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Drug Discovery: The process of finding chemicals for potential therapeutic use.

Zebrafish Maintenance and Husbandry

JoVE 5152

The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is a powerful vertebrate model system for studying development, modeling disease, and screening for novel therapeutics. Due to their small size, large numbers of zebrafish can be housed in the laboratory at low cost. Although zebrafish are relatively easy to maintain, special consideration must be given to both diet and water quality to in order to optimize fish health and reproductive success. This video will provide an overview of zebrafish husbandry and maintenance in the lab. After a brief review of the natural zebrafish habitat, techniques essential to recreating this environment in the lab will be discussed, including key elements of fish facility water recirculation systems and the preparation of brine shrimp as part of the zebrafish diet. Additionally, the presentation will include information on how specific zebrafish strains are tracked in a laboratory setting, with specific reference to the collection of tail fin samples for DNA extraction and genotyping. Finally, experimental modifications of the zebrafish environment will be discussed as a means to further our understanding of these fish, and in turn, ourselves.


 Biology II

Imaging- and Flow Cytometry-based Analysis of Cell Position and the Cell Cycle in 3D Melanoma Spheroids

1The Centenary Institute, 2Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, 3The University of Queensland Diamantina Institute, Translational Research Institute, The University of Queensland, 4Department of Dermatology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, 5Discipline of Dermatology, University of Sydney

JoVE 53486


 Medicine

Growing Crystals for X-ray Diffraction Analysis

JoVE 10216

Source: Laboratory of Dr. Jimmy Franco - Merrimack College

X-ray crystallography is a method commonly used to determine the spatial arrangement of atoms in a crystalline solid, which allows for the determination of the three-dimensional shape of a molecule or complex. Determining the three-dimensional structure of a compound is of particular importance, since a compound's structure and function are intimately related. Information about a compound's structure is often used to explain its behavior or reactivity. This is one of the most useful techniques for solving the three-dimensional structure of a compound or complex, and in some cases it may be the only viable method for determining the structure. Growing X-ray quality crystals is the key component of X-ray crystallography. The size and quality of the crystal is often highly dependent on the composition of the compound being examined by X-ray crystallography. Typically compounds containing heavier atoms produce a greater diffraction pattern, thus require smaller crystals. Generally, single crystals with well-defined faces are optimal, and typically for organic compounds, the crystals need to be larger than those containing heavy atoms. Without viable crystals, X-ray crystallography is not feasible. Some molecules are inherently more crystalline than others, thu


 Organic Chemistry

Contractility Measurements of Human Uterine Smooth Muscle to Aid Drug Development

1Harris-Wellbeing Preterm Birth Research Centre, Department of Cellular and Molecular Physiology, Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, 2School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Queensland, 3Faculty of Chemistry, Institute of Biological Chemistry, University of Vienna, 4Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, 5Center for Physiology and Pharmacology, Medical University of Vienna

JoVE 56639


 Medicine

Using RNA-sequencing to Detect Novel Splice Variants Related to Drug Resistance in In Vitro Cancer Models

1Department of Pediatric Oncology/Hematology, VU University Medical Center, 2Department of Hematology, VU University Medical Center, 3Department of Medical Oncology, VU University Medical Center, 4Department of Clinical Genetics, VU University Medical Center, 5Division of General and Transplant Surgery, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Pisana, Universita’ di Pisa, 6Amsterdam Immunology and Rheumatology Center, VU University Medical Center, 7Princess Máxima Center for Pediatric Oncology, 8Cancer Pharmacology Lab, AIRC Start-Up Unit, University of Pisa, 9Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, CNR-Nano

