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Anatomy: A branch of biology dealing with the structure of organisms.

Discovering Middle Ear Anatomy by Transcanal Endoscopic Ear Surgery: A Dissection Manual

1Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, University of Bern, 2Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery, University Hospital of Modena, 3Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery, University Hospital of Verona, 4Artificial Hearing Research, Artorg Center for Biomedical Engineering, University of Bern

Video Coming Soon

JoVE 56390


 JoVE In-Press

Combined In vivo Optical and µCT Imaging to Monitor Infection, Inflammation, and Bone Anatomy in an Orthopaedic Implant Infection in Mice

1Orthopaedic Hospital Research Center, Orthopaedic Hospital Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), 2PerkinElmer, 3Department of Dermatology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 4Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

JoVE 51612


 Medicine

Fiber Connections of the Supplementary Motor Area Revisited: Methodology of Fiber Dissection, DTI, and Three Dimensional Documentation

1Department of Neurosurgery, University of Minnesota, 2Department of Neurosurgery, Barrow Neurological Institute, St. Josephs Hospital and Medical Center, 3Department of Radiology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 4Department of Radiology, University of Minnesota, 5Department of Neurosurgery, Tepecik Training and Research Hospital, 6Department of Neurosurgery, Cerrahpasa Medical School, University of Istanbul

JoVE 55681


 Neuroscience

A Model of Free Tissue Transfer: The Rat Epigastric Free Flap

1Anatomy Department, NOVA Medical School, Universidade NOVA de Lisboa, 2Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Department and Burn Unit, Centro Hospitalar de Lisboa Central - Hospital de São José, 3UCIBIO, Life Sciences Department, Faculty of Sciences and Technology, Universidade NOVA de Lisboa, 4CEDOC, NOVA Medical School, Universidade NOVA de Lisboa, 5Physics Department, Faculty of Sciences and Technology, LIBPhys, 6Pathology Department, Centro Hospitalar de Lisboa Central – Hospital de São José

JoVE 55281


 Medicine

Scaled Anatomical Model Creation of Biomedical Tomographic Imaging Data and Associated Labels for Subsequent Sub-surface Laser Engraving (SSLE) of Glass Crystals

1Department of Biological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, 2Models Plus Incorporated, 3Saint Joseph Regional Medical Center, 4Harper Cancer Research Institute, University of Notre Dame, 5Notre Dame Integrated Imaging Facility, University of Notre Dame

JoVE 55340


 Bioengineering

Lesion Explorer: A Video-guided, Standardized Protocol for Accurate and Reliable MRI-derived Volumetrics in Alzheimer's Disease and Normal Elderly

1LC Campbell Cognitive Neurology Research Unit, Heart & Stroke Foundation Canadian Partnership for Stroke Recovery, Brain Sciences Research Program, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, 2Department of Medicine (Neurology), Institute of Medical Science, University of Toronto

JoVE 50887


 Medicine

High-resolution In Vivo Manual Segmentation Protocol for Human Hippocampal Subfields Using 3T Magnetic Resonance Imaging

1Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto, 2Computational Brain Anatomy Laboratory, Douglas Institute, McGill University, 3McGill Centre for Studies in Aging, McGill University, 4MRI Unit, Research Imaging Centre, Campbell Family Mental Health Research Institute, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, 5Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, 6School of Psychology, University of Wollongong, 7Neuroscience Research Australia, 8Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, 9Kimel Family Translational Imaging Genetics Research Laboratory, Research Imaging Centre, Campbell Family Mental Health Research Institute, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health

JoVE 51861


 Neuroscience

Whole-brain Segmentation and Change-point Analysis of Anatomical Brain MRI—Application in Premanifest Huntington's Disease

1The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 2Center for Imaging Science, Johns Hopkins University, 3Institute for Computational Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, 4Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics, Johns Hopkins University, 5Division of Neurobiology, Departments of Psychiatry, Neurology, Neuroscience and Pharmacology, and Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 6F.M. Kirby Research Center for Functional Brain Imaging, Kennedy Krieger Institute, 7Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University

Video Coming Soon

JoVE 57256


 JoVE In-Press

Pelvic Exam III: Bimanual and Rectovaginal Exam

JoVE 10163

Source:

