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Chemical Industry: The aggregate enterprise of manufacturing and technically producing chemicals. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)

Preparation of Giant Vesicles Exhibiting Visible-light-induced Morphological Changes

1Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Applied Science, National Defense Academy of Japan, 2Department of Applied Physics, School of Applied Science, National Defense Academy of Japan, 3Department of Materials Science and Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Niigata University

Video Coming Soon

JoVE 54817


 JoVE In-Press

Preparation of Liquid Crystal Networks for Macroscopic Oscillatory Motion Induced by Light

1Institute for Complex Molecular Systems (ICMS), Technical University of Eindhoven, 2Department of Chemical Engineering and Chemistry, Laboratory of Macromolecular and Organic Chemistry, Technical University of Eindhoven, 3Department of Chemical Engineering and Chemistry, Laboratory for Functional Organic Materials and Devices (SFD), Technical University of Eindhoven

JoVE 56266


 Engineering

Safe Handling of Mineral Acids

JoVE 10370

Source: Robert M. Rioux & Taslima A. Zaman, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA

A mineral acid (or inorganic acid) is defined as a water-soluble acid derived from inorganic minerals by chemical reaction as opposed to organic acids (e.g. acetic acid, formic acid). Examples of mineral acids include: • Boric acid (CAS No.10043-35-3) • Chromic acid (CAS No.1333-82-0) • Hydrochloric acid (CAS No.7647-01-0) • Hydrofluoric acid (CAS No. 7664-39-3) • Nitric acid (CAS No. 7697-37-2) • Perchloric acid (CAS No. 7601-90-3) • Phosphoric acid (CAS No.7664-38-2) • Sulfuric acid (CAS No.7664-93-9) Mineral acids are commonly found in research laboratories and their corrosive nature makes them a significant safety risk. Since they are important reagents in the research laboratory and often do not have substitutes, it is important that they are handled properly and with care. Some acids are even shock sensitive and under certain conditions may cause explosions (i.e., salts of perchloric acid).


 Lab Safety

Microfluidic-based Synthesis of Covalent Organic Frameworks (COFs): A Tool for Continuous Production of COF Fibers and Direct Printing on a Surface

1Institute of Chemical and Bioengineering, Department of Chemistry and Applied Bioscience, ETH Zurich, 2Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 3Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Universidad de Granada, 4Institut de Ciència de Materials de Barcelona (ICMAB-CSIC), 5School of Chemistry, University of Nottingham, 6Condensed Matter Physics Center (IFMAC), Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 7Instituto Madrileño de Estudios Avanzados en Nanociencia (IMDEA Nanociencia)

JoVE 56020


 Chemistry

Capillary-based Centrifugal Microfluidic Device for Size-controllable Formation of Monodisperse Microdroplets

1Department of Computational Intelligence and Systems Science, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2Graduate School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 3Department of Mechanical Engineering, Keio University, 4PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency

JoVE 53860


 Engineering

Removal of Branched and Cyclic Compounds by Urea Adduction for Uk'37 Paleothermometry

JoVE 10160

Source: Laboratory of Jeff Salacup - University of Massachusetts Amherst

As mentioned in previous videos, the product of an organic solvent extraction, a total lipid extract (TLE), is often a complex mixture of hundreds, if not thousands, of different compounds. The researcher is often only interested in a handful of compounds. In the case of our two organic paleothermometers (Uk'37 and MBT/CBT), the interest is in only 6 compounds (2 alkenones and 4 isoprenoidal glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers). As discussed in the previous two videos in this series, purification techniques may be applied in order to pare down the number of compounds in an analyzed sample. These techniques may chemically alter the unwanted components (saponification), take advantage of the different compound chemistries (column chromatography), or use the different shapes and sizes of the molecules to include or exclude certain components from the analysis (urea adduction). The atomic structure of different chemicals leads some organic compounds to form long, narrow, straight chains (n-alkanes and alkenones), other organic compounds to form complex cyclic structures, others to form highly-branched structures, and yet others which form both cyclic and branched structures (GDGTs) (Figure 1). The different


 Earth Science

Lewis Acid-Base Interaction in Ph3P-BH3

JoVE 10316

Source: Tamara M. Powers, Department of Chemistry, Texas A&M University 

One of the goals of chemistry is to use models that account for trends and provide insights into the properties of reactants that contribute to reactivity. Substances have been classified as acids and bases since the time of the ancient Greeks, but the definition of acids and bases has been modified and expanded over the years.1 The ancient Greeks would characterize substances by taste, and defined acids as those that were sour-tasting, such as lemon juice and vinegar. The term "acid" is derived from the Latin term for "sour-tasting." Bases were characterized by their ability to counteract or neutralize acids. The first bases characterized were those of ashes from a fire, which were mixed with fats to make soap. In fact, the term "alkaline" is derived from the Arabic word for "roasting." Indeed, it has been known since ancient times that acids and bases can be combined to give a salt and water. The first widely-used description of an acid is that of the Swedish chemist, Svante Arrhenius, who in 1894 defined acids as substances which dissociate in water to give hydronium ions, and bases as substances which dissociate in water to give


 Inorganic Chemistry

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