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Diffusion Tensor Imaging: The use of diffusion Anisotropy data from diffusion magnetic resonance imaging results to construct images based on the direction of the faster diffusing molecules.

Using Diffusion Tensor Imaging in Traumatic Brain Injury

JoVE 10276

Source: Laboratories of Jonas T. Kaplan and Sarah I. Gimbel—University of Southern California

Traditional brain imaging techniques using MRI are very good at visualizing the gross structures of the brain. A structural brain image made with MRI provides high contrast of the borders between gray and white matter, and information about the size and shape of brain structures. However, these images do not detail the underlying structure and integrity of white matter networks in the brain, which consist of axon bundles that interconnect local and distant brain regions. Diffusion MRI uses pulse sequences that are sensitive to the diffusion of water molecules. By measuring the direction of diffusion, it is possible to make inferences about the structure of white matter networks in the brain. Water molecules within an axon are constrained in their movements by the cell membrane; instead of randomly moving in every direction with equal probability (isotropic movement), they are more likely to move in certain directions, in parallel with the axon (anisotropic movement; Figure 1). Therefore, measures of diffusion anisotropy are thought to reflect properties of the white matter such as fiber density, axon thickness, and degree of myelination. One common measure is fractional anisotropy


 Neuropsychology

Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Skeletal Muscle Disease

1Institute of Imaging Science, Vanderbilt University, 2Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Vanderbilt University, 3Department of Biomedical Engineering, Vanderbilt University, 4Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, Vanderbilt University, 5Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Vanderbilt University, 6Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University

JoVE 52352


 Medicine

Fiber Connections of the Supplementary Motor Area Revisited: Methodology of Fiber Dissection, DTI, and Three Dimensional Documentation

1Department of Neurosurgery, University of Minnesota, 2Department of Neurosurgery, Barrow Neurological Institute, St. Josephs Hospital and Medical Center, 3Department of Radiology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 4Department of Radiology, University of Minnesota, 5Department of Neurosurgery, Tepecik Training and Research Hospital, 6Department of Neurosurgery, Cerrahpasa Medical School, University of Istanbul

JoVE 55681


 Neuroscience

An Investigation of the Effects of Sports-related Concussion in Youth Using Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and the Head Impact Telemetry System

1Graduate Department of Rehabilitation Science, University of Toronto, 2Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of Toronto, 3Department of Psychology, University of Toronto, 4Bloorview Kids Rehab, 5Toronto Rehab, 6Cognitive Neurology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, 7Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto

JoVE 2226


 Medicine

3D Ultrasound Imaging: Fast and Cost-Effective Morphometry of Musculoskeletal Tissue

1Laboratory for Myology, Department of Human Movement Sciences, Faculty of Behavioural and Movement Sciences, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam Movement Sciences, 2Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, VU University Medical Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam Movement Sciences

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JoVE 55943


 JoVE In-Press

fMRI: Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

JoVE 5212

Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a non-invasive neuroimaging technique used to investigate human brain function and cognition in both healthy individuals and populations with abnormal brain states. Functional MRI utilizes a magnetic resonance signal to detect changes in blood flow that are coupled to neuronal activation when a specific task is performed. This is possible because hemoglobin within the blood has different magnetic properties depending on whether or not it is bound to oxygen. When a certain task is performed, there is an influx of oxygenated blood to brain regions responsible for that function, and this influx can then be detected with specific MRI scan parameters. This phenomenon is termed the blood oxygen level ependent (BOLD) effect, and can be used to create maps of brain activity. This video begins with a brief overview of how MRI and fMRI signal is obtained. Then, basic experimental design is reviewed, which involves first setting up a stimulus presentation that is specifically designed to test the function that will be mapped. Next, key steps involved in performing the fMRI scan are introduced, including subject safety and setting up at the scanner. Commonly used steps for data processing are then presented, including pre-processing and statistical analysis with the general linear


 Neuroscience

Anatomical Reconstructions of the Human Cardiac Venous System using Contrast-computed Tomography of Perfusion-fixed Specimens

1Department of Surgery, University of Minnesota, 2Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Minnesota, 3Department of Biology, University of Minnesota, 4Department of Integrative Biology & Physiology, University of Minnesota, 5Institute for Engineering in Medicine, University of Minnesota

JoVE 50258


 Bioengineering

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Real-time Iontophoresis with Tetramethylammonium to Quantify Volume Fraction and Tortuosity of Brain Extracellular Space

1Department of Medicine, University of Virginia, 2Department of Cell Biology, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, 3Neural and Behavioral Science Graduate Program, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, 4Division of Neonatology, University of Virginia, 5Department of Neuroscience and Physiology, New York University School of Medicine,

JoVE 55755


 Neuroscience

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A Method for Determination and Simulation of Permeability and Diffusion in a 3D Tissue Model in a Membrane Insert System for Multi-well Plates

1Institute of Bioprocess and Biosystems Engineering, Hamburg University of Technology, 2Institute of Biotechnology, Department Medical Biotechnology, Technische Universität Berlin, 3TissUse GmbH

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JoVE 56412


 JoVE In-Press

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Discovering Middle Ear Anatomy by Transcanal Endoscopic Ear Surgery: A Dissection Manual

1Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, University of Bern, 2Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery, University Hospital of Modena, 3Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery, University Hospital of Verona, 4Artificial Hearing Research, Artorg Center for Biomedical Engineering, University of Bern

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JoVE 56390


 JoVE In-Press

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SNARE-mediated Fusion of Single Proteoliposomes with Tethered Supported Bilayers in a Microfluidic Flow Cell Monitored by Polarized TIRF Microscopy

1Department of Cellular and Molecular Physiology, Yale University School of Medicine, 2Nanobiology Institute, Yale University, 3Department of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry, Yale University, 4Laboratoire de Neurophotonique, Université Paris Descartes, Faculté des Sciences Fondamentales et Biomédicales, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS)

JoVE 54349


 Neuroscience

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Using Confocal Analysis of Xenopus laevis to Investigate Modulators of Wnt and Shh Morphogen Gradients

1Department of Biomedical Science, The Bateson Centre, University of Sheffield, 2Institute of Genetic Medicine, Newcastle University, 3Department of Cardiovascular Science, The Bateson Centre, University of Sheffield, 4School of Biochemistry, University of Bristol, 5Biology Department, University of York

JoVE 53162


 Developmental Biology

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Metabolic Support of Excised, Living Brain Tissues During Magnetic Resonance Microscopy Acquisition

1Department of Neuroscience, University of Florida, 2McKnight Brain Institute, University of Florida, 3Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, 4Center for Functionally Integrative Neuroscience, Aarhus University, 5Department of Radiology, University of Florida, 6National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Florida State University

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JoVE 56282


 JoVE In-Press

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