Show Advanced Search

REFINE YOUR SEARCH:

Containing Text
- - -
+
Filter by author or institution
GO
Filter by publication date
From:
October, 2006
Until:
Today
Filter by section

 
 
Autonomic Nervous System: The enteric, parasympathetic, and sympathetic nervous systems taken together. Generally speaking, the autonomic nervous system regulates the internal environment during both peaceful activity and physical or emotional stress. Autonomic activity is controlled and integrated by the central nervous system, especially the hypothalamus and the solitary nucleus, which receive information relayed from Visceral afferents; these and related central and sensory structures are sometimes (but not here) considered to be part of the autonomic nervous system itself.

Measuring Cardiac Autonomic Nervous System (ANS) Activity in Children

1Department of Public Health, Academic Medical Center - University of Amsterdam, 2Department of Epidemiology, Documentation and Health Promotion, Public Health Service of Amsterdam (GGD), 3Department of Biological Psychology, VU University, 4EMGO+ Institute, VU University Medical Center, 5Institute of Health Sciences, VU University, 6Department of Pediatrics, VU University Medical Center

JoVE 50073


 Medicine

A Modified Trier Social Stress Test for Vulnerable Mexican American Adolescents

1Center for Environmental Research and Children's Health (CERCH), Berkley School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, 2San Francisco (UCSF) School of Nursing, University of California, San Francisco, 3Human Development and Family Studies, Iowa State University

JoVE 55393


 Developmental Biology

Physiological Correlates of Emotion Recognition

JoVE 10297

Source: Laboratories of Jonas T. Kaplan and Sarah I. Gimbel—University of Southern California

The autonomic nervous system (ANS) controls the activity of the body's internal organs and regulates changes in their activity depending on the current environment. The vagus nerve, which innervates many of the internal organs, is an important part of the system. When our brain senses danger, vagal tone is inhibited, leading to a set of changes in the body designed to make us more prepared to fight or flee; for example, our heart rate increases, our pupils dilate, and we breath more quickly. Conversely, when the vagal system is activated, these physiological responses are inhibited, leading to a calmer state. The vagus nerve, then, acts as a kind of "brake" on our arousal. One interesting consequence of this calmer state is that it tends to promote social interaction-when we are not tensed and afraid of our immediate environment we are instead receptive to interacting with others. Poor functioning of this regulatory mechanism, therefore, may be associated with difficulties in social behavior. One index of autonomic regulation is heart rate variability (HRV). HRV is a measure of how much the gap between one beat and the next varies over time. High HRV means there are continual fluctuations in the


 Neuropsychology

Dual Labeling of Neural Crest Cells and Blood Vessels Within Chicken Embryos Using ChickGFP Neural Tube Grafting and Carbocyanine Dye DiI Injection

1Birth Defects Research Centre, UCL Institute of Child Health, 2Blizard Institute, Centre for Digestive Diseases, Queen Mary University of London, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, 3Department of Clinical Genetics, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam

JoVE 52514


 Developmental Biology

Using Fiberless, Wearable fNIRS to Monitor Brain Activity in Real-world Cognitive Tasks

1Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Malet Place Engineering Building, University College London, 2Infrared Imaging Lab, Institute for Advanced Biomedical Technology (ITAB), Department of Neuroscience, Imaging and Clinical Sciences, University of Chieti-Pescara, 3Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, Alexandra House, University College London

JoVE 53336


 Behavior

3D-Neuronavigation In Vivo Through a Patient's Brain During a Spontaneous Migraine Headache

1Headache & Orofacial Pain Effort (H.O.P.E.), Biological & Materials Sciences Department, University of Michigan School of Dentistry, 2Michigan Center for Oral Health Research (MCOHR), University of Michigan School of Dentistry, 3Translational Neuroimaging Laboratory, Molecular & Behavioral Neuroscience Institute, University of Michigan, 4PET Physics Section, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Radiology Department, University of Michigan, 53DLab, University of Michigan, 6Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Michigan

JoVE 50682


 Medicine

Stereotaxic Injection of a Viral Vector for Conditional Gene Manipulation in the Mouse Spinal Cord

1Département Nociception et Douleur, Institut des Neurosciences Cellulaires et Intégratives, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 2Departments of Anesthesiology and Pharmacology, Columbia University, 3Department of Anesthesiology, Niigata University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences

JoVE 50313


 Neuroscience

Using a Whole-mount Immunohistochemical Method to Study the Innervation of the Biliary Tract in Suncus murinus

1Department of Frontier Health Sciences, Graduate School of Human Health Sciences, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 2Department of Anatomy, Tokyo Medical University, 3Area of Regulatory Biology, Division of Life Science, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University

JoVE 55483


 Biology

Efficient Gene Delivery into Multiple CNS Territories Using In Utero Electroporation

1Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Hotchkiss Brain Institute, Alberta Children’s Hospital Research Institute, University of Calgary, 2Department of Medical Genetics, Alberta Children’s Hospital Research Institute, Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary

JoVE 2957


 Neuroscience

123456789114
More Results...