Show Advanced Search

REFINE YOUR SEARCH:

Containing Text
- - -
+
Filter by author or institution
GO
Filter by publication date
From:
October, 2006
Until:
Today
Filter by journal section

Filter by science education

 
 
Fallopian Tubes: A pair of highly specialized muscular canals extending from the Uterus to its corresponding Ovary. They provide the means for Ovum collection, and the site for the final maturation of gametes and Fertilization. The fallopian tube consists of an interstitium, an isthmus, an ampulla, an infundibulum, and fimbriae. Its wall consists of three histologic layers: serous, muscular, and an internal mucosal layer lined with both ciliated and secretory cells.

In Vivo and Ex Vivo Approaches to Study Ovarian Cancer Metastatic Colonization of Milky Spot Structures in Peritoneal Adipose

1Section of Urology, Department of Surgery, The University of Chicago, 2Department of Pathology, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, 3Campbell Family Institute for Breast Cancer Research, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, 4Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, Campbell Family Institute for Breast Cancer Research, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, University Health Network, 5Departments of Medicine, Pharmacology, and Cancer Biology, Duke University Medical Center

JoVE 52721


 Medicine

Tubal Cytology of the Fallopian Tube as a Promising Tool for Ovarian Cancer Early Detection

1Department of Pathology, University of Arizona College of Medicine, 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Henan Provincial People's Hospital, 3Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Arizona College of Medicine, 4University of Arizona Cancer Center, 5Department of Pathology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, 6Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center

JoVE 55887


 Medicine

Diagnostic Necropsy and Tissue Harvest

JoVE 10294

Source: Kay Stewart, RVT, RLATG, CMAR; Valerie A. Schroeder, RVT, RLATG. University of Notre Dame, IN

Many animal experiments rely on final data collection time points that are gathered from the harvesting and testing of organs and tissues. The use of appropriate methods for the collection of organs and tissues can impact the quality of the samples and the analysis of the data that is gleaned for the testing of the tissues. The method of euthanasia of the animal can also impact the quality of the samples. This manuscript will outline proper necropsy techniques for rats.


 Lab Animal Research

Sterile Tissue Harvest

JoVE 10298

Source: Kay Stewart, RVT, RLATG, CMAR; Valerie A. Schroeder, RVT, RLATG. University of Notre Dame, IN

In 1959 The 3 R's were introduced by W.M.S. Russell and R.L. Burch in their book The Principles of Humane Experimental Technique. The 3 R's are replacement, reduction, and refinement of the use of animals in research.1 The use of cell lines and tissue cultures that originated from research animals is a replacement technique, as it allows for many experiments to be conducted in vitro. Harvesting tissues and organs for use in cell and tissue cultures requires aseptic technique to avoid contamination of the tissues. Sterile harvest is also necessary for protein and RNA analysis and metabolic profiling of tissues. This manuscript will discuss the process of sterile organ harvest in rats and mice.


 Lab Animal Research

More Results...