Show Advanced Search

REFINE YOUR SEARCH:

Containing Text
- - -
+
Filter by author or institution
GO
Filter by publication date
From:
October, 2006
Until:
Today
Filter by section

 
 
Cadmium Chloride: A cadmium halide in the form of colorless crystals, soluble in water, methanol, and ethanol. It is used in photography, in dyeing, and calico printing, and as a solution to precipitate sulfides. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed)

Removal of Trace Elements by Cupric Oxide Nanoparticles from Uranium In Situ Recovery Bleed Water and Its Effect on Cell Viability

1Division of Physical Therapy, Department of Orthopedics & Rehabilitation, University of New Mexico, 2Department of Ecosystem Science and Management, University of Wyoming, 3School of Pharmacy, University of Wyoming, 4Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences, Colorado State University, 5Center for Environmental Medicine, Colorado State University, 6College of Pharmacy, California Northstate University

JoVE 52715


 Environment

Soil Nutrient Analysis: Nitrogen, Phosphorus, and Potassium

JoVE 10077

Source: Laboratories of Margaret Workman and Kimberly Frye - Depaul University

In this experiment, three soil macronutrients are chemically extracted, combined with color-based reagents, then analyzed using color to determine the nutrient concentration present in the soil sample.

Nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium are the main components of soil fertilizer. These methods isolate each nutrient from the soil into a solution that can be analyzed using turbidity and color to determine the concentration of nutrients present in the soil sample. Knowing present concentration informs environmental scientists of a nutrient deficiency or surplus in soils used to support plant production, and also provides general insight into basic biogeochemical cycles of an ecosystem.


 Essentials of Environmental Science

LC-MS Analysis of Human Platelets as a Platform for Studying Mitochondrial Metabolism

1Center for Cancer Pharmacology, University of Pennsylvania, 2Center for Excellence in Environmental Toxicology, University of Pennsylvania, 3Penn SRP and Department of Systems Pharmacology and Translational Therapeutics, University of Pennsylvania, 4Division of Traumatology, Department of Surgery, Critical Care and Acute Care Surgery, University of Pennsylvania, 5A.J. Drexel Autism Institute, Drexel University

JoVE 53941


 Environment

Synthesis of Cationized Magnetoferritin for Ultra-fast Magnetization of Cells

1Bristol Centre for Functional Nanomaterials, University of Bristol, 2Department of Materials, Imperial College London, 3Self Assembly Group, CIC nanoGUNE, 4Ikebasque, Basque Foundation for Science, 5School of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, University of Bristol, 6H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol

JoVE 54785


 Bioengineering

Correlative Light- and Electron Microscopy Using Quantum Dot Nanoparticles

1South Western Sydney Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales Australia, 2School of Medicine, Western Sydney University, 3Correlative Microscopy Group, Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, 4Electron Microscopy Laboratory, Department of Anatomical Pathology, Sydney South West Pathology Service, New South Wales Health Pathology, 5School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales Australia

JoVE 54307


 Bioengineering

Dopamine Release at Individual Presynaptic Terminals Visualized with FFNs

1Departments of Neurology, Columbia University, 2Departments of Psychiatry and Pharmacology, Columbia University, 3Department of Chemistry, Columbia University, 4eMolecules, Inc., 5Departments of Neurology and Physiology, University of California School of Medicine, San Francisco, 6Division of Molecular Therapeutics, New York Psychiatric Institute

JoVE 1562


 Biology

Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.

Seeded Synthesis of CdSe/CdS Rod and Tetrapod Nanocrystals

1Department of Chemical Engineering, UC Berkeley, 2Department of Materials Science and Engineering, UC Berkeley, 3Department of Chemistry, UC Berkeley, 4Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 5Department of Chemistry, University of Chicago, 6Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory

JoVE 50731


 Chemistry

Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.

Synthesis of Ligand-free CdS Nanoparticles within a Sulfur Copolymer Matrix

1Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, 2Molecular Engineering and Sciences Institute, University of Washington, 3Clean Energy Institute, University of Washington, 4Institut für Nanospektroskopie, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, 5Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Washington, 6Department of Chemistry, University of Washington

JoVE 54047


 Chemistry

Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.

Nutrients in Aquatic Ecosystems

JoVE 10023

Source: Laboratories of Margaret Workman and Kimberly Frye - Depaul University

Nitrogen and phosphorus are essential plant nutrients found in aquatic ecosystems and both are monitored as a part of water quality testing because in excess amounts they can cause significant water quality problems. 

Nitrogen in water is measured as the common form nitrate (NO3-) that is dissolved in water and readily absorbed by photosynthesizers such as algae. The common form of phosphorus measured is phosphate (PO43-), which is strongly attracted to sediment particles as well as dissolved in water. In excess amounts, both nutrients can cause an increase in aquatic plant growth (algal bloom, Figure 1) that can disrupt the light, temperature, and oxygen levels in the water below and lead to eutrophication and hypoxia (low dissolved oxygen in water) forming a “dead zone” of no biological activity. Sources of nitrates and phosphorus include wastewater treatment plants, runoff from fertilized lawns and agricultural lands, faulty septic systems, animal manure runoff, and industrial waste discharge. Figu


 Essentials of Environmental Science

Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.

Schlenk Lines Transfer of Solvents

JoVE 5679

Source: Hsin-Chun Chiu and Tyler J. Morin, laboratory of Dr. Ian Tonks—University of Minnesota Twin Cities

Schlenk lines and high vacuum lines are both used to exclude moisture and oxygen from reactions by running reactions under a slight overpressure of inert gas (usually N2 or Ar) or under vacuum. Vacuum transfer has been developed as a method separate solvents (other volatile reagents) from drying agents (or other nonvolatile agents) and dispense them to reaction or storage vessels while maintaining an air-free environment. Similar to thermal distillations, vacuum transfer separates solvents by vaporizing and condensing them in another receiving vessel; however, vacuum transfers utilize the low pressure in the manifolds of Schlenk and high vacuum lines to lower boiling points to room temperature or below, allowing for cryogenic distillations. This technique can provide a safer alternative to thermal distillation for the collection of air- and moisture-free solvents. After the vacuum transfer, the water content of the collected solvent can be tested quantitatively by Karl Fischer titration, qualitatively by titration with a Na/Ph2CO solution, or by 1H NMR spectroscopy.


 Essentials of Organic Chemistry

Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
12345678927
More Results...