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Aortic Aneurysm: An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of Aorta.

A New Murine Model of Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair

1INSERM U698 Cardiovascular Remodelling, Hôpital X. Bichat, AP-HP, Paris, 2Bio-Ingénierie des Polymères Cardiovasculaires (BPC), Institut Galilée - Université Paris 13, Paris, France, 3Service de Chirurgie Vasculaire, Hôpital Henri Mondor, AP-HP, Université Paris-Est Creteil, 4Ecole de chirurgie de l'assistance publique des hôpitaux de Paris, 5Service de Chirurgie Cardiaque et Vasculaire, Hôpital Européen Georges Pompidou, AP-HP, Université René Descartes

JoVE 50740


 Medicine

Creation of a Rodent Model of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm by Blocking Adventitial Vasa Vasorum Perfusion

1Department of Medical Physiology, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 2Division of Vascular Surgery, Second Department of Surgery, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 3Department of Applied Biological Chemistry, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kindai University, 4Department of Organ & Tissue Anatomy, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine

JoVE 55763


 Medicine

Quantitative Micro-CT Analysis of Aortopathy in a Mouse Model of β-aminopropionitrile-induced Aortic Aneurysm and Dissection

1Center for Vascular and Inflammatory Diseases, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 2Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 3Division of Vascular Surgery, University of Maryland School of Medicine

JoVE 57589


 Medicine

Quantitative Strain Mapping of an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

JoVE 10480

Authors: Hannah L. Cebull1, Arvin H. Soepriatna1, John J. Boyle2 and Craig J. Goergen1 1Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 2Mechanical Engineering & Materials Science, Washington University in St. Louis, St Louis, Missouri

The mechanical behavior of soft tissues, such as blood vessels, skin, tendons, and other organs, are strongly influenced by their composition of elastin and collagen, which provide elasticity and strength. The fiber orientation of these proteins depends on the type of soft tissue and can range from a single preferred direction to intricate meshed networks, which can become altered in diseased tissue. Therefore, soft tissues often behave anisotropically on the cellular and organ level, creating a need for three-dimensional characterization. Developing a method for reliably estimating strain fields within complex biological tissues or structures is important to mechanically characterize and understande disease. Strain represents how soft tissue relatively deforms over time, and it can be described mathematically through various estimations. Acquiring image data over time allows deformation and strain to be estimated. However, all medica


 Biomedical Engineering

Standardized Technique of Aortic Valve Re-implantation for Valve-sparing Aortic Root Replacement

1Department of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, Pitie Salpetriere University Hospital, Assistance Publique, Hopitaux de Paris (APHP), Institut de Cardiologie, 2Institute of Veterinary Physiology and Zurich Center for Integrative Human Physiology, University of Zurich, 3Herzzentrum Hirslanden, Klinik St Anna

JoVE 56790


 Medicine

Biodegradable Magnesium Stent Treatment of Saccular Aneurysms in a Rat Model - Introduction of the Surgical Technique

1Department of Neurosurgery, Kantonsspital Aarau, 2Neuro Lab, Research Group for Experimental Neurosurgery and Neurocritical Care, Department of Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital and University of Bern, 3Division of Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Kantonsspital Aarau

JoVE 56359


 Neuroscience

Technique and Patient Selection Criteria of Right Anterior Mini-Thoracotomy for Minimal Access Aortic Valve Replacement

1Department of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, Pitié Salpêtrière University Hospital, Assistance Publique, Hôpitaux de Paris (APHP), Institut de Cardiologie, 2Institute of Veterinary Physiology and Zurich Center for Integrative Human Physiology, University of Zurich, 3Herzzentrum Hirslanden, Klinik St Anna, 4Department of Radiology, Canton Hospital Lucerne, 5Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Unit, Pitié Salpêtrière University Hospital, Assistance Publique, Hôpitaux de Paris (APHP), Institut de Cardiologie

JoVE 57323


 Medicine

Analysis of Spinal Cord Blood Supply Combining Vascular Corrosion Casting and Fluorescence Microsphere Technique: A Feasibility Study in an Aortic Surgical Large Animal Model

1Cardiovascular Surgery, Heart Center Freiburg University, Faculty of Medicine, University of Freiburg, 2Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, University Medical Center Freiburg, Faculty of Medicine, University of Freiburg

Video Coming Soon

JoVE 56222


 JoVE In-Press

Using In Vivo and Tissue and Cell Explant Approaches to Study the Morphogenesis and Pathogenesis of the Embryonic and Perinatal Aorta

1Yale Cardiovascular Research Center, Section of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, 2Department of Neurology, Yale University School of Medicine, 3Department of Neurology, Xinhua Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine

JoVE 56039


 Developmental Biology

A Novel Stretching Platform for Applications in Cell and Tissue Mechanobiology

1Centre for Interdisciplinary NanoPhysics, Department of Physics, University of Ottawa, 2University of Ottawa Heart Institue, University of Ottawa, 3Libin Cardiovascular Institute of Alberta, University of Calgary, 4Department of Biology, University of Ottawa, 5Institute for Science, Society and Policy, University of Ottawa

JoVE 51454


 Bioengineering

Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging

JoVE 10393

Source: Frederick W. Damen and Craig J. Goergen, Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana

In this video, high field, small-bore magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with physiological monitoring is demonstrated to acquire gated cine loops of the murine cardiovascular system. This procedure provides a basis for assessing left-ventricular function, visualizing vascular networks, and quantifying motion of organs due to respiration. Comparable small animal cardiovascular imaging modalities include high-frequency ultrasound and micro-computed tomography (CT); however, each modality is associated with trade-offs that should be considered. While ultrasound does provide high spatial and temporal resolution, imaging artifacts are common. For example, dense tissue (i.e., the sternum and ribs) can limit imaging penetration depth, and hyperechoic signal at the interface between gas and liquid (i.e., pleura surrounding the lungs) can blur contrast in nearby tissue. Micro-CT in contrast does not suffer from as many in-plane artifacts, but does have lower temporal resolution and limited soft-tissue contrast. Furthermore, micro-CT uses X-ray radiation and often requires the use of contrast agents to visualize vasculature, both of which are known to cause side effects at high doses incl


 Biomedical Engineering

High-frequency Ultrasound Imaging of the Abdominal Aorta

JoVE 10397

Authors: Amelia R. Adelsperger, Evan H. Phillips, and Craig J. Goergen, Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana

High-frequency ultrasound systems are used to acquire high resolution images. Here, the use of a state-of-the-art system will be demonstrated to image the morphology and hemodynamics of small pulsatile arteries and veins found in mice and rats. Ultrasound is a relatively inexpensive, portable, and versatile method for the noninvasive assessment of vessels in humans as well as large and small animals. These are several key advantages that ultraound offers compared to other techniques, such as computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and near-infrared fluorescence tomography (NIRF). CT requires ionizing radiation and MRI can be prohibitively expensive and even impractical in some scenarios. NIRF, on the other hand, is limited by the penetration depth of light required to excite the fluorescent contrast agents. Ultrasound has limitations in terms of imaging depth; however, this may be overcome by sacrificing resolution and using a lower frequency transducer. Abdominal gas and excess body weight can severely diminish image quality. In the first case, the propagation of sound waves is limited, while in the lat


 Biomedical Engineering

Near-infrared Fluorescence Imaging of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

JoVE 10394

Source: Arvin H. Soepriatna1, Kelsey A. Bullens2, and Craig J. Goergen1

1 Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana

2 Department of Biochemistry, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana Near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging is an exciting optical technique that utilizes fluorescent probes to visualize complex biomolecular assemblies in tissues. NIRF imaging has many advantages over conventional imaging methods for noninvasive imaging of diseases. Unlike single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET), NIRF imaging is rapid, high-throughput, and does not involve ionizing radiation. Furthermore, recent developments in engineering target-specific and activatable fluorescent probes provide NIRF with high specificity and sensitivity, making it an attractive modality in studying cancer and cardiovascular disease. The presented procedure is designed to demonstrate the principles behind NIRF imaging and how to conduct in vivo and ex vivo experiments in small animals to study a variety of diseases. The specific example shown here employs an activatab


 Biomedical Engineering

Fabrication of Small Caliber Stent-grafts Using Electrospinning and Balloon Expandable Bare Metal Stents

1Division of Engineering, Mayo Clinic, 2Department of Cardiovascular Diseases, Mayo Clinic, 3Department of Cardioangiology, ICRC, St. Anne's University Hospital, 4Department of Vascular Surgery, Mayo Clinic, 5Department of Physiology and Biomedical Engineering, Mayo Clinic

JoVE 54731


 Medicine

Meso-Scale Particle Image Velocimetry Studies of Neurovascular Flows In Vitro

1Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Riverside, 2Division of Interventional Neuroradiology, University of California, Los Angeles, 3Materials Science and Engineering Program, University of California, Riverside, 4Department of Bioengineering, University of California, Riverside

Video Coming Soon

JoVE 58902


 JoVE In-Press

Generation of Cationic Nanoliposomes for the Efficient Delivery of In Vitro Transcribed Messenger RNA

1Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Clinical Research Laboratory, University Medical Center, 2Atherothrombosis and Vascular Biology, Baker Heart & Diabetes Institute, 3Department of Medicine, Monash University

Video Coming Soon

JoVE 58444


 JoVE In-Press

Abdominal Exam I: Inspection and Auscultation

JoVE 10088

Source: Alexander Goldfarb, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, MA

Gastrointestinal disease accounts for millions of office visits and hospital admissions annually. Physical examination of the abdomen is a crucial tool in diagnosing diseases of the gastrointestinal tract; in addition, it can help identify pathological processes in cardiovascular, urinary, and other systems. As physical examination in general, the examination of the abdominal region is important for establishing physician-patient contact, for reaching the preliminary diagnosis and selecting subsequent laboratory and imaging tests, and determining the urgency of care. As with the other parts of a physical examination, visual inspection and auscultation of the abdomen are done in a systematic fashion so that no potential findings are missed. Special attention should be paid to potential problems already identified by the patient's history. Here we assume that the patient has already been identified, and has had history taken, symptoms discussed, and areas of potential concern identified. In this video we will not review the patient's history; instead, we will go directly to the physical examination. Before we get to the examination, let's briefly review s


 Physical Examinations II

Abdominal Exam III: Palpation

JoVE 10089

Source: Alexander Goldfarb, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, MA

Abdominal palpation, if performed correctly, allows for examination of the large and relatively superficial organs; for a skilled examiner, it allows for assessment of the smaller and deeper structures as well. The amount of information that can be obtained by palpation of the abdominal area also depends on the anatomical characteristics of the patient. For example, obesity might make palpation of internal organs difficult and require that additional maneuvers be performed. Abdominal palpation provides valuable information regarding localization of the problem and its severity, as abdominal palpation identifies the areas of tenderness as well as presence of organomegaly and tumors. The specific focus of palpation is driven by the information collected during history taking and other elements of the abdominal exam. Palpation helps to integrate this information and develop the strategy for subsequent diagnostic steps.


 Physical Examinations II

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