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Alginate Microcapsule as a 3D Platform for Propagation and Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells (hESC) to Different Lineages

1Stem Cell Lab, School of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, The University of New South Wales, 2Siriraj Center of Excellence for Stem cell Research, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, 3Neuropsychiatric Institute, Prince of Wales Hospital

JoVE 3608


 Bioengineering

Ophthalmoscopic Examination

JoVE 10146

Source: Richard Glickman-Simon, MD, Assistant Professor, Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine, MA

The simplest ophthalmoscopes consist of an aperture to look through, a diopter indicator, and a disc for selecting lenses. The ophthalmoscope is primarily used to examine the fundus, or the inner wall of the posterior eye, which consists of the choroid, retina, fovea, macula, optic disc, and retinal vessels (Figure 1). The spherical eyeball collects and focuses light on the neurosensory cells of the retina. Light is refracted as it passes sequentially through the cornea, the lens, and the vitreous body. The first landmark observed during the funduscopic exam is the optic disc, which is where the optic nerve and retinal vessels enter the back of the eye (Figure 2). The disc usually contains a central whitish physiologic cup where the vessels enter; it normally occupies less than half the diameter of the entire disc. Just lateral and slightly inferior is the fovea, a darkened circular area that demarcates the point of central vision. Around this is the macula. A blind spot approximately 15° temporal to the line of gaze results from a lack of photoreceptor cells at the optic disc.

Pulse Wave Velocity Testing in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging

1Clinical Research Branch, National Institute of Aging

JoVE 50817


 Medicine

Use of a Caspase Multiplexing Assay to Determine Apoptosis in a Hypothalamic Cell Model

1Department of Veterans Affairs, Minneapolis Veterans Affairs Health Care System, 2Department of Food Science and Nutrition, University of Minnesota, 3Department of Integrative Biology and Physiology, University of Minnesota, 4Department of Medicine, University of Minnesota Medical School, University of Minnesota

JoVE 51305


 Neuroscience

Cardiac Exam I: Inspection and Palpation

JoVE 10071

Source: Suneel Dhand, MD, Attending Physician, Internal Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

The cardiac assessment is one of the core examinations performed by almost every physician whenever encountering a patient. Disorders of the cardiac system are among the most common reasons for hospital admission, with conditions ranging from myocardial infarction to congestive heart failure. Learning a complete and thorough cardiac examination is therefore crucial for any practicing physician. If there is pathology in the heart or circulatory system, the consequences can also be manifested in other bodily areas, including the lungs, abdomen, and legs. Many physicians instinctively reach straight for their stethoscopes when performing cardiac exams. However, a large amount of information is gained before auscultation by going through the correct sequence of examination, starting with inspection and palpation.


 Physical Examinations I

Observation and Inspection

JoVE 10119

Source: Jaideep S. Talwalkar, MD, Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT

Observation and inspection is fundamental to physical examination and begins at the first point of contact with a patient. While observation and inspection are often used interchangeably, observation is a general term that refers to the careful use of one's senses to gain information. Inspection is an act limited to what one can observe visually, and when referring to physical examination, typically refers to findings on the surface of the body, rather than to behaviors. Skilled clinicians utilize all of their senses to assist with gaining an understanding of their patients, relying on vision, touch (percussion and palpation), and hearing (percussion and auscultation) primarily. Smell can also provide important diagnostic information during the patient encounter (e.g., personal hygiene, substance use, or metabolic diseases). Fortunately the sense of taste is largely a historical relic in medicine, though it is interesting to note that diabetes mellitus was diagnosed for many centuries by the sweet taste of the urine. Through experience, clinicians develop an important sixth sense - the gut instinct - that can only be gained through deliberate practice of clinical skills on thousands of pati


 Physical Examinations I

Hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic Clamps in Conscious, Unrestrained Mice

1Diabetes and Obesity Research Center, Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute at Lake Nona, 2Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, 3Vanderbilt Mouse Metabolic Phenotyping Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, 4Department of Pediatrics and Cellular and Integrative Physiology, Indiana University School of Medicine

JoVE 3188


 Medicine

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