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DNA Repair: The reconstruction of a continuous two-stranded DNA molecule without mismatch from a molecule which contained damaged regions. The major repair mechanisms are excision repair, in which defective regions in one strand are excised and resynthesized using the complementary base pairing information in the intact strand; photoreactivation repair, in which the lethal and mutagenic effects of ultraviolet light are eliminated; and post-replication repair, in which the primary lesions are not repaired, but the gaps in one daughter duplex are filled in by incorporation of portions of the other (undamaged) daughter duplex. Excision repair and post-replication repair are sometimes referred to as "dark repair" because they do not require light.

Nucleotide Excision Repair

JoVE 10792

Exposure to mutagens can damage DNA and result in bulky lesions that distort the double-helix structure or impede proper transcription. Damaged DNA can be detected and repaired in a process called nucleotide excision repair (NER). NER employs a set of specialized proteins that first scan DNA to detect a damaged region. Next, NER proteins separate the strands and excise the damaged area. Finally, they coordinate the replacement with new, matching nucleotides. Cells are regularly exposed to mutagens—factors in the environment which can damage DNA and generate mutations. UV radiation is one of the most common mutagens and is estimated to introduce a significant number of changes to DNA. These include bends or kinks in the structure which can block DNA replication or transcription. If these errors are not fixed, the damage can cause mutations which in turn can result in cancer or disease depending on which sequences are disrupted. Nucleotide excision repair relies on specific protein complexes to recognize damaged regions of DNA and flag them for removal and repair. In prokaryotes, the process involves three proteins—UvrA, UvrB, and UvrC. The first two proteins work together as a complex, traveling along the DNA strands to detect any physical aberrations. Once identified, the strands at the damaged location are separated, and endon

 Core: Biology

Enzyme Assays and Kinetics

JoVE 5692

Enzyme kinetics describes the catalytic effects of enzymes, which are biomolecules that facilitate chemical reactions necessary for living organisms. Enzymes act on molecules, referred to as substrates, to form products. Enzyme kinetic parameters are determined via assays that directly or indirectly measure changes in substrate or product concentration over time. 


This video…

 Biochemistry

Quantitative, Real-time Analysis of Base Excision Repair Activity in Cell Lysates Utilizing Lesion-specific Molecular Beacons

1Department of Pharmacology & Chemical Biology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, 2Hillman Cancer Center, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, 3Department of Experimental Therapy, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, 4Department of Human Genetics, University of Pittsburgh School of Public Health

JoVE 4168

 Biology

Genome Editing

JoVE 5554

A well-established technique for modifying specific sequences in the genome is gene targeting by homologous recombination, but this method can be laborious and only works in certain organisms. Recent advances have led to the development of “genome editing”, which works by inducing double-strand breaks in DNA using engineered nuclease enzymes guided to target…

 Genetics

Proofreading

JoVE 10790

Synthesis of new DNA molecules starts when DNA polymerase links nucleotides together in a sequence that is complementary to the template DNA strand. DNA polymerase has a higher affinity for the correct base to ensure fidelity in DNA replication. The DNA polymerase furthermore proofreads during replication, using an exonuclease domain that cuts off incorrect nucleotides from the nascent DNA strand. Genomic DNA is synthesized in the 5’ to 3’ direction. Each cell contains a number of DNA polymerases that play different roles in synthesizing and correcting mistakes in DNA; DNA polymerase delta and epsilon possess proofreading ability when replicating nuclear DNA. These polymerases “read” each base after it is added to the new strand. If the newly-added base is incorrect, the polymerase reverses direction (moving from 3’ to 5’) and uses an exonucleolytic domain to cut off the incorrect base. Subsequently, it is replaced with the correct base. Proofreading is important for preventing mutations from occurring in newly-synthesized DNA, but what happens when the proofreading mechanism fails? When a mutation alters the exonuclease domain of DNA polymerase, it loses the ability to remove incorrect nucleotides. In consequence, mutations can accumulate rapidly throughout the genome. This type of mutation has been linked to

 Core: Biology

Transgenic Organisms

JoVE 10809

Transgenic organisms are genetically engineered to carry transgenes—genes from a different species—as part of their genome. The transgene may either be a different version of one of the organism’s genes or a gene that does not exist in their genome. Transgenes are usually generated by recombinant DNA and DNA cloning techniques. Transgenic bacteria, plants, and animals allow scientists to address biological queries and design practical solutions. Scientists begin the process of transgenesis—introducing a transgene into an organism’s genome—by selecting an appropriate technique. There are several biological, chemical, and physical methods of transgenesis. A common biological method involves the virus-mediated introduction of foreign DNA into a host cell genome, called transduction. A popular chemical method uses calcium phosphate (Ca3(PO4)2). The method is based on the formation of a Ca3(PO4)2/DNA precipitate to facilitate DNA binding to and entering cells. Physical methods such as microinjection—a technique that uses a thin, glass needle to manually insert genetic material into cells—artificially introduce DNA by force. Once inside the cell, a transgene can either integrate randomly or at a specific site in the genome with the help of DNA repa

