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October, 2006
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Carbon Monoxide: Carbon monoxide (Co). A poisonous colorless, odorless, tasteless gas. It combines with hemoglobin to form carboxyhemoglobin, which has no oxygen carrying capacity. The resultant oxygen deprivation causes headache, dizziness, decreased pulse and respiratory rates, unconsciousness, and death. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)

Assessment of Pulmonary Capillary Blood Volume, Membrane Diffusing Capacity, and Intrapulmonary Arteriovenous Anastomoses During Exercise

1Division of Pulmonary Medicine, University of Alberta, 2Faculty of Physical Education and Recreation, University of Alberta, 3Divisions of Critical Care and Cardiology, University of Alberta, 4Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Alberta, 5G.F. MacDonald Centre for Lung Health

JoVE 54949


Phenotyping Mouse Pulmonary Function In Vivo with the Lung Diffusing Capacity

1Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, 2Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, 3Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

JoVE 52216


Functionalization of Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes with Thermo-reversible Block Copolymers and Characterization by Small-angle Neutron Scattering

1Biology and Soft Matter Division, Neutron Science Directorate, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 2Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 3Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, Pusan National University, 4Jülich Center for Neutron Science, Forschungszentrum Jülich

JoVE 53969


Aerosol-assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition of Metal Oxide Structures: Zinc Oxide Rods

1Instituto de Microelectrónica de Barcelona (IMB-CNM, CSIC), 2SIX Research Centre, Brno University of Technology, 3Institute of Physics of Material, Academy of Science of Czech Republic, 4Institute of Physical Engineering and Central European Institute of Technology, Brno University of Technology

JoVE 56127


Conducting Miller-Urey Experiments

1School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, 2Earth-Life Science Institute, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 3Institute for Advanced Study, 4Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science Directorate, NASA Johnson Space Center, 5Goddard Center for Astrobiology, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 6Geosciences Research Division, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California at San Diego

JoVE 51039


Catalytic Reactor: Hydrogenation of Ethylene

JoVE 10427

Source: Kerry M. Dooley and Michael G. Benton, Department of Chemical Engineering, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA

The hydrogenation of ethylene (C2H4) to ethane (C2H6) has often been studied as a model reduction reaction in characterizing new metal catalysts.1-2 While supported nickel is not the most active metal catalyst for this reaction, it is active enough that reaction can take place at < 200°C. The reaction typically involves adsorbed, dissociated hydrogen (H2) reacting with adsorbed ethylene. In other words, both hydrogen-atoms and ethylene molecules form bonds with a metal site (here denoted "S"). The strong bonding of ethylene with S weakens the double bond sufficiently to allow hydrogen atoms to add to ethylene, forming ethane, which is not adsorbed. The purpose of this experiment is, first, to convert raw composition measurements to limiting reactant fractional conversions.3 These conversions can then be used in a plug-flow reactor (PFR) to fit the data to a standard power-law kinetics model by the "Integral Method".3 A comparison of the experimental orders of reaction for both ethylene and hyd

 Chemical Engineering

The Evolution of Silica Nanoparticle-polyester Coatings on Surfaces Exposed to Sunlight

1School of Science, Faculty of Science, Engineering and Technology, Swinburne University of Technology, 2BlueScope Steel Research, 3Infrared Microspectroscopy Beamline, Australian Synchrotron, 4School of Science, College of Science, Engineering and Health, RMIT University

JoVE 54309


Coordination Chemistry Complexes

JoVE 10179

Source: Laboratory of Dr. Neal Abrams — SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry

Transition metals are found everywhere from vitamin supplements to electroplating baths. Transition metals also make up the pigments in many paints and compose all minerals. Typically, transition metals are found in the cationic form since they readily oxidize, or lose electrons, and are surrounded by electron donors called ligands. These ligands do not form ionic or covalent bonds with the metal center, rather they take on a third type of bond known as coordinate-covalent. The coordinate-covalent bond between a ligand and a metal is dynamic, meaning that ligands are continuously exchanging and re-coordinating around the metal center. The identities of both the metal and the ligand dictates which ligands will bond preferentially over another. In addition, color and magnetic properties are also due to the types of complexes that are formed. The coordination compounds that form are analyzed using a variety of instruments and tools. This experiment explores why so many complexes are possible and uses a spectrochemical (color and chemical) method to help identify the type of coordination complex that forms.

