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Equipment and Supplies: Expendable and nonexpendable equipment, supplies, apparatus, and instruments that are used in diagnostic, surgical, therapeutic, scientific, and experimental procedures.
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 JoVE In-Press

Murine Aortic Crush Injury - an Efficient In Vivo Model of Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation and Endothelial Function

1Department of Surgery, Baltimore Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 2Department of Surgery, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 3Department of Physiology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 4Center for Vascular and Inflammatory Diseases, University of Maryland School of Medicine

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JoVE 55201

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 JoVE Biology

Removal of Exogenous Materials from the Outer Portion of Frozen Cores to Investigate the Ancient Biological Communities Harbored Inside

1Biogeochemical Sciences Branch, Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory, US Army Engineer Research & Development Center, Hanover, NH, 2Environmental Processes Branch, Environmental Laboratory, US Army Engineer Research & Development Center, Vicksburg, MS, 3Terrestrial and Cryospheric Scienes Branch, Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory, US Army Engineer Research & Development Center, Hanover, NH, 4Biogeochemical Sciences Branch, Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory, US Army Engineer Research & Development Center, Fairbanks, AK


JoVE 54091

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 Science Education: Inactive Collection

Preparing and Administering Enteric Tube Medications

JoVE Science Education

Source: Madeline Lassche, MSNEd, RN and Katie Baraki, MSN, RN, College of Nursing, University of Utah, UT

An enteric tube is a tube that is inserted and passed into the stomach or intestines. Enteric tubes serve multiple purposes, including stomach decompression (through the removal of air, gastric contents, and secretions), enteric feeding, and/or the administration of medications or oral contrast. Enteric tubes are indicated for patients with impaired swallowing and for patients with neurological or other conditions associated with an increased risk of aspiration, or when the patient is unable to maintain adequate oral intake of fluid or calories. There are multiple types of enteric tubes, with their generic names assigned according to the insertion site and the gastrointestinal termination point. For instance, one of the common tube types is the nasogastric tube, which is inserted through a nostril and passed along the upper gastrointestinal tract into the stomach. When administering medications through an enteric tube, it is important to ensure that the tube terminates in the intended gastrointestinal location. When enteric tubes are initially placed, the position of the tube is verified by X-ray. However, due to gastric peristalsis, enteric tubes may migrate out of their intended

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 Science Education: Inactive Collection

Central Venous Access Device Dressing Change

JoVE Science Education

Source: Madeline Lassche, MSNEd, RN and Katie Baraki, MSN, RN, College of Nursing, University of Utah, UT

Central venous access devices (CVAD), commonly known as central lines or central catheters, are large-bore intravenous (IV) catheters that are introduced into the central circulation. Typically, CVADs terminate in the superior vena cava, just outside of the right atrium of the heart, but they may also terminate in any one of the great veins (i.e., aorta, inferior vena cava, brachiocephalic vein, pulmonary artery, internal iliac vein, or common femoral vein). Patients may need a CVAD for any number of reasons. CVADs allow for the rapid infusion of fluids to treat significant hypovolemia or shock. They are also beneficial when administering vasoactive medications, highly concentrated medications, total parenteral nutrition (TPN), or chemotherapy, because the increased blood volume in these areas allows for the hemodilution of these potentially caustic or reactive agents. Patients who must receive multiple non-compatible IV medications, those that require long-term IV medications, or those with limited vascular access may also require the placement of a CVAD. These devices may be tunneled (i.e., inserted into a vein at one location and tunneled under the skin to emerge through the skin at another site)

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 Science Education: Essentials of Lab Animal Research

Basic Care Procedures

JoVE Science Education

Source: Kay Stewart, RVT, RLATG, CMAR; Valerie A. Schroeder, RVT, RLATG. University of Notre Dame, IN

Mice and rats account for over 90% of the animals used for biomedical research. The proper care of these research animals is critical to the outcome of experiments. There are general procedures that apply to the majority of these mice and rats, but some of the animals, such as the immunocompromised ones, require additional steps to be taken to sustain them for experimentation. Commonly used immunocompromised mice include those that have naturally occurred in inbred mice and those that have been created through genetic engineering. The first immunocompromised mice used in research were "nude" mice. The BALB/c Nude (nu) mouse was discovered in 1966, within a BALB/c colony that was producing mice lacking both hair and a thymus. These athymic mice have an inhibited immune system that is devoid of T cells. The value of this animal was soon discovered for the use in studies of microbial infections, immune deficiencies, and autoimmunity. Although not as commonly used as the nude mouse, there is also a nude rat. The nude rat is T cell deficient and shows depleted cell populations in thymus-dependent areas of peripheral lymphoid organs. Another naturally occurring immune deficient mouse is the severe comb

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 Science Education: Essentials of Emergency Medicine and Critical Care

Percutaneous Cricothyrotomy

JoVE Science Education

Source: James W Bonz, MD, Emergency Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, USA

