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Epithelial Cells: Cells that line the inner and outer surfaces of the body by forming cellular layers (Epithelium) or masses. Epithelial cells lining the Skin; the Mouth; the Nose; and the Anal canal derive from ectoderm; those lining the Respiratory system and the Digestive system derive from endoderm; others (Cardiovascular system and Lymphatic system) from mesoderm.

Tissues

JoVE 10696

Cells with similar structure and function are grouped into tissues. A group of tissues with a specialized function is called an organ. There are four main types of tissue in vertebrates: epithelial, connective, muscle, and nervous.

Epithelial tissue consists of thin sheets of cells and includes the skin and the linings of internal organs and body cavities. Epithelial cells are tightly packed, providing a barrier against injury, infection, and water loss. Epithelial tissue can be a single layer called simple epithelium, or multiple layers called stratified epithelium. In stratified epithelium, such as the skin, the outer cells—which are subject to damage—are replaced through the division of cells underneath. Epithelial cells have a variety of shapes, including squamous (flattened), cuboid, and columnar. Some epithelial tissues absorb or secrete substances, such as the lining of the intestines. Connective tissue is composed of cells within an extracellular matrix and includes loose connective tissue, fibrous connective tissue, adipose (fat) tissue, cartilage, bone, and blood. Although the characteristics of connective tissue vary greatly, their general function is to support and attach multiple tissues. For example, tendons are made of fibrous connective tissue and attach muscle to bone. Blood transports oxygen, nutrients and waste produ

 Core: Cell Structure and Function

Isolation of Myeloid Dendritic Cells and Epithelial Cells from Human Thymus

1Department of General Neurology, Hertie Institute for Clinical Brain Research, 2Institute of Pharmacology, University of Bern, 3Department of Immunology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, 4Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, University Clinic Tuebingen, 5Department of Neurology, University Hospital Erlangen

JoVE 50951

 Immunology and Infection

Whole-cell Patch-clamp Recordings of Isolated Primary Epithelial Cells from the Epididymis

1School of Life Science and Technology, ShanghaiTech University, 2Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 3University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 4Shanghai Institute for Advanced Immunochemical Studies, ShanghaiTech University

JoVE 55700

 Developmental Biology

Induction of Mesenchymal-Epithelial Transitions in Sarcoma Cells

1Department of Medicine, Duke University, 2Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, 3Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, Duke University, 4Solid Tumor Program and the Duke Prostate Center, Duke University Medical Center, 5Duke University Medical Center

JoVE 55520

 Developmental Biology

What is Monogastric Digestion?

JoVE 10829

The human body contains a monogastric digestive system. In a monogastric digestive system, the stomach only contains one chamber in which it digests food. Several other animal species also have monogastric digestive systems, including pigs, horses, dogs, and birds. This chapter, however, focuses on the human digestive system.

Saliva is a watery substance secreted by the salivary glands into the mouth. Human saliva contains 99.5% water with electrolytes, mucus, white blood cells, epithelial cells, enzymes, and antimicrobial agents. The enzymes found in saliva are essential in beginning the process of digestion. They also play a role in breaking down food particles trapped around the teeth, protecting them from decay. Saliva is obtained easily, inexpensively, and non-invasively from patients which spurs research interest. Ongoing research identified novel ways of using saliva in molecular diagnostics. DNA, RNA, and proteins found in saliva serve as useful sources of diagnostic information in the early detection of various cancers including oral, pancreatic, and gastric cancer. The primary component of gastric acid is hydrochloric acid. Hydrogen and chloride ions released by parietal cells lining the stomach react in the stomach cavity to form hydrochloric acid. Parietal cells are coupled to feedback systems that increase and decrease acid prod

 Core: Nutrition and Digestion

DNA Isolation and Restriction Enzyme Analysis- Concept

JoVE 10628

The revelation of DNA as the hereditary molecule in all organisms has led to enormous scientific and medical breakthroughs and significantly enhanced our understanding of ourselves and other organisms. DNA isolation and profiling have been the fundamental first steps for many of the advancements in the past century; from identification of gene function, to revolutions of agriculture and…

 Lab Bio

Osmoregulation in Insects

JoVE 10990

Malpighian tubules are specialized structures found in the digestive systems of many arthropods, including most insects, which handle excretion and osmoregulation. The tubules are typically arranged in pairs and have a convoluted structure that increases their surface area.

