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Cell Proliferation: All of the processes involved in increasing Cell number including Cell division.

Cell Division - Student Protocol

JoVE 10572

Observing the Cell Cycle in a Root Tip
Hypotheses: The experimental hypothesis is that in root tips slices that have been treated with nocodazole, a chemical that interferes with microtubular polymerization, all of the cells will be arrested at the same stage of the cell cycle and that in untreated onion tip slices all of the different stages of the…

 Lab Bio

An Introduction to Cell Division

JoVE 5640

Cell division is the process by which a parent cell divides and gives rise to two or more daughter cells. It is a means of reproduction for single-cell organisms. In multicellular organisms, cell division contributes to growth, development, repair, and the generation of reproductive cells (sperms and eggs). Cell division is a tightly regulated process, and aberrant cell…

 Cell Biology

Mitosis and Cytokinesis

JoVE 10762

In eukaryotic cells, the cell's cycle—the division cycle—is divided into distinct, coordinated cellular processes that include cell growth, DNA replication/chromosome duplication, chromosome distribution to daughter cells, and finally, cell division. The cell cycle is tightly regulated by its regulatory systems as well as extracellular signals that affect cell proliferation. The processes of the cell cycle occur over approximately 24 hours (in typical human cells) and in two major distinguishable stages. The first stage is DNA replication, during the S phase of interphase. The second stage is the mitotic (M) phase, which involves the separation of the duplicated chromosomes into two new nuclei (mitosis) and cytoplasmic division (cytokinesis). The two phases are separated by intervals (G1 and G2 gaps), during which the cell prepares for replication and division. Mitosis can be divided into five distinct stages—prophase, prometaphase, metaphase, anaphase, and telophase. Cytokinesis, which begins during anaphase or telophase (depending on the cell), is part of the M phase, but not part of mitosis. As the cell enters mitosis, its replicated chromosomes begin to condense and become visible as threadlike structures with the aid of proteins known as condensins. The mitotic spindle apparatus b

 Core: Cell Cycle and Division

An In Vivo Mouse Model to Measure Naïve CD4 T Cell Activation, Proliferation and Th1 Differentiation Induced by Bone Marrow-derived Dendritic Cells

1LamImSys Lab, Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares Carlos III (CNIC), 2LamImSys Lab, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Hospital 12 de Octubre (imas12), 3CIBER de Enfermedades Cardiovasculares

JoVE 58118

 Immunology and Infection

Cancer

JoVE 10987

Cancers arise due to mutations in genes involved in the regulation of cell division, which leads to unrestricted cell proliferation. Modern science and medicine have made great strides in the understanding and treatment of cancer, including eradicating cancer in some patients. However, there is still no cure for cancer. This is largely due to the fact that cancer is a large group of many diseases. Tumors may result in a case where two people have the same mutations in an oncogene or tumor suppressor gene. Initially, the tumors may be very similar. However, the uncontrolled cell division results in new random mutations. As the tumor cells continue to divide, they become more varied. As a result, the two tumors will grow at different rates and undergo angiogenesis and metastasis at different times. The two cancers become so distinct from one another that they will not respond in the same way to the same therapy. This demonstrates why even a particular type of cancer, breast cancer, for example, can be a myriad of different cancers, each disease case with its unique properties, potentially requiring unique treatment approaches. As such, new cancer research and clinical trials focus on tailoring therapeutic approaches specifically for each patient’s genomic and molecular landscape. This is called personalized medicine. On the other hand, chemotherapy a

 Core: Cell Cycle and Division

Autocrine Signaling

JoVE 10973

Secreted signals can act on a variety of target cells. In some cases, the cell that secretes a signal also detects and responds to the signaling molecule it produces; this is called Autocrine Signaling.

Under normal physiological conditions, autocrine signaling is important for homeostasis. This process is well characterized in the macrophages of the immune system. Macrophages secrete a variety of signals including the cytokine Interleukin-1, IL-1. The secreting macrophages also possess membrane receptors for IL-1 that, when bound, can activate an intracellular signaling cascade. The resulting intracellular signals trigger the secretion of additional cytokines including more IL-1 from the target cell. Though IL-1 secreted by these macrophages can also bind to receptors on other cells and cell types, binding to the signaling cell is important in the regulation of signal production. Autocrine signaling is also a major mechanism of cancer cell proliferation. Cancerous cells secrete a variety of growth signals to themselves, through autocrine signaling, and to nearby tissues. For example, progesterone appears to act in an autocrine manner in breast cancer, whereby progesterone binds to progesterone receptors on the signaling cell, stimulating the action of growth-promoting genes. Autocrine signaling can also play a role in the development of skin cancer by stimulat