Alexandra Duncan, GTA, Praxis Clinical, New Haven, CT

Tiffany Cook, GTA, Praxis Clinical, New Haven, CT

Jaideep S. Talwalkar, MD, Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT

A bimanual exam is a thorough check of a patient's cervix, uterus, and ovaries. It can tell an experienced provider a great deal, as it may lead to the discovery of abnormalities, such as cysts, fibroids, or malignancies. However, it's useful even in the absence of such findings, as it allows the practitioner to establish an understanding of the patient's anatomy for future reference. Performing the bimanual exam before the speculum exam can help relax patients, mentally and physically, before what is often perceived as the "most invasive" part of the exam. A practitioner already familiar with the patient's anatomy can insert a speculum more smoothly and comfortably. However, lubrication used during the bimanual exam may interfere with processing certain samples obtained during the speculum exam. Providers must be familiar with local laboratory processing requirements before committing to a specific order of examination. This demonstration begins


 Physical Examinations II

Use of a Piglet Model for the Study of Anesthetic-induced Developmental Neurotoxicity (AIDN): A Translational Neuroscience Approach

1Department of Anesthesiology, Ohio State University College of Medicine, 2Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Nationwide Children's Hospital, 3Department of Anaesthesia and Critical Care Medicine, University of Toronto, 4Department of Biomedical Sciences, Section of Anatomic Pathology, Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine, 5Department of Pathology and Anatomy, Ohio State University College of Medicine, 6Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Nationwide Children's Hospital

JoVE 55193


 Medicine

Coordinate Mapping of Hyolaryngeal Mechanics in Swallowing

1Medical College of Georgia, Georgia Regents University, 2Department of Communicative Sciences and Disorders, New York University, 3Department of Cellular Biology & Anatomy, Georgia Regents University, 4Department of Otolaryngology, Georgia Regents University

JoVE 51476


 Medicine

Male Rectal Exam

JoVE 10102

Source: Joseph Donroe, MD, Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT

While its usefulness in cancer screening is debated, the male rectal examination remains an important part of the physical exam. The exam is indicated in selected patients with lower urinary tract symptoms, urinary and/or fecal incontinence or retention, back pain, anorectal symptoms, abdominal complaints, trauma patients, unexplained anemia, weight loss, or bone pain. There are no absolute contraindications to the rectal exam; however, relative contraindications include patient unwillingness to undergo the exam, severe rectal pain, recent anorectal surgery or trauma, and neutropenia. When performing the rectal exam, the examiner should conceptualize the relevant anatomy. The external anal sphincter is the most distal part of the anal canal, which extends three to four centimeters before transitioning into the rectum. The prostate gland lies anterior to the rectum, just beyond the anal canal. The posterior surface of the prostate, including its apex, base, lateral lobes, and median sulcus, can be palpated through the rectal wall (Figure 1). The normal consistency of the prostate is similar to the thenar eminence when the hand is in a tight fist. The thumb knuckle is representativ


 Physical Examinations II

Comprehensive Breast Exam

JoVE 10118

Source:
Alexandra Duncan, GTA, Praxis Clinical, New Haven, CT
Tiffany Cook, GTA, Praxis Clinical, New Haven, CT
Jaideep S. Talwalkar, MD, Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT

Breast exams are a key part of an annual gynecological exam and are important for all patients, no matter their sex or gender expression. One out of every 8 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer; male breast cancer, though less common, has a lifetime incidence of 1 in 1000. Breast exams can feel invasive to patients, so it is important to do everything possible to make the patients feel comfortable and empowered, rather than vulnerable. Examiners should be aware of what they are communicating, both verbally and non-verbally, and give their patients control wherever possible (for instance, always allowing them to remove their own gowns). Examiners may choose to utilize chaperones for the patients' (as well as their own) comfort. Some institutions require the use of chaperones. While it is always important to avoid overly clinical language, certain colloquial words can cross the line from caring to overly intimate in this exam. It is helpful to avoid the words "touch" and "feel" in this exam, as this lan