Malpighian tubules extend from the digestive tract, typically the area between the midgut and hindgut, into the hemolymph—a mixture of blood and interstitial fluid found in insects and other arthropods, as well as most mollusks. Unlike other excretory systems, the excretory processes of Malpighian tubules lack a filtration step. Metabolic wastes, like uric acid, diffuse into the tubules from the hemolymph. The tubules are lined with a layer of transport epithelia. These specialized epithelial cells contain pumps that actively transport ions, like sodium (Na+) and potassium (K+), from the hemolymph into the interior of the tubule, called the lumen. Osmosis allows water to follow ions into the tubules passively. From the tubule lumen, water, ions, and waste travel from the intestine to the rectum. Tiny, protruding microvilli lining the inside of the tubules help maximize solute-water coupling and the propulsion of uric acid crystals through the tubules. In the rectum, specialized glands pump many of the ions back into the hemolymph. Osmosis

 Core: Regulation and Excretion

Anatomy of the Intestines

JoVE 10830

Although digestion of proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids may begin in the stomach, it is completed in the intestine. The absorption of nutrients, water, and electrolytes from food and drink also occur in the intestine. The intestines can be divided into two structurally distinct organs—the small and large intestines.

The small intestine is an ~22 meter-long tube with an inner diameter of just 2.5 cm. Since most nutrients are absorbed here, the inner lining of the small intestine is highly convoluted and covered in finger-like extensions called villi, each containing hundreds of microvilli. The folds, villi, and microvilli of the small intestine amplify the surface area of absorption 60 to 120 times. The increased surface area provides ample opportunity for nutrients to be absorbed. The small intestine connects to the stomach by the pyloric sphincter, which closes off when chyme moves into the duodenum—the beginning of the small intestine. The middle and largest part of the small intestine is the jejunum. The ileum ends the small intestine, where it attaches to the large intestine by the ileocecal valve. The large intestine starts at the cecum. The appendix, a small lymphatic structure, dangles from the bottom of the cecum. Above the cecum, starts the ascending colon followed by the transverse colon. They absorb most of the remaining

 Core: Nutrition and Digestion

Time-lapse Imaging of Primary Preneoplastic Mammary Epithelial Cells Derived from Genetically Engineered Mouse Models of Breast Cancer

1Department of Oncology, Georgetown University, 2Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, 3Stem Cell Dynamics, Helmholtz Zentrum München - German Research Center for Environmental Health, 4Department of Medicine, Georgetown University, 5Department of Nanobiomedical Science and WCU Research Center of Nanobiomedical Science, Dankook University

JoVE 50198

 Medicine

The Transwell Migration Assay

JoVE 5644

Cells migration in response to chemical cues is crucial to development, immunity and disease states such as cancer. To quantify cell migration, a simple assay was developed in 1961 by Dr. Stephen Boyden, which is now known as the transwell migration assay or Boyden chamber assay. This set-up consists an insert which separates the wells of a multiwell plate into top and…

 Cell Biology

Contact-dependent Signaling

JoVE 10715

Contact-dependent signaling uses specialized cytoplasmic channels between cells that allow the flow of small molecules between them. In animal cells, these channels are called gap junctions. In plants, they are known as plasmodesmata.

Gap junctions form when two hemichannels, or connexons, join; one connexon from one cell coupling to a connexon of an adjacent cell. Each cell’s connexon is formed from six proteins creating a circular channel. There are over 20 different types of these proteins, or connexins, so there is substantial variation in how they come together as connexons and as gap junctions. Connexins have four transmembrane subunits with both their N- and C-terminus endings located intracellularly. The C-terminus has multiple phosphorylation sites so it can be activated by numerous different kinases- further adding to gap junction variety. Depending on the activating kinase, and the C-terminal amino acid residues of connexins that are phosphorylated, gap junctions can be partially or fully opened. This selectively allows small molecules to flow from one cell into another. A gap junction may also exclude by electrochemical charge. The selectivity of gap junctions allows a single cell to coordinate a complex multicellular response. However, some toxic molecules, matching the size and electrochemical preference of the gap junction, can also p

 Core: Cell Signaling

An Introduction to Cell Motility and Migration

JoVE 5643

Cell motility and migration play important roles in both normal biology and in disease. On one hand, migration allows cells to generate complex tissues and organs during development, but on the other hand, the same mechanisms are used by tumor cells to move and spread in a process known as cancer metastasis. One of the primary cellular machineries that make cell movement…

 Cell Biology

Fundamentals of Breeding and Weaning

JoVE 10293

Source: Kay Stewart, RVT, RLATG, CMAR; Valerie A. Schroeder, RVT, RLATG. University of Notre Dame, IN


Millions of mice and rats are bred for use in biomedical research each year. Worldwide, there are several large commercial breeding facilities that supply mice to research laboratories, but many facilities choose to also breed mice and…

 Lab Animal Research

C. elegans Development and Reproduction

JoVE 5110

Ceanorhabditis elegans is a powerful tool to help understand how organisms develop from a single cell into a vast interconnected array of functioning tissues. Early work in C. elegans traced the complete cell lineage and structure at the electron microscopy level, allowing researchers unprecedented insight into the connection between genes, development and disease. …

 Biology I

An Introduction to Molecular Developmental Biology

JoVE 5328

Molecular signals play a major role in the complex processes occurring during embryonic development. These signals regulate activities such as cell differentiation and migration, which contribute to the formation of specific cell types and structures. The use of molecular approaches allows researchers to investigate these physical and chemical mechanisms in detail.


