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Femoral Vein: The vein accompanying the femoral artery in the same sheath; it is a continuation of the popliteal vein and becomes the external iliac vein.

Central Venous Catheter Insertion: Femoral Vein

JoVE 10240

Source: James W Bonz, MD, Emergency Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, USA

Central venous access is necessary in a multitude of clinical situations, including vascular access, vasopressor and caustic medication delivery, central venous pressure monitoring, volume resuscitation, total parental nutrition, hemodialysis, and frequent phlebotomy. There are three veins in the body that are accessed for central venous cannulation: the internal jugular, the subclavian, and the femoral. Each of these vessels has distinct advantages and disadvantages with unique anatomical considerations. Femoral vein cannulation can be easily performed both under ultrasound guidance and using the surface landmarks; therefore, femoral access is often used when emergent placement of a central venous catheter (CVC) is needed (such as in the case of medical codes and trauma resuscitations). In addition, cannulation of the femoral artery allows one to simultaneously perform other procedures needed for stabilization, such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and intubation. Successful placement of a femoral CVC requires working understanding of the target anatomy, access to with procedural ultrasound, and fluidity in the Seldinger technique. Seld


 Emergency Medicine and Critical Care

Ultrasound Assessment of Flow-Mediated Dilation of the Brachial and Superficial Femoral Arteries in Rats

1Department of Internal Medicine, University of Utah, 2Department of Kinesiology and Health Education, University of Texas at Austin, 3Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, University of Utah, 4Department of Biochemistry, University of Utah, 5Department of Exercise and Sport Science, University of Utah, 6Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, Department of Veterans Affairs

JoVE 54762


 Medicine

A Model of Free Tissue Transfer: The Rat Epigastric Free Flap

1Anatomy Department, NOVA Medical School, Universidade NOVA de Lisboa, 2Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Department and Burn Unit, Centro Hospitalar de Lisboa Central - Hospital de São José, 3UCIBIO, Life Sciences Department, Faculty of Sciences and Technology, Universidade NOVA de Lisboa, 4CEDOC, NOVA Medical School, Universidade NOVA de Lisboa, 5Physics Department, Faculty of Sciences and Technology, LIBPhys, 6Pathology Department, Centro Hospitalar de Lisboa Central – Hospital de São José

JoVE 55281


 Medicine

Blood Withdrawal II

JoVE 10247

Source: Kay Stewart, RVT, RLATG, CMAR; Valerie A. Schroeder, RVT, RLATG. University of Notre Dame, IN

The collection of blood from mice and rats for analysis can be done through a variety of methods. Each method of collection has variations in the type of restraint required, the invasiveness of the procedure, and the necessity of a general anesthetic.1Historically, the use of the retro-orbital sinus cavity has been used, but not without debate. The controversy related to the potential tissue damage,or even blindness,caused by retro-orbital bleeds has led to the development of facial and submandibular vein bleeding methods in mice.Blood collection from the saphenous vein in both mice and rats is another technique that has been developed. These procedures do not require anesthesia and therefore are suitable when the use of anesthetics may confound blood results or other data.


 Lab Animal Research

Measuring Ascending Aortic Stiffness In Vivo in Mice Using Ultrasound

1Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 2Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, 3Department of Medicine (Cardiology), Johns Hopkins University, 4The Australian School of Advanced Medicine, Macquarie University

JoVE 52200


 Medicine

The Arteriovenous (AV) Loop in a Small Animal Model to Study Angiogenesis and Vascularized Tissue Engineering

1Department of Plastic and Hand Surgery and Laboratory for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, University Hospital of Erlangen, Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), 2Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology Institute for Postgraduate Studies, Baghdad University, 3Department of Plastic, Hand and Microsurgery, Sana Klinikum Hof GmbH

JoVE 54676


 Bioengineering

Benefits of Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy in an Asynchronous Heart Failure Model Induced by Left Bundle Branch Ablation and Rapid Pacing