A surgical airway procedure is indicated when other forms of endotracheal intubation have failed and ventilation is worsening or not possible. This is the feared "can't intubate, can't ventilate" scenario, and in the emergency setting, cricothyrotomy is the surgical procedure of choice. Cricothyrotomy is preferred over tracheotomy because of the lower risk of complications, the predictable anatomy of the cricothyroid membrane, and the comparative rapidity with which the procedure can be performed—even by less experienced practitioners. Cricothyrotomy traditionally has been done in an "open" form; however, percutaneous cricothyrotomy using standard Seldinger technique has been advanced as a more successful approach when identification of the relevant anatomic landmarks is more difficult. Seldinger technique involves the introduction of a device into the body through the use of an introducer needle and a guide wire. The needle is used to locate the target; a guide wire is then fed through the thin-walled needle into the target, acting as a "placeholder" for the device, which is fed over the guide wire and into the target. In the cas

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 JoVE Medicine

Evaluation of Cancer Stem Cell Migration Using Compartmentalizing Microfluidic Devices and Live Cell Imaging

1Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2Materials Science Program, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 3Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 4Carbone Comprehensive Cancer Center and Center for Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison


JoVE 3297

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 JoVE Medicine

Heterotopic Renal Autotransplantation in a Porcine Model: A Step-by-Step Protocol

1Multi Organ Transplant Program, Department of Surgery, Toronto General Hospital, 2Division of Nephrology, The Hospital for Sick Children, 3Programa de Doctorat en Medicina, La Universitat Autónoma de Barcelona, 4Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, Toronto General Hospital, 5Department of Medicine, Toronto General Hospital, 6Departments of Surgery (Urology) & Physiology, Developmental & Stem Cell Biology, The Hospital for Sick Children


JoVE 53765

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 JoVE In-Press

Creation and Transplantation of an Adipose-derived Stem Cell (ASC) Sheet in a Diabetic Wound-healing Model

1Diabetic Center, Tokyo Women's Medical University School of Medicine, 2The Institute of Advanced Biomedical Engineering and Science, Tokyo Women's Medical University, 3The Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, Tokyo Women's Medical University School of Medicine

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JoVE 54539

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 JoVE Medicine

The Goeckerman Regimen for the Treatment of Moderate to Severe Psoriasis

1Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, 2Psoriasis and Skin Treatment Center Dermatology, University of California, San Francisco, 3University of California Irvine School of Medicine, 4University of Arizona College of Medicine, 5Chicago College of Osteopathic Medicine


JoVE 50509

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 Science Education: Essentials of Emergency Medicine and Critical Care

Peripheral Venous Cannulation

JoVE Science Education

Source: Sharon Bord, MD, Department of Emergency Medicine, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Maryland, USA

Placement of an intravenous (IV) catheter is one of the key procedures in medicine. The IV catheter allows patients to receive critical medications, including pain medicine, insulin, antibiotics, blood products, and fluids for rehydration. Additionally, placing an IV catheter allows for blood samples to be obtained, which can be sent to the laboratory for testing and evaluation. A majority of peripheral IV lines are placed in the superficially located veins of the upper extremities. IV catheters can be placed in any superficial vein from the upper arm to the hand (though the veins in the antecubital fossa are larger than those in the hand). IV catheters can be placed in the lower extremities as well; however, this procedure should be performed with caution in patients with a history of diabetes or poor peripheral circulation.

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 JoVE Biology

Protocols for Implementing an Escherichia coli Based TX-TL Cell-Free Expression System for Synthetic Biology

1Department of Biology, California Institute of Technology, 2Department of Bioengineering, California Institute of Technology, 3Synthetic Biology Center, Department of Bioengineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 4School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota


JoVE 50762

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 Science Education: Essentials of Emergency Medicine and Critical Care

Central Venous Catheter Insertion: Internal Jugular

JoVE Science Education

Source: James W Bonz, MD, Emergency Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, USA

Central venous access is necessary in a multitude of clinical situations, including vascular access, vasopressor and caustic medication delivery, central venous pressure monitoring, intravascular device delivery (pacing wires, Swann-Ganz catheters), volume resuscitation, total parental nutrition, hemodialysis, and frequent phlebotomy. Safe reliable placement of a central venous catheter (CVC) in the internal jugular (IJ) vein using ultrasound guidance has become the standard of care. It is therefore imperative to understand the anatomy, the relationship between the IJ and the carotid artery, and their appearance on ultrasound. It is also necessary to have the psychomotor skills of vessel cannulation under ultrasound guidance. Seldinger technique is an introduction of a device into the body over a guide wire, which is inserted through a thin-walled needle. In the case of CVC insertion, the device is an intravascular catheter and the target vessel is a central vein. First, the target vessel is cannulated with an 18 gauge thin-walled needle. A guide wire is then passed thought the needle until it is appropriately positioned within the vessel. The needle is removed,

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 JoVE Bioengineering

Rapid and Low-cost Prototyping of Medical Devices Using 3D Printed Molds for Liquid Injection Molding

1Department of Bioengineering & Therapeutic Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, 2Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, 3Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California


JoVE 51745

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