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Chromatography, Paper: An analytical technique for resolution of a chemical mixture into its component compounds. Compounds are separated on an adsorbent paper (stationary phase) by their varied degree of solubility/mobility in the eluting solvent (mobile phase).

Quantification of the Immunosuppressant Tacrolimus on Dried Blood Spots Using LC-MS/MS

1iC42 Clinical Research and Development, University of Colorado, Anschutz Medical Campus, 2Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, 3Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Center of Drug Evaluation Research - Office of Generic Drugs, 4Transplant Clinical Research, University of Cincinnati

JoVE 52424


 Medicine

A Convenient Method for Extraction and Analysis with High-Pressure Liquid Chromatography of Catecholamine Neurotransmitters and Their Metabolites

1School of Public Health of Southeast University, Laboratory of Environment and Biosafety Research Institute of Southeast University in Suzhou, 2Key Laboratory of Child Development and Learning Science (Ministry of Education), School of Biological Science & Medical Engineering, Southeast University, 3School of Public Health, Tianjin Medical University, 4British Columbia Academy, Nanjing Foreign Language School

Video Coming Soon

JoVE 56445


 JoVE In-Press

Construction of Models for Nondestructive Prediction of Ingredient Contents in Blueberries by Near-infrared Spectroscopy Based on HPLC Measurements

1United Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2Faculty of Agriculture, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 3Institute of Agriculture, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology

JoVE 53981


 Chemistry

Internal Standards

JoVE 10225

Source: Laboratory of Dr. B. Jill Venton - University of Virginia

The goal of many chemical analyses is a quantitative analysis, where the amount of a substance in a sample is determined. In order to accurately calculate the concentration of an unknown from a sample, careful sample preparation is key. Every time a sample is handled or transferred, some of the sample can be lost. There are strategies however, for minimizing sample loss. There are also strategies for coping with sample loss and still making accurate measurements of concentration. To minimize sample loss, the ideal is to minimize the number of sample handling and transfer steps. For example, massing a solid sample directly into a flask that a solution will be made in reduces a transfer step. If it's necessary to transfer from one flask to another and a dilution is being made, then triple rinsing the glassware helps ensure all the sample is transferred. Other strategies are more specific to the sample. For example, samples that adsorb to glass, such as proteins, might better be handled in polypropylene disposable tubes. The tubes are not hydrophilic, so if a small amount of sample is to be pipetted in water, it is best to have already added the water to the tube, so the sample can be pipetted directly into the solve


 Analytical Chemistry

Conducting Miller-Urey Experiments

1School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, 2Earth-Life Science Institute, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 3Institute for Advanced Study, 4Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science Directorate, NASA Johnson Space Center, 5Goddard Center for Astrobiology, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 6Geosciences Research Division, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California at San Diego

JoVE 51039


 Chemistry

Preparation of Giant Vesicles Exhibiting Visible-light-induced Morphological Changes

1Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Applied Science, National Defense Academy of Japan, 2Department of Applied Physics, School of Applied Science, National Defense Academy of Japan, 3Department of Materials Science and Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Niigata University

Video Coming Soon

JoVE 54817


 JoVE In-Press

Isolation and Preparation of Bacterial Cell Walls for Compositional Analysis by Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography

1Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, 2Department of Molecular Biology and Laboratory for Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research, Umeå University, 3Campus de Cantoblanco, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 4Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine

JoVE 51183


 Chemistry

Assessment of Dopaminergic Homeostasis in Mice by Use of High-performance Liquid Chromatography Analysis and Synaptosomal Dopamine Uptake

1Molecular Neuropharmacology and Genetics Laboratory, Lundbeck Foundation Center for Biomembranes in Nanomedicine, Department of Neuroscience and Pharmacology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, 2Laboratory of Neuropsychiatry, Psychiatric Center Copenhagen and Department of Neuroscience and Pharmacology, University of Copenhagen

JoVE 56093


 Neuroscience

Sample Extraction and Simultaneous Chromatographic Quantitation of Doxorubicin and Mitomycin C Following Drug Combination Delivery in Nanoparticles to Tumor-bearing Mice

1Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toronto, 2Departments of Medical Biophysics and Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Ontario Cancer Institute, University Health Network

JoVE 56159


 Cancer Research

Performing 1D Thin Layer Chromatography

JoVE 5499

Source: Laboratory of Dr. Yuri Bolshan — University of Ontario Institute of Technology

Thin layer chromatography (TLC) is a chromatographic method used to separate mixtures of non-volatile compounds. A TLC plate consists of a thin layer of adsorbent material (the stationary phase) fixed to an appropriate solid support such as plastic, aluminum, or glass1. The sample(s) and reference compound(s) are dissolved in an appropriate solvent and applied near the bottom edge of the TLC plate in small spots. The TLC plate is developed by immersing the bottom edge in the developing solvent consisting of an appropriate mobile phase. Capillary action allows the mobile phase to move up the adsorbent layer. As the solvent moves up the TLC plate, it carries with it the components of each spot and separates them based on their physical interactions with the mobile and stationary phases.


 Organic Chemistry

Protocols for Implementing an Escherichia coli Based TX-TL Cell-Free Expression System for Synthetic Biology

1Department of Biology, California Institute of Technology, 2Department of Bioengineering, California Institute of Technology, 3Synthetic Biology Center, Department of Bioengineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 4School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota

JoVE 50762


 Biology

A Lectin HPLC Method to Enrich Selectively-glycosylated Peptides from Complex Biological Samples

1Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, University of California, San Francisco - UCSF, 2Buck Institute for Age Research, 3Department of Chemistry, Purdue University

JoVE 1398


 Biology

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