1Department of Cardiology, Shanghai Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, 2Department of Echocardiography, Shanghai Institute of Medical imaging, Shanghai Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, 3Department of Cardiac surgery, Shanghai Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University

Video Coming Soon

JoVE 56439


 JoVE In-Press

Percutaneous Hepatic Perfusion (PHP) with Melphalan as a Treatment for Unresectable Metastases Confined to the Liver

1Department of Surgery, Leiden University Medical Centre, 2Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Centre, 3Department of Anesthesiology, Leiden University Medical Centre, 4Department of Extracorporeal Circulation, Leiden University Medical Centre, 5Department of Medical Oncology, Leiden University Medical Centre, 6Department of Surgery, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute

JoVE 53795


 Medicine

Vein Interposition Model: A Suitable Model to Study Bypass Graft Patency

1Transplant and Stem Cell Immunobiology Lab, University Heart Center Hamburg, 2Department of Surgery, Transplant and Stem Cell Immunobiology Lab, University of California San Francisco (UCSF), 3Cardiovascular Research Center (CVRC) and DZHK German Center for Cardiovascular Research), partner site Hamburg/Kiel/Luebeck, 4Cardiovascular Surgery, University Heart Center Hamburg

JoVE 54839


 Medicine

Near-infrared Navigation System for Real-time Visualization of Blood Flow in Vascular Grafts

1Department of Radiology, University of Missouri, 2Office of Animal Resources, University of Missouri, 3Bioengineering, University of Missouri, 4Biomedical Science, University of Missouri, 5Surgery - Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, University of Missouri, 6MU-iCATS, University of Missouri, 7Medical Pharmacology and Physiology, University of Missouri

Video Coming Soon

JoVE 54927


 JoVE In-Press

In Vivo Model for Testing Effect of Hypoxia on Tumor Metastasis

1Department of Biochemistry and Molecular & Cellular Biology, Georgetown University Medical Center, 2Department of Nursing, Georgetown University, School of Nursing and Health Studies, 3Department of Human Science, Georgetown University, School of Nursing and Health Studies, 4School of Medicine, Georgetown University Medical Center, 5Department of Pathology and Neuropathology, Medical University of Gdańsk, 6Department of Oncology, Georgetown University Medical Center, 7Department of Pathology, Georgetown University Medical Center

JoVE 54532


 Cancer Research

Combined Intravital Microscopy and Contrast-enhanced Ultrasonography of the Mouse Hindlimb to Study Insulin-induced Vasodilation and Muscle Perfusion

1Laboratory for Physiology, Institute for Cardiovascular Research (ICaR-VU), VU University Medical Center, 2Department of Internal Medicine, Institute for Cardiovascular Research (ICaR-VU), VU University Medical Center

JoVE 54912


 Medicine

Utilizing the Modified T-Maze to Assess Functional Memory Outcomes After Cardiac Arrest

1Department of Neurology, Louisiana State University Health Science Center, 2Department of Cellular Biology and Anatomy, Louisiana State University Health Science Center, 3Department of Neurology, Cerebral Vascular Disease Research Laboratories, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, 4Department of Biomedical Sciences, West Virginia Medicine Osteopathic of School

Video Coming Soon

JoVE 56694


 JoVE In-Press

Use of a Piglet Model for the Study of Anesthetic-induced Developmental Neurotoxicity (AIDN): A Translational Neuroscience Approach

1Department of Anesthesiology, Ohio State University College of Medicine, 2Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Nationwide Children's Hospital, 3Department of Anaesthesia and Critical Care Medicine, University of Toronto, 4Department of Biomedical Sciences, Section of Anatomic Pathology, Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine, 5Department of Pathology and Anatomy, Ohio State University College of Medicine, 6Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Nationwide Children's Hospital