 Core: Cell Signaling

Monitoring Astrocyte Reactivity and Proliferation in Vitro Under Ischemic-Like Conditions

1Department of Neuroscience, School of Medicine, Universidad Central del Caribe, 2Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Universidad Central del Caribe, 3Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Medical Sciences, Campus, University of Puerto Rico

JoVE 55108

 Neuroscience

Intracellular Signaling Cascades

JoVE 10721

Intracellular signaling cascades amplify a signal originating extracellularly and directs it to its intended intracellular target resulting in transcription, translation, protein modifications, enzyme activation, cellular metabolism, mitosis, and/or apoptosis.

The most basic of signaling cascades involves the activation of second messengers and the release of kinases. Kinases activate or deactivate proteins and enzymes by adding a phosphate group to them. Phosphatases remove phosphate groups resulting in the deactivation or reactivation of proteins. The cyclic AMP (cAMP) pathway is named for its second messenger, cAMP. This pathway is most often initiated when a ligand binds to a G-coupled protein receptor. The G-protein decouples from the receptor and triggers adenylate cyclase to synthesize cAMP from ATP. For each ligand-receptor interaction, multiple cAMP molecules are generated—amplifying the signal. cAMP activates protein kinase A (PKA). PKA is a tetramer molecule with two regulatory subunits and two active subunits. When four cAMP molecules interact with a PKA molecule, it releases the two active subunits. These PKA subunits phosphorylate target proteins and enzymes. In the case of gene expression, PKA activates CREB, a transcription factor in the nucleus. The steps that precede the intracellular signaling cascade that is the lig

 Core: Cell Signaling

Whole Organ Tissue Culture

JoVE 5799

Whole organs can be cultured ex vivo using specialized bioreactors, with the goal of repairing or replacing entire organs. This method uses a donor organ that is stripped of all cells, leaving behind the three-dimensional structure, and is then repopulated with new cells. This video demonstrates the whole organ culture of lungs, and shows how a dynamic culture…

 Bioengineering

An Overview of Genetics and Disease

JoVE 5543

Many human diseases are associated with mutations or variations in genetic sequences. Some of these genetic variants are heritable, passed down from generation to generation, while others arise sporadically during an organism’s life and cause diseases such as cancer. Researchers are trying to identify and characterize these genetic alterations in the hopes of…

 Genetics

Zebrafish Maintenance and Husbandry

JoVE 5152

The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is a powerful vertebrate model system for studying development, modeling disease, and screening for novel therapeutics. Due to their small size, large numbers of zebrafish can be housed in the laboratory at low cost. Although zebrafish are relatively easy to maintain, special consideration must be given to both diet and water quality to in order to optimize …

 Biology II

Target Cell Pre-enrichment and Whole Genome Amplification for Single Cell Downstream Characterization

1Institute of Cell Biology, Histology and Embryology, Medical University of Graz, 2Institute of Pathology, Medical University of Graz, 3Fraunhofer Institute for Toxicology and Experimental Medicine ITEM, 4Department of Tumor Biology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, 5Sahlgrenska Cancer Center, University of Gothenburg

JoVE 56394

 Cancer Research

Identification of Intracellular Signaling Events Induced in Viable Cells by Interaction with Neighboring Cells Undergoing Apoptotic Cell Death

1Section of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, 2Section of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, Jesse Brown Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 3Department of Biology, Kutztown University of Pennsylvania, 4Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, 5Department of Microbiology & Immunology, University of Illinois at Chicago

JoVE 54980

 Biology

Recombinant Collagen I Peptide Microcarriers for Cell Expansion and Their Potential Use As Cell Delivery System in a Bioreactor Model

1Department Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, University Hospital Wuerzburg, 2Translational Center Regenerative Therapies (TLC-RT), Fraunhofer Institute for Silicate Research ISC, 3Fujifilm Manufacturing Europe B.V.

