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Bacterial Infections: Infections by bacteria, general or unspecified.

Bacterial Signaling

JoVE 10713

At times, a group of bacteria behaves like a community. To achieve this, they engage in quorum sensing, the perception of higher cell density that results in a shift in gene expression. Quorum sensing involves both extracellular and intracellular signaling. The signaling cascade starts with a molecule called an autoinducer (AI). Individual bacteria produce AIs that move out of the bacterial cell membrane into the extracellular space. AIs can move passively along a concentration gradient out of the cell, or be actively transported across the bacterial membrane. When cell density in the bacterial populations is low, the AIs diffuse away from the bacteria, keeping the environmental concentration of AIs low. As bacteria reproduce and continue to excrete AIs, the concentration of AIs increases, eventually reaching a threshold concentration. This threshold permits AIs to bind membrane receptors on the bacteria, triggering changes in gene expression across the whole bacterial community. Many bacteria are broadly classified as gram positive or gram negative. These terms refer to the color that the bacteria take on when treated with a series of staining solutions which were developed by Hans Christian Joachim Gram over a century ago. If bacteria pick up a purple color, they are gram-positive; if they look red, they are gram-negative. These stain colors are pic

 Core: Cell Signaling

Antibiotic Selection

JoVE 10807

Researchers use antibiotic resistance genes to identify bacteria that possess a plasmid containing their gene of interest. Antibiotic resistance naturally occurs when a spontaneous DNA mutation creates changes in bacterial genes that eliminate antibiotic activity. Bacteria can share these new resistance genes with their offspring and other bacteria. The overuse and misuse of antibiotics have created a public health crisis, as resistant and multi-resistant bacteria continue to develop. Antibiotics, such as penicillin, are drugs that kill or stop bacterial growth. Bacteria that naturally or artificially acquired antibiotic resistance genes do not respond to antibiotics. Scientists exploit this by designing plasmids—small, self-replicating pieces of DNA—that carry both an antibiotic resistance gene and a gene of interest. Antibiotic resistance is an integral part of DNA cloning that allows a researcher to identify cells that absorbed a DNA of interest. The researcher’s DNA of interest is introduced into bacterial cells using a process called transformation. Bacterial transformation involves temporarily creating small holes in the bacterial cell wall to permit the uptake of external DNA such as a plasmid. Only some bacterial cells absorb new DNA. Since the plasmid includes both the DNA of interest and a gene that confers resistance to a spe

 Core: Biotechnology

Lytic Cycle of Bacteriophages

JoVE 10823

Bacteriophages, also known as phages, are specialized viruses that infect bacteria. A key characteristic of phages is their distinctive “head-tail” morphology. A phage begins the infection process (i.e., lytic cycle) by attaching to the outside of a bacterial cell. Attachment is accomplished via proteins in the phage tail that bind to specific receptor proteins on the outer surface of the bacterium. The tail injects the phage’s DNA genome into the bacterial cytoplasm. In the lytic replication cycle, the phage uses the bacterium’s cellular machinery to make proteins that are critical for the phage’s replication and dispersal. Some of these proteins cause the host cell to take in water and burst, or lyse, after phage replication is complete, releasing hundreds of phages that can infect new bacterial cells. Since the early 20th century, researchers have recognized the potential value of lytic bacteriophages in combating bacterial infections in crops, humans, and agricultural animals. Because each type of phage can infect and lyse only specific types of bacteria, phages represent a highly specific form of anti-bacterial treatment. This quality stands in contrast to the familiar antibiotic drugs that we often take for bacterial infections, which are typically broad-spectrum treatments that kill both pathogenic and beneficial bacteria. The w

 Core: Viruses

Microscopy and Staining: Gram, Capsule, and Endospore Staining

JoVE 10513

Source: Rhiannon M. LeVeque1, Natalia Martin1, Andrew J. Van Alst1, and Victor J. DiRita1
1 Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, United States of America


Bacteria are diverse microorganisms found nearly everywhere on Earth. Many properties help distinguish them from…

 Microbiology

Magnetic Activated Cell Sorting (MACS): Isolation of Thymic T Lymphocytes

JoVE 10495

Source: Meunier Sylvain1,2,3, Perchet Thibaut1,2,3, Sophie Novault4, Rachel Golub1,2,3
1 Unit for Lymphopoiesis, Department of Immunology, Pasteur Institute, Paris, France
2 INSERM U1223, Paris, France
3 Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Cellule Pasteur, Paris, France
4 Flow Cytometry Platfrom, Cytometry and Biomarkers UtechS, …