 Core: Biology

Protein Crystallization

JoVE 5689

Protein crystallization, obtaining a solid lattice of biomolecules, elucidates protein structure and enables the study of protein function. Crystallization involves drying purified protein under a combination of many factors, including pH, temperature, ionic strength, and protein concentration. Once crystals are obtained, the protein structure can be elucidated by x-ray diffraction and…

 Biochemistry

An Introduction to Saccharomyces cerevisiae

JoVE 5081

Saccharomyces cerevisiae (commonly known as baker’s yeast) is a single-celled eukaryote that is frequently used in scientific research. S. cerevisiae is an attractive model organism due to the fact that its genome has been sequenced, its genetics are easily manipulated, and it is very easy to maintain in the lab. Because many yeast proteins are similar in sequence and function…

 Biology I

Chromatin Immunoprecipitation

JoVE 5551

Histones are proteins that help organize DNA in eukaryotic nuclei by serving as “scaffolds” around which DNA can be wrapped, forming a complex called “chromatin”. These proteins can be modified through the addition of chemical groups, and these changes affect gene expression. Researchers use a technique called chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) to …

 Genetics

Live Cell Imaging of Mitosis

JoVE 5642

Mitosis is a form of cell division in which a cell’s genetic material is divided equally between two daughter cells. Mitosis can be broken down into six phases, during each of which the cell’s components, such as its chromosomes, show visually distinct characteristics. Advances in fluorescence live cell imaging have allowed scientists to study this process in…

 Cell Biology

Laser Microirradiation to Study In Vivo Cellular Responses to Simple and Complex DNA Damage

1Department of Biological Chemistry, School of Medicine, University of California, Irvine, 2Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic, University of California, Irvine, 3Department of Developmental and Cell Biology, School of Biological Sciences, University of California, Irvine, 4Department of Biomedical Engineering and Surgery, University of California, Irvine

JoVE 56213

 Genetics

Quantification of three DNA Lesions by Mass Spectrometry and Assessment of Their Levels in Tissues of Mice Exposed to Ambient Fine Particulate Matter

1Departamento de Análises Clínicas e Toxicológicas, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade de São Paulo, 2Departamento de Farmacociências, Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre, 3Laboratório de Poluição Atmosfêrica Experimental - LIM05, Hospital das Clínicas, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, 4Instituto de Estudos Avançados, Universidade de São Paulo, 5Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto de Química, Universidade de São Paulo

JoVE 59734

 Immunology and Infection

Identifying DNA Mutations in Purified Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells

1Greehey Children's Cancer Research Institute, UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, 2Department of Cellular and Structural Biology, UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, 3Department of Pathology, UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, 4Department of Microbiology, UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, 5Cancer Therapy and Research Center, UT Health Science Center at San Antonio

JoVE 50752

 Immunology and Infection

Quantitation and Analysis of the Formation of HO-Endonuclease Stimulated Chromosomal Translocations by Single-Strand Annealing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

1Irell & Manella Graduate School of Biological Sciences, 2Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center and Beckman Research Institute, 3Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Southern California, Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center

JoVE 3150

 Biology

Enhanced Genome Editing with Cas9 Ribonucleoprotein in Diverse Cells and Organisms

1Department of Molecular Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, 2Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of California, Berkeley, 3Innovative Genomics Institute, University of California, Berkeley, 4Biomedical Sciences Graduate Program, University of California, San Francisco, 5Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of California, San Francisco, 6Diabetes Center, University of California, San Francisco, 7Chan Zuckerberg Biohub, 8Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, 9UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, 10Department of Integrative Biology, University of California, Berkeley

JoVE 57350

 Genetics

Modified Terminal Restriction Fragment Analysis for Quantifying Telomere Length Using In-gel Hybridization

1Departments of Pathology and Infectious Diseases and Microbiology, University of Pittsburgh, 2University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, 3Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, University of Pittsburgh, 4Departments of Psychiatry, Psychology, Behavioral & Community Health Sciences, University of Pittsburgh

JoVE 56001

 Cancer Research

Genetic Manipulation of the Plant Pathogen Ustilago maydis to Study Fungal Biology and Plant Microbe Interactions

1Institute for Microbiology, Heinrich-Heine University Düsseldorf, 2Bioeconomy Science Center (BioSC), 3Department of Genetics, Institute of Applied Biosciences, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 4Cluster of Excellence in Plant Sciences (CEPLAS), Heinrich-Heine University Düsseldorf

JoVE 54522

 Genetics
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