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Capillary Action: A phenomenon in which the surface of a liquid where it contacts a solid is elevated or depressed, because of the relative attraction of the molecules of the liquid for each other and for those of the solid. (from McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)

Isolation of Single Intracellular Bacterial Communities Generated from a Murine Model of Urinary Tract Infection for Downstream Single-cell Analysis

1Infectious Diseases Group, Genome Institute of Singapore, 2Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, National University of Singapore, 3Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore

Video Coming Soon

JoVE 58829


 JoVE In-Press

Anatomically Inspired Three-dimensional Micro-tissue Engineered Neural Networks for Nervous System Reconstruction, Modulation, and Modeling

1Department of Bioengineering, School of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Pennsylvania, 2Center for Brain Injury & Repair, Department of Neurosurgery, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 3Center for Neurotrauma, Neurodegeneration & Restoration, Michael J. Crescenz Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 4School of Biomedical Engineering, Drexel University

JoVE 55609


 Neuroscience

Production of Genetically Engineered Golden Syrian Hamsters by Pronuclear Injection of the CRISPR/Cas9 Complex

1Department of Animal, Dairy, and Veterinary Sciences, Utah State University, 2National Centre for International Research in Cell and Gene Therapy, Sino-British Research Centre, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Zhengzhou University, 3Department of Animal Science Division of Applied Life Science (BK21 Plus), Gyeongsang National University, 4Institute of Agriculture and Life Science, Gyeongsang National University, 5Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London

JoVE 56263


 Bioengineering

Using a Hemacytometer to Count Cells

JoVE 5048

Many biomedical experiments require manipulation of a known quantity of cells, in order to achieve accurate, reproducible, and statistically-relevant data. Therefore, learning how to count cells is a particularly essential technique for any successful biomedical scientist. The most common way to count cells is by using a hemacytometer - an instrument that bears two laser-etched grids, which aid in the enumeration of an aliquot cells under a simple light microscope. This data can then be used to extrapolate the number of cells in experimental sample. This video will show how to: adjust the experimental sample concentration so that you are not trying to count too many – or too few – cells; how to use a hemacytometer to count a small (~10 μl) aliquot of cells; how to determine which quadrant of the hemacytometer laser grid to use for counting; how to calculate the total number of cells in your experimental sample, depending upon which quadrant was used; and how to determine the viability of your experimental cell population using trypan blue exclusion. Further, various experimental situations for which reliable and accurate determination of cell numbers is necessary, including an example using an automated cell counter, are also discussed.


 Basic Methods in Cellular and Molecular Biology

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