kidneys. When stimulated, the adrenal glands release two types of stress messages. Neural stimulation initiates the first message—the release of epinephrine and norepinephrine from the adrenal medulla. This activates the sympathetic nervous system resulting in elevated heart rate, blood flow, and respiration—processes designed to activate states of alertness and arousal. These two chemicals are also referred to as adrenaline and noradrenaline, respectively. ACTH initiates the second message—the release of glucocorticoids by the adrenal cortex. In humans, cortisol is the primary hormone

 Core: Endocrine System

Hormonal Regulation

JoVE 10893

The renin-aldosterone system is an endocrine system which guides the renal absorption of water and electrolytes, thus managing blood pressure and osmoregulation. Activation of the system begins in the kidneys with a small cluster of cells adjacent to the afferent and efferent blood vessels of the renal corpuscle. As the nephrons are filtering blood, juxtaglomerular cells monitor blood pressure. If they detect a decrease in pressure, they release the hormone renin into the bloodstream. Circulating renin interacts with angiotensinogen, a precursor protein synthesized by the liver, to create angiotensin I. A final step cleaves angiotensin I into angiotensin II, a process achieved by angiotensin-converting enzyme, or ACE, which is released by the lungs. Angiotensin II temporarily increases blood pressure by contracting smaller blood vessels. It also induces the release of aldosterone from the adrenal cortex of the kidneys. Aldosterone directly stimulates the reabsorption of sodium and the excretion of potassium by the kidneys to maintain electrolyte balance. Moreover, circulating levels of aldosterone stimulate the release of antidiuretic hormone, or ADH, by the hypothalamus in the brain. Upon reaching the kidneys, ADH upregulates aquaporin channels in the nephrons which increase the water retention in the blood vessels. The combined effects of

 Core: Regulation and Excretion

A Novel Method: Super-selective Adrenal Venous Sampling

1Department of Radiology, Nerima Hikarigaoka Hospital, 2Department of Uro-Oncology, Saitama Medical University International Medical Center, 3Endocrinology & Diabetes Center, Yokohama Rosai Hospital, 4Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Kanazawa University Graduate School of Medicine, 5Department of Medical Education, School of Medicine, California University of Science and Medicine, 6Department of Pathology, Saitama Medical University International Medical Center, 7Department of Radiology, Yokohama Rosai Hospital

JoVE 55716

 Medicine

Mouse Adrenal Chromaffin Cell Isolation

1Department of Physiology and Biophysics, University of California, Irvine (UCI), 2Department of Physiology and Biophysics, University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine, 3Zilkha Neurogenetic Institute, University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine, 4Department of Developmental and Cell Biology, University of California, Irvine (UCI)

JoVE 129

 Biology
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