This video will …

 Developmental Biology

Epithelial Cell Repopulation and Preparation of Rodent Extracellular Matrix Scaffolds for Renal Tissue Development

1Comprehensive Transplant Center, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, 2Department of Surgery, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, 3Department of Biomedical Engineering, Northwestern University, 4Simpson Querrey Institute for BioNanotechnology in Medicine, Northwestern University, 5Department of Internal Medicine, University of New Mexico HSC, 6Department of Pathology, University of New Mexico HSC, 7Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Northwestern University, 8Chemistry of Life Processes Institute, Northwestern University, 9Department of Surgery, Jesse Brown VA Medical Center

JoVE 53271

 Bioengineering

Multimodal Quantitative Phase Imaging with Digital Holographic Microscopy Accurately Assesses Intestinal Inflammation and Epithelial Wound Healing

1Department of Medicine B, University Hospital Münster, 2Institute of Palliative Care, University Hospital Münster, 3Biomedical Technology Center, University of Münster, 4Department of Gastroenterology, Klinikum Bielefeld

JoVE 54460

 Medicine

High Throughput Traction Force Microscopy Using PDMS Reveals Dose-Dependent Effects of Transforming Growth Factor-β on the Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition

1Department of Bioengineering, McGill University, 2Goodman Cancer Research Centre, McGill University, 3Department of Medicine, McGill University, 4Department of Emergency Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

JoVE 59364

 Bioengineering

Analyzing Beneficial Effects of Nutritional Supplements on Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Functions During Experimental Colitis

1Department of Molecular Biomedicine, Center for Research and Advanced Studies of the National Polytechnic Institute, 2Department of Physiology, Biophysics and Neurosciences, Center for Research and Advanced Studies of the National Polytechnic Institute, 3Department of Infectomics and Molecular Pathogenesis, Center for Research and Advanced Studies of the National Polytechnic Institute

JoVE 55095

 Medicine

Identification of Intracellular Signaling Events Induced in Viable Cells by Interaction with Neighboring Cells Undergoing Apoptotic Cell Death

1Section of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, 2Section of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, Jesse Brown Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 3Department of Biology, Kutztown University of Pennsylvania, 4Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, 5Department of Microbiology & Immunology, University of Illinois at Chicago

JoVE 54980

 Biology

Isolation of Enteric Glial Cells from the Submucosa and Lamina Propria of the Adult Mouse

1Department of Internal Medicine-Gastroenterology, University of Michigan, 2Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology, University of Michigan, 3Department of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology, University of Michigan, 4Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangxi Medical University, 5Division of Gastroenterology, University of Arizona College of Medicine

JoVE 57629

 Biology

A Cell-based Assay to Investigate Non-muscle Myosin II Contractility via the Folded-gastrulation Signaling Pathway in Drosophila S2R+ Cells

1Department of Biology, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2Department of Biology, Reed College, 3Carolina Center for Genome Sciences, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 4Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

JoVE 58325

 Developmental Biology

In Vitro Colony Assays for Characterizing Tri-potent Progenitor Cells Isolated from the Adult Murine Pancreas

1Diabetes and Metabolism Research Institute, Beckman Research Institute of City of Hope, 2Irell & Manella Graduate School of Biological Sciences, Beckman Research Institute of City of Hope, 3Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology

JoVE 54016

 Developmental Biology

A Multi-well Format Polyacrylamide-based Assay for Studying the Effect of Extracellular Matrix Stiffness on the Bacterial Infection of Adherent Cells

1Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University School of Medicine, 2Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California San Diego, 3Departments of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Immunology and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine

JoVE 57361

 Immunology and Infection

Investigating the Effects of Probiotics on Pneumococcal Colonization Using an In Vitro Adherence Assay

1Pneumococcal Research, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, 2Allergy & Immune Disorders, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, 3Department of Otolaryngology, The University of Melbourne, 4Department of Microbiology & Immunology at the Peter Doherty Institute for Infection & Immunity, The University of Melbourne

JoVE 51069

 Immunology and Infection

Induction of Paralysis and Visual System Injury in Mice by T Cells Specific for Neuromyelitis Optica Autoantigen Aquaporin-4

1Department of Neurology, University of California, 2Program in Immunology, University of California, 3Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Stanford University, 4Department of Pathology, Stanford University

JoVE 56185

 Immunology and Infection

Reprogramming Primary Amniotic Fluid and Membrane Cells to Pluripotency in Xeno-free Conditions

1Mitchell Cancer Institute, University of South Alabama, 2College of Medicine, University of South Alabama, 3Institute for Regenerative Medicine, University of Zurich, 4Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Zurich, 5Center for Applied Biotechnology and Molecular Medicine (CABMM), University of Zurich - Irchel Campus

JoVE 56003

 Developmental Biology
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