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Brachial Artery: The continuation of the axillary artery; it branches into the radial and ulnar arteries.

Ultrasound Assessment of Flow-Mediated Dilation of the Brachial and Superficial Femoral Arteries in Rats

1Department of Internal Medicine, University of Utah, 2Department of Kinesiology and Health Education, University of Texas at Austin, 3Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, University of Utah, 4Department of Biochemistry, University of Utah, 5Department of Exercise and Sport Science, University of Utah, 6Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, Department of Veterans Affairs

JoVE 54762


Peripheral Vascular Exam Using a Continuous Wave Doppler

JoVE 10123

Source: Joseph Donroe, MD, Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT

Peripheral vascular disease (PVD) is a common condition affecting older adults and includes disease of the peripheral arteries and veins. While the history and physical exam offer clues to its diagnosis, Doppler ultrasound has become a routine part of the bedside vascular examination. The video titled "The Peripheral Vascular Exam" gave a detailed review of the physical examination of the peripheral arterial and venous systems. This video specifically reviews the bedside assessment of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and chronic venous insufficiency using a handheld continuous wave Doppler. The handheld Doppler (HHD) is a simple instrument that utilizes continuous transmission and reception of ultrasound (also referred to as continuous wave Doppler) to detect changes in blood velocity as it courses through a vessel. The Doppler probe contains a transmitting element that emits ultrasound and a receiving element that detects ultrasound waves (Figure 1). The emitted ultrasound is reflected off of moving blood and back to the probe at a frequency directly related to the velocity of blood flow. The reflected signal is detected and transduced to an audible sound with a frequen

 Physical Examinations I

Computerized Dynamic Posturography for Postural Control Assessment in Patients with Intermittent Claudication

1Discipline of Exercise and Sport Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, 2Department of Sport, Health and Exercise Science, University of Hull, 3Academic Vascular Department, Hull Royal Infirmary, Hull and East Yorkshire Hospitals, 4Department of Vascular Surgery, Addenbrookes Hospital

JoVE 51077


Blood Pressure Measurement

JoVE 10083

Source: Meghan Fashjian, ACNP-BC, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston MA

The term blood pressure (BP) describes lateral pressures produced by blood upon the vessel walls. BP is a vital sign obtained routinely in hospital and outpatient settings, and is one of the most common medical assessments performed around the world. It can be determined directly with the intra-arterial catheter or by indirect method, which is a non-invasive, safe, easily reproducible, and thus most used technique. One of the most important applications of BP measurements is the screening, diagnosis, and monitoring of hypertension, a condition that affects almost one third of the U.S. adult population and is one of the leading causes of the cardiovascular disease. BP can be measured automatically by oscillometry or manually by auscultation utilizing a sphygmomanometer, a device with an inflatable cuff to collapse the artery and a manometer to measure the pressure. Determination of the pulse-obliterating pressure by palpation is done prior to auscultation to give a rough estimate of the target systolic pressure. Next, the examiner places a stethoscope over the brachial artery of the patient, inflates the cuff above the expected systolic pressure, and then auscultates while deflating the cuff and o

 Physical Examinations I

Elbow Exam

JoVE 10207

Source: Robert E. Sallis, MD. Kaiser Permanente, Fontana, California, USA

The elbow is a hinged joint that involves the articulation of 3 bones: the humerus, radius, and ulna. It is a much more stable joint than the shoulder, and because of that, the elbow has less range of motion. The elbow and its structures are prone to significant injuries, particularly with repetitive motion. Lateral and medial epicondylitis (also called tennis elbow and golfer's elbow) are two common diagnoses and often occur as a result of occupational activities. When examining the elbow, it is important to remove enough clothing so that the entire shoulder and elbow can be inspected. It is important to compare the injured elbow to the uninvolved side. A systematic evaluation of the elbow includes inspection, palpation, range of motion (ROM) testing, and special tests, including maneuvers to evaluate ligamentous stability and stretch tests to accentuate pain caused by epicondylitis.

 Physical Examinations III

Instrumentation of Near-term Fetal Sheep for Multivariate Chronic Non-anesthetized Recordings

1Département de sciences cliniques, CHUV, Université de Montréal, St-Hyacinthe, QC, 2Département d'obstetriques et de gynécologie, CHU Ste-Justine Research Centre, Université de Montréal, 3Département de neurosciences, CHU Ste-Justine Centre de recherche, Université de Montréal, 4Centre de recherche en reproduction animale (CRRA), Université de Montréal, St-Hyacinthe, QC

JoVE 52581

 Developmental Biology

Peripheral Vascular Exam

JoVE 10122

Source: Joseph Donroe, MD, Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT

The prevalence of peripheral vascular disease (PVD) increases with age and is a significant cause of morbidity in older patients, and peripheral artery disease (PAD) is associated with cardiovascular and cerebrovascular complications. Diabetes, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, and tobacco use are important disease risk factors. When patients become symptomatic, they frequently complain of limb claudication, defined as a cramp-like muscle pain that worsens with activity and improves with rest. Patients with chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) often present with lower extremity swelling, pain, skin changes, and ulceration. While the benefits of screening asymptomatic patients for PVD are unclear, physicians should know the proper exam technique when the diagnosis of PVD is being considered. This video reviews the vascular examination of the upper and lower extremities and abdomen. As always, the examiner should use a systematic method of examination, though in practice, the extent of the exam a physician performs depends on their suspicion of underlying PVD. In a patient who has or is suspected to have risk factors for vascular disease, the vascular exam should be thorough, beginning with inspection, fo

 Physical Examinations I

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