 Immunology

Genomic DNA in Prokaryotes

JoVE 10758

The genome of most prokaryotic organisms consists of double-stranded DNA organized into one circular chromosome in a region of cytoplasm called the nucleoid. The chromosome is tightly wound, or supercoiled, for efficient storage. Prokaryotes also contain other circular pieces of DNA called plasmids. These plasmids are smaller than the chromosome and often carry genes that confer adaptive functions, such as antibiotic resistance. Although bacterial genomes are much smaller than eukaryotic genomes, they vary considerably in size and gene content. One of the smallest known bacterial genomes is that of Mycoplasma genitalium, a sexually transmitted pathogen that causes urinary and genital tract infections in humans. The M. genitalium genome is 580,076 base pairs long and consists of 559 (476 coding and 83 noncoding) genes. On the other end of the spectrum lies a particular strain of Sorangium cellulosum, a soil-dwelling bacterium. The S. cellulosum genome is enormous for a bacterium at 14,782,125 base pairs long, encoding 11,599 genes. Before the discovery of antibiotics, minor injuries could turn deadly due to the inability to stop simple bacterial infections. The discovery of penicillin in 1928 ushered in the antibiotic era, characterized by revolutionizing medical treatments and an increase in life expectancy. Howe

 Core: Cell Cycle and Division

Lysogenic Cycle of Bacteriophages

JoVE 10824

In contrast to the lytic cycle, phages infecting bacteria via the lysogenic cycle do not immediately kill their host cell. Instead, they combine their genome with the host genome, allowing the bacteria to replicate the phage DNA along with the bacterial genome. The incorporated copy of the phage genome is called the prophage. Some prophages can re-activate and enter the lytic cycle. This often occurs in response to a perturbation, such as DNA damage, but can also transpire in the absence of external cues. In some cases, the genes encoded by prophages can alter the phenotype of the infected bacterium, a process known as lysogenic conversion. Some phages encode proteins or toxins called virulence factors that can facilitate bacterial infections. Through lysogenic conversion, normally non-pathogenic bacteria can become highly virulent via infection by a phage carrying virulence factors. For example, such phages are largely responsible for the pathogenicity of the bacterial species that cause botulism (Clostridium botulinum), diphtheria (Corynebacterium diphtheriae), and cholera (Vibrio cholerae). Without lysogenic conversion, these bacteria do not usually cause disease. A particularly well-studied example of lysogenic conversion is that of the Escherichia coli strain O157:H7. Several massive food recalls have stemmed

 Core: Viruses

What are Viruses?

JoVE 10821

A virus is a microscopic infectious particle that consists of an RNA or DNA genome enclosed in a protein shell. It is not able to reproduce on its own: it can only make more viruses by entering a cell and using its cellular machinery. When a virus infects a host cell, it removes its protein coat and directs the host’s machinery to transcribe and translate its genetic material. The hijacked cell assembles the replicated components into thousands of viral progeny, which can rupture and kill the host cell. The new viruses then go on to infect more host cells. Viruses can infect different types of cells: bacteria, plants, and animals. Viruses that target bacteria, called bacteriophages (or phages), are very abundant. Current research focuses on phage therapy to treat multidrug-resistant bacterial infections in humans. Viruses that infect cultivated plants are also highly studied since epidemics lead to huge crop and economic losses. Viruses were first discovered in the 19th century when an economically-important crop, the tobacco plant, was plagued by a mysterious disease—later identified as Tobacco mosaic virus. Animal viruses are of great importance both in veterinary research and in medical research. Moreover, viruses underlie many human diseases, ranging from the common cold, chickenpox, and herpes, to more dangerous infection

 Core: Viruses

Microbial and Fungal Diversity- Concept

JoVE 10601

Bacteria and fungi are two highly diverse groups of organisms that can have significant beneficial or detrimental impacts on human health. For this reason, it is important to understand and distinguish between individual species of these groups. As you will recall, biological taxonomists group organisms based on their phylogenetic relatedness. The three domains of life, Bacteria, Archaea, and…

 Lab Bio

Diagnostic Necropsy and Tissue Harvest

JoVE 10294

Source: Kay Stewart, RVT, RLATG, CMAR; Valerie A. Schroeder, RVT, RLATG. University of Notre Dame, IN


Many animal experiments rely on final data collection time points that are gathered from the harvesting and testing of organs and tissues. The use of appropriate methods for the collection of organs and tissues can impact the quality of…

 Lab Animal Research

A Multi-well Format Polyacrylamide-based Assay for Studying the Effect of Extracellular Matrix Stiffness on the Bacterial Infection of Adherent Cells

1Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University School of Medicine, 2Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California San Diego, 3Departments of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Immunology and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine

JoVE 57361

 Immunology and Infection

Isolation of Single Intracellular Bacterial Communities Generated from a Murine Model of Urinary Tract Infection for Downstream Single-cell Analysis

1Infectious Diseases Group, Genome Institute of Singapore, 2Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, National University of Singapore, 3Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore

JoVE 58829

 Immunology and Infection

Combined In vivo Optical and µCT Imaging to Monitor Infection, Inflammation, and Bone Anatomy in an Orthopaedic Implant Infection in Mice

1Orthopaedic Hospital Research Center, Orthopaedic Hospital Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), 2PerkinElmer, 3Department of Dermatology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 4Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

JoVE 51612

 Medicine

Investigating the Effects of Probiotics on Pneumococcal Colonization Using an In Vitro Adherence Assay

1Pneumococcal Research, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, 2Allergy & Immune Disorders, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, 3Department of Otolaryngology, The University of Melbourne, 4Department of Microbiology & Immunology at the Peter Doherty Institute for Infection & Immunity, The University of Melbourne

JoVE 51069

 Immunology and Infection

Deciphering and Imaging Pathogenesis and Cording of Mycobacterium abscessus in Zebrafish Embryos

1Dynamique des Interactions Membranaires Normales et Pathologiques, CNRS, UMR 535, Université Montpellier, 2Centre d'études d'agents Pathogènes et Biotechnologies pour la Santé, CNRS, FRE 3689, Université Montpellier, 3Unité de Formation et de Recherche des Sciences de la Santé, EA3647-EPIM, Université Versailles St Quentin

JoVE 53130

 Immunology and Infection

Bovine Mammary Gland Biopsy Techniques

1National Animal Nutrition Program, a National Research Support Project (NRSP-9), Department of Animal and Food Sciences, University of Kentucky, 2School of Performing Arts, Virginia Tech, 3Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, The Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine, Virginia Tech, 4Department of Dairy Science, Virginia Tech, 5Department of Animal Biosciences, University of Guelph, 6School of Visual Arts, Virginia Tech

JoVE 58602

 Biology

Protocols for Investigating the Host-tissue Distribution, Transmission-mode, and Effect on the Host Fitness of a Densovirus in the Cotton Bollworm

1State Key Laboratory for Biology of Plant Diseases and Insect Pests, Institute of Plant Protection, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, 2Tobacco Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, 3Crop and Environment Sciences, Harper Adams University

JoVE 55534

 Immunology and Infection

Antimicrobial Peptides Produced by Selective Pressure Incorporation of Non-canonical Amino Acids

1Department of Biocatalysis, Institute of Chemistry, Technische Universität Berlin, 2Department of Bioenergetics, Institute of Chemistry, Technische Universität Berlin, 3Molecular Genetics Group, Groningen Biomolecular Sciences and Biotechnology Institute, Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Groningen

JoVE 57551

 Bioengineering

Microinjection of CRISPR/Cas9 Protein into Channel Catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, Embryos for Gene Editing

1School of Fisheries, Aquaculture and Aquatic Sciences, Auburn University, 2Department of Animal Wealth Development, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Suez Canal University, 3Anatomy and Embryology Department, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Cairo University, 4Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, Vanderbilt University, 5Life Science Institute, University of Michigan

JoVE 56275

 Genetics

Design of Cecal Ligation and Puncture and Intranasal Infection Dual Model of Sepsis-Induced Immunosuppression

1West China School of Basic Medical Sciences & Forensic Medicine, Sichuan University, 2Department of Biomedical Sciences, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of North Dakota, 3State Key Laboratory of Trauma, Burns and Combined Injury, Institute of Surgery Research, Daping Hospital, Army Medical University

JoVE 59386

 Immunology and Infection

Evaluating Virulence and Pathogenesis of Aeromonas Infection in a Caenorhabditis elegans Model

1Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, 2Department of Internal Medicine, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, 3Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, 4Department of Microbiology and Immunology, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University

JoVE 58768

 Immunology and Infection

A Zebrafish Embryo Model for In Vivo Visualization and Intravital Analysis of Biomaterial-associated Staphylococcus aureus Infection

1Department of Medical Microbiology, Amsterdam UMC, 2Technical Medical Center, Department of Biomaterials Science and Technology, University of Twente, 3Department of Biomedical Engineering, W.J. Kolff Institute, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, 4Institute of Biology, Leiden University

JoVE 58523

 Bioengineering
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