 General Chemistry

Application of Group Theory to IR Spectroscopy

JoVE 10442

Source: Tamara M. Powers, Department of Chemistry, Texas A&M University

Metal carbonyl complexes are used as metal precursors for the synthesis of organometallic complexes as well as catalysts. Infrared (IR) spectroscopy is one of the most utilized and informative characterization methods of CO containing compounds. Group theory, or the use of mathematics to describe the symmetry of a molecule, provides a method to predict the number of IR active C-O vibrational modes within a molecule. Experimentally observing the number of C-O stretches in the IR is a direct method to establish the geometry and structure of the metal carbonyl complex. In this video, we will synthesize the molybdenum carbonyl complex Mo(CO)4[P(OPh)3]2, which can exist in the cis- and trans-forms (Figure 1). We will use group theory and IR spectroscopy to determine which isomer is isolated. Figure 1. The cis- and trans-isomers of Mo(CO)4[P(OPh)3]2.

 Inorganic Chemistry

Heterotopic Renal Autotransplantation in a Porcine Model: A Step-by-Step Protocol

1Multi Organ Transplant Program, Department of Surgery, Toronto General Hospital, 2Division of Nephrology, The Hospital for Sick Children, 3Programa de Doctorat en Medicina, La Universitat Autónoma de Barcelona, 4Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, Toronto General Hospital, 5Department of Medicine, Toronto General Hospital, 6Departments of Surgery (Urology) & Physiology, Developmental & Stem Cell Biology, The Hospital for Sick Children

JoVE 53765


The c-FOS Protein Immunohistological Detection: A Useful Tool As a Marker of Central Pathways Involved in Specific Physiological Responses In Vivo and Ex Vivo

1Sorbonne Paris Cité, Laboratory “Hypoxia & Lung” EA2363, University Paris 13, 2UPMC Univ Paris 06, INSERM, UMR_S1158 Neurophysiologie Respiratoire Expérimentale et Clinique, Sorbonne Universités, 3Laboratory of Excellence GR-Ex, 4Laboratory MOVE (EA 6314), University of Poitiers

JoVE 53613


Induction of Murine Intestinal Inflammation by Adoptive Transfer of Effector CD4+CD45RBhigh T Cells into Immunodeficient Mice

1Center for Gastrointestinal Biology and Disease, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 3Department of Genetics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 4Curriculum in Genetics and Molecular Biology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

JoVE 52533

 Immunology and Infection

Measuring Vital Signs

JoVE 10107

Source: Meghan Fashjian, ACNP-BC, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston MA

The vital signs are objective measurements of a patient's clinical status. There are five commonly accepted vital signs: blood pressure, heart rate, temperature, respiratory rate, and oxygen saturation. In many practices, pain is considered the sixth vital sign and should regularly be documented in the same location as the other vital signs. However, the pain scale is a subjective measurement and, therefore, has a different value according to each individual patient. The vital signs assessment includes estimation of heart rate, blood pressure (demonstrated in a separate video), respiratory rate, temperature, oxygen saturation, and the presence and severity of pain. The accepted ranges for vital signs are: heart rate (HR), 50-80 beats per minute (bpm); respiratory rate (RR), 14-20 bpm; oxygen saturation (SaO2), > 92%; and average oral temperature, ~98.6 °F (37 °C) (average rectal and tympanic temperatures are ~1° higher, and axillary temperature is ~1° lower compared to the average oral temperature). Vital signs serve as the first clue that something may be amiss with a patient, especially if the patient is unable to communicate. Although there are

 Physical Examinations I

Bioluminescence Imaging of Heme Oxygenase-1 Upregulation in the Gua Sha Procedure

1Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 2Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 3Gastrointestinal Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 4Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 5Center for biotechnology and Informatics, The Methodist Hospital Research Institute, 6Department of Radiology, The Methodist Hospital, Weill Cornell Medical College, 7Bejing University of Chinese Medicine, 8Department of Health Technology and Informatics, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, 9Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School

JoVE 1385


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