 Physical Examinations II

Elbow Exam

JoVE 10207

Source: Robert E. Sallis, MD. Kaiser Permanente, Fontana, California, USA

The elbow is a hinged joint that involves the articulation of 3 bones: the humerus, radius, and ulna. It is a much more stable joint than the shoulder, and because of that, the elbow has less range of motion. The elbow and its structures are prone to significant injuries, particularly with repetitive motion. Lateral and medial epicondylitis (also called tennis elbow and golfer's elbow) are two common diagnoses and often occur as a result of occupational activities. When examining the elbow, it is important to remove enough clothing so that the entire shoulder and elbow can be inspected. It is important to compare the injured elbow to the uninvolved side. A systematic evaluation of the elbow includes inspection, palpation, range of motion (ROM) testing, and special tests, including maneuvers to evaluate ligamentous stability and stretch tests to accentuate pain caused by epicondylitis.


 Physical Examinations III

Measuring Grey Matter Differences with Voxel-based Morphometry: The Musical Brain

JoVE 10299

Source: Laboratories of Jonas T. Kaplan and Sarah I. Gimbel—University of Southern California

Experience shapes the brain. It is well understood that our brains are different as a result of learning. While many experience-related changes manifest themselves at the microscopic level, for example by neurochemical adjustments in the behavior of individual neurons, we may also examine anatomical changes to the structure of the brain at a macroscopic level. One famous example of this kind of change comes from the case of the London taxi drivers, who along with learning the complex routes of the city show larger volume in the hippocampus, a brain structure known to play a role in navigational memory.1 Many traditional methods of examining brain anatomy require painstaking tracing of anatomical regions of interest in order to measure their size. However, using modern neuroimaging techniques, we can now compare the anatomy of the brains across groups of people using automated algorithms. While these techniques do not avail themselves of the sophisticated knowledge that human neuroanatomists may bring to the task, they are quick, and sensitive to very small differences in anatomy. In a structural magnetic resonance image of the brain, the intensity of each volumetric pixel, or voxel, relat


 Neuropsychology

Nose, Sinuses, Oral Cavity and Pharynx Exam

JoVE 10152

Source: Richard Glickman-Simon, MD, Assistant Professor, Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine, MA

This video provides an overview of sinus, nose, and throat examinations. The demonstration begins with a brief overview of the anatomy of the region. The upper third of the nose is bony, and the bottom two-thirds are cartilaginous. Air entering the nares passes through the nasal vestibules and into the narrow passageway between the nasal septum medially and the bony turbinates laterally. Beneath each curving turbinate is a groove or meatus. The nasolacrimal duct and most of the air-filled paranasal sinuses drain into the inferior and middle meatuses, respectively. Of the three sets of paranasal sinuses, only the maxillary and frontal can be readily examined. A continuous, highly vascular mucosa lines the entire nasal cavity and sinuses. Figure 1. Anatomy of the Nose. Figure 2. Location of the Major Sinuses. Muscular folds of the lips mark the entrance


 Physical Examinations II

Lateral Canthotomy and Inferior Cantholysis

JoVE 10266

Source: James W Bonz, MD, Emergency Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, USA

Lateral canthotomy is a potentially eyesight-saving procedure when performed emergently for an orbital compartment syndrome. An orbital compartment syndrome results from a buildup of pressure behind the eye; as pressure mounts, both the optic nerve and its vascular supply are compressed, rapidly leading to nerve damage and blindness if the pressure is not quickly relieved. The medial and lateral canthal tendons hold the eyelids firmly in place forming an anatomical compartment with limited space for the globe. In an orbital compartment syndrome, pressure rapidly increases as the globe is forced against the eyelids. Lateral canthotomy is the procedure by which the lateral canthal tendon is severed, thereby releasing the globe from its fixed position. Often, severing of the lateral canthal tendon alone is not enough to release the globe and the inferior portion (inferior crus) of the lateral canthal tendon also needs to be severed (inferior cantholysis). This increases precious space behind the eye by allowing the globe to become more proptotic, resulting in decompression. Most frequently, orbital compartment syndrome is the result of acute facial trauma, with the subsequent development of a retrobulbar


 Emergency Medicine and Critical Care

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