JoVE 54714


 Cancer Research

Structure Of Ferrocene

JoVE 10347

Source: Tamara M. Powers, Department of Chemistry, Texas A&M University 

In 1951, Kealy and Pauson reported to Nature the synthesis of a new organometallic compound, ferrocene.1 In their original report, Pauson suggested a structure for ferrocene in which the iron is singly bonded (sigma bonds) to one carbon atom of each cyclopentadiene ligand (Figure 1, Structure I).1,2,3 This initial report led to wide-spread interest in the structure of ferrocene, and many leading scientists participated in the structure elucidation of this interesting new molecule. Wilkinson and Woodward were quick to suggest an alternative formulization where the iron is "sandwiched" between two cyclopentadiene ligands, with equal binding to all 10 carbon atoms (Figure 1, Structure II).4 Here, we will synthesize ferrocene and decide, based on experimental data (IR and 1H NMR), which of these structures is observed. In addition, we will study the electrochemistry of ferrocene by collecting a cyclic voltammogram. In the course of this experiment, we introduce the 18-electron rule and discuss valence electron counting for transitio


 Inorganic Chemistry

Multi-target Parallel Processing Approach for Gene-to-structure Determination of the Influenza Polymerase PB2 Subunit

1Protein Crystallization Lab, Emerald Bio, 2Molecular Biology Lab, Emerald Bio, 3Scientific Sales Representative, Emerald Bio, 4Group Leader II, Emerald Bio, 5Group Leader I, Emerald Bio, 6Chair of Advisory Board, Emerald Bio, 7Director of Multi-Target Services, Emerald Bio, 8Senior Project Leader, Emerald Bio, 9Project Leader II & SSGCID Site Manager, Emerald Bio

JoVE 4225


 Immunology and Infection

Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Based Developmental Toxicity Assays for Chemical Safety Screening and Systems Biology Data Generation

1Center of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Institute of Neurophysiology, University of Cologne, 2Department of Biology, University of Konstanz, 3Department of Statistics, Technical University of Dortmund, 4Leibniz Research Centre for Working Environment and Human Factors, Technical University of Dortmund

JoVE 52333


 Developmental Biology

Flow Cytometric Detection of Newly-Formed Breast Cancer Stem Cell-like Cells After Apoptosis Reversal

1School of Life Sciences, Chinese University of Hong Kong, 2State Key Laboratory of Agrobiotechnology, Chinese University of Hong Kong, 3Key Laboratory for Regenerative Medicine, Ministry of Education, Chinese University of Hong Kong, 4Centre for Novel Biomaterials, Chinese University of Hong Kong

Video Coming Soon

JoVE 58642


 JoVE In-Press

Digital Analysis of Immunostaining of ZW10 Interacting Protein in Human Lung Tissues

1Department of Hematology, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, 2Department of Thoracic Surgery, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, 3Department of Human Anatomy, Histology and Embryology, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, School of Basic Medicine, Peking Union Medical College, 4Department of Immunology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Wuhan University, 5Department of Gastroenterology, Central Hospital of Wuhan, 6Department of Transfusion, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University

Video Coming Soon

JoVE 58551


 JoVE In-Press

Polyethyleneimine-coated Iron Oxide Nanoparticles As a Vehicle for the Delivery of Small Interfering RNA to Macrophages In Vitro and In Vivo

1Key Laboratory of Ministry of Education for Developmental Genes & Human Diseases, Institute of Life Sciences, Southeast University, 2State Key Laboratory of Bioelectronics, Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Biomaterials & Devices, School of Biological Science & Medical Engineering, Southeast University, 3Key Laboratory of Ministry of Education for Developmental Genes & Human Diseases, Medical School, Southeast University

Video Coming Soon

JoVE 58660


 JoVE In-Press

Measuring and Interpreting Oxygen Consumption Rates in Whole Fly Head Segments

1Munich Center of Integrated Protein Science and Biomedical Center, Ludwig-Maximilians University of Munich, 2Laboratory for Metabolism and Epigenetics in Aging, Leibniz Institute for Farm Animal Biology (FBN), 3German Mouse Clinic, Helmholtz Zentrum Munich, German Research Center for Environment and Health (GmbH), 4German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD), 5Chair of Experimental Genetics, School of Life Science Weihenstephan, Technische Universität München, 6Laboratory for Metabolism and Epigenetics in Brain Aging, Institute of Neuroregeneration & Neurorehabilitation of Qingdao University, 7Molecular Biology Division, Biomedical Center, Faculty of Medicine, Ludwig-Maximilians University of Munich

Video Coming Soon

JoVE 58601


 JoVE In-Press

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