JoVE 57363

 Bioengineering

Analysis of Combinatorial miRNA Treatments to Regulate Cell Cycle and Angiogenesis

1School of Basic Pharmaceutical and Toxicological Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of Louisiana Monroe, 2Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, 3Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center

JoVE 59460

 Cancer Research

Time-lapse Imaging of Primary Preneoplastic Mammary Epithelial Cells Derived from Genetically Engineered Mouse Models of Breast Cancer

1Department of Oncology, Georgetown University, 2Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, 3Stem Cell Dynamics, Helmholtz Zentrum München - German Research Center for Environmental Health, 4Department of Medicine, Georgetown University, 5Department of Nanobiomedical Science and WCU Research Center of Nanobiomedical Science, Dankook University

JoVE 50198

 Medicine

Flow Cytometry Protocols for Surface and Intracellular Antigen Analyses of Neural Cell Types

1Emmy Noether-Group for Stem Cell Biology, Department of Molecular Embryology, Institute of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Freiburg, 2Spemann Graduate School of Biology and Medicine and Faculty of Biology, University of Freiburg, 3School of Life Sciences, Keele University, 4Center for Biological Signaling Studies (BIOSS), University of Freiburg

JoVE 52241

 Neuroscience

Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Culture on Polyvinyl Alcohol-Co-Itaconic Acid Hydrogels with Varying Stiffness Under Xeno-Free Conditions

1Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, National Central University, 2Department of Botany and Microbiology, King Saud University, 3Cathay Medical Research Institute, Cathay General Hospital, 4Graduate Institute of Systems Biology and Bioinformatics, National Central University, 5Department of Medical Microbiology and Parasitology, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 6Department of Internal Medicine, Taiwan Landseed Hospital, 7Department of Zoology, Bharathiar University, 8Thiruvalluvar University

JoVE 57314

 Bioengineering

Fabrication of Extracellular Matrix-derived Foams and Microcarriers as Tissue-specific Cell Culture and Delivery Platforms

1Biomedical Engineering Graduate Program, The University of Western Ontario, 2Department of Anatomy & Cell Biology, Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry, The University of Western Ontario, 3Department of Chemical Engineering, Queen's University, 4Department of Chemical & Biochemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, The University of Western Ontario

JoVE 55436

 Bioengineering

Real Time Detection of In Vitro Tumor Cell Apoptosis Induced by CD8+ T Cells to Study Immune Suppressive Functions of Tumor-infiltrating Myeloid Cells

1Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies and Roslin Institute, University of Edinburgh, 2MRC Centre for Reproductive Health, University of Edinburgh, 3Edinburgh Phenotypic Assay Centre, University of Edinburgh, 4Cancer Research UK Edinburgh Centre, MRC Institute of Genetics, Molecular Medicine, University of Edinburgh

JoVE 58841

 Cancer Research

Light-mediated Reversible Modulation of the Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Pathway during Cell Differentiation and Xenopus Embryonic Development

1Department of Biochemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2Department of Comparative Biosciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 3Neuroscience Program, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 4Center for Biophysics and Quantitative Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

JoVE 55823

 Developmental Biology

Real-time Live-cell Flow Cytometry to Investigate Calcium Influx, Pore Formation, and Phagocytosis by P2X7 Receptors in Adult Neural Progenitor Cells

1Griffith Institute for Drug Discovery, Griffith University, 2Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology, University of Queensland, 3Discipline of Anatomy and Histology, School of Medical Science, University of Sydney, 4Bosch Institute, University of Sydney, 5Applied Neurosciences Program, Peter Duncan Neurosciences Research Unit, St. Vincent's Centre for Applied Medical Research, 6School of Medical Sciences, The University of New South Wales (UNSW) Medicine, Sydney, New South Wales, 7School of Environment and Science, Griffith University, Brisbane, Queensland, 8Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, University of Melbourne

JoVE 59313

 Developmental Biology

A Combined 3D Tissue Engineered In Vitro/In Silico Lung Tumor Model for Predicting Drug Effectiveness in Specific Mutational Backgrounds

1Department of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine (TERM), University Hospital Wuerzburg, 2Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, University Hospital Wuerzburg, 3Department of Bioinformatics, University Wuerzburg, 4Translational Center Wuerzburg, Fraunhofer Institute Interfacial Engineering and Biotechnology IGB

JoVE 53885

 Bioengineering

Bioprintable Alginate/Gelatin Hydrogel 3D In Vitro Model Systems Induce Cell Spheroid Formation

1Department of Mechanical Engineering, McGill University Montreal, 2Department of Bioengineering, McGill University Montreal, 3Department of Molecular Biology, Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica, A.C. (IPICyT), 4Department of Mining and Materials Engineering, McGill University Montreal, 5Department of Biomedical Engineering, McGill University Montreal

JoVE 57826

 Bioengineering

Imaging Cell Interaction in Tracheal Mucosa During Influenza Virus Infection Using Two-photon Intravital Microscopy

1Faculty of Biomedical Sciences, Institute for Research in Biomedicine, Università della Svizzera italiana (USI), 2Graduate School of Cellular and Molecular Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Bern, 3Institute of Computational Science, Università della Svizzera italiana (USI)

JoVE 58355

 Immunology and Infection
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