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Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: The artificial substitution of heart and lung action as indicated for Heart arrest resulting from electric shock, Drowning, respiratory arrest, or other causes. The two major components of cardiopulmonary resuscitation are artificial ventilation (Respiration, Artificial) and closed-chest Cardiac massage.

Utilizing the Modified T-Maze to Assess Functional Memory Outcomes After Cardiac Arrest

1Department of Neurology, Louisiana State University Health Science Center, 2Center for Brain Health, Louisiana State University Health Science Center, 3Department of Cellular Biology and Anatomy, Louisiana State University Health Science Center, 4Department of Neurology, Cerebral Vascular Disease Research Laboratories, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, 5Department of Biomedical Sciences, West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine

JoVE 56694


 Behavior

Basic Life Support: Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Defibrillation

JoVE 10199

Source: Julianna Jung, MD, FACEP, Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Maryland, USA

High-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is the single most important determinant of intact survival in cardiac arrest, and it is critical that all healthcare workers are able to perform this lifesaving technique effectively. Despite the conceptual simplicity of CPR, the reality is that many providers perform it incorrectly, resulting in suboptimal survival outcomes for their patients. This video looks at the essential elements of high-quality CPR, discusses the physiologic basis for each step, and describes how to optimize them in order to enhance survival outcomes. Appropriate prioritization of interventions in cardiac arrest and methods for optimizing resuscitation performance are covered as well.


 Emergency Medicine and Critical Care

Central Venous Catheter Insertion: Femoral Vein

JoVE 10240

Source: James W Bonz, MD, Emergency Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, USA

Central venous access is necessary in a multitude of clinical situations, including vascular access, vasopressor and caustic medication delivery, central venous pressure monitoring, volume resuscitation, total parental nutrition, hemodialysis, and frequent phlebotomy. There are three veins in the body that are accessed for central venous cannulation: the internal jugular, the subclavian, and the femoral. Each of these vessels has distinct advantages and disadvantages with unique anatomical considerations. Femoral vein cannulation can be easily performed both under ultrasound guidance and using the surface landmarks; therefore, femoral access is often used when emergent placement of a central venous catheter (CVC) is needed (such as in the case of medical codes and trauma resuscitations). In addition, cannulation of the femoral artery allows one to simultaneously perform other procedures needed for stabilization, such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and intubation. Successful placement of a femoral CVC requires working understanding of the target anatomy, access to with procedural ultrasound, and fluidity in the Seldinger technique. Seld


 Emergency Medicine and Critical Care

Basic Life Support Part II: Airway/Breathing and Continued Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

JoVE 10232

Source: Julianna Jung, MD, FACEP, Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Maryland, USA

High-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and defibrillation are the most important interventions for patients with cardiac arrest, and should be the first steps that rescuers perform. This is reflected in the American Heart Association's new "CAB" mnemonic. While rescuers were once taught the "ABCs" of cardiac arrest, they now learn "CAB" - circulation first, followed by airway and breathing. Only once CPR is underway (and defibrillation has been performed, if a defibrillator is available) do we consider providing respiratory support. This video will describe the correct technique for providing respiratory support to a patient in cardiac arrest, and how to continue basic life support over the period of time until help arrives. This video assumes that all the steps described in "Basic Life Support Part I: Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Defibrillation" have already been completed. This video does NOT depict the initial steps taken when arriving at the scene of a cardiac arrest.


 Emergency Medicine and Critical Care

A Model to Simulate Clinically Relevant Hypoxia in Humans

1Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital of Bonn, 2Institute of Clinical Chemistry and Clinical Pharmacology, University of Bonn, 3Institute for Terrestrial and Aquatic Wildlife Research, University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, 4Institute of Physiology 2, University of Bonn

JoVE 54933


 Medicine

Esophageal Heat Transfer for Patient Temperature Control and Targeted Temperature Management

1Center for Advanced Design, Research, and Exploration, University of Illinois at Chicago, 2Attune Medical, 3University of Maryland School of Nursing, 4University of Western Ontario, 5University Medical Centre Maribor, 6University of Maryland, 7Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Texas, Southwestern Medical Center

JoVE 56579


 Medicine

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