JoVE 55193


 Medicine

A Novel Method: Super-selective Adrenal Venous Sampling

1Department of Radiology, Nerima Hikarigaoka Hospital, 2Department of Uro-Oncology, Saitama Medical University International Medical Center, 3Endocrinology & Diabetes Center, Yokohama Rosai Hospital, 4Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Kanazawa University Graduate School of Medicine, 5Department of Medical Education, School of Medicine, California University of Science and Medicine, 6Department of Pathology, Saitama Medical University International Medical Center, 7Department of Radiology, Yokohama Rosai Hospital

JoVE 55716


 Medicine

A Novel Murine Model of Arteriovenous Fistula Failure: The Surgical Procedure in Detail

1Department of Nephrology, Leiden University Medical Center, 2Einthoven Laboratory for Experimental Vascular Medicine, Leiden University Medical Center, 3Department of Surgery, Leiden University Medical Center, 4Division of Nephrology, University of Cincinnati

JoVE 53294


 Medicine

Basic Surgical Techniques in the Göttingen Minipig: Intubation, Bladder Catheterization, Femoral Vessel Catheterization, and Transcardial Perfusion

1Department of Neurosurgery, Aarhus University Hospital, 2Department of Neurobiology, Institute of Anatomy, Faculty of Health Sciences, Aarhus University, 3Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Centre, Aarhus University Hospital

JoVE 2652


 Medicine

Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension and Assessment of Right Ventricular Function in the Piglet

1Surgical Research Lab, Marie Lannelongue Hospital, 2Department of Pathology, Marie Lannelongue Hospital, 3Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery, Marie Lannelongue Hospital, 4Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, University Hospital of Rennes, 5INSERM U999 Paris-Sud University

JoVE 53133


 Medicine

Intravital Microscopy of Monocyte Homing and Tumor-Related Angiogenesis in a Murine Model of Peripheral Arterial Disease

1Department of Cardiology and Angiology, University of Magdeburg, 2Leibniz Institute for Neurobiology, 3Institute of Molecular and Clinical Immunology, University of Magdeburg, 4Division of Hematology/Oncology, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School

JoVE 56290


 Medicine

Rodent Handling and Restraint Techniques

JoVE 10221

Source: Kay Stewart, RVT, RLATG, CMAR; Valerie A. Schroeder, RVT, RLATG. University of Notre Dame, IN 

It has been demonstrated that even minimal handling of mice and rats is stressful to the animals. Handling for cage changing and other noninvasive procedures causes an increase in heart rate, blood pressure, and other physiological parameters, such as serum corticosterone levels. Fluctuations can continue for up to several hours. The methods of restraint required for injections and blood withdrawals also cause physiological changes that can potentially affect scientific data. Training in the proper handling of mice and rats is required to minimize the effects to the animals.1 Mice and rats can be restrained manually with restraint devices, or with chemical agents. Manual methods and the use of restraint devices are covered in this manuscript. All restraint methods include the process of lifting the animals from their home cage.


 Lab Animal Research

Cardiopulmonary Bypass in a Mouse Model: A Novel Approach

1Department of Cardiothoracic, Transplantation, and Vascular Surgery, Hannover Medical School, 2Department of Hematology, Oncology, Immunology, Rheumatology, and Pulmonology, University Hospital Tuebingen, 3Department of Pneumology, Hannover Medical School

JoVE 56017


 Medicine

Isolated Hepatic Perfusion as a Treatment for Liver Metastases of Uveal Melanoma

1Department of Surgery, Institute of Clinical Sciences, 2Department of Thoracic Surgery, Institute of Clinical Sciences, 3Transplant Institute, Institute of Clinical Sciences, 4Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg

JoVE 52490


 Medicine

A Multicenter MRI Protocol for the Evaluation and Quantification of Deep Vein Thrombosis

1Department of Radiology, Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, 2Cardiovascular Division, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 3Daiichi Sankyo Pharma Development

JoVE 52761


 Medicine

Orthotopic Hind Limb Transplantation in the Mouse

1Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Vascularized Composite Allotransplantation (VCA) Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 2Department of Visceral, Transplant and Thoracic Surgery, Innsbruck Medical University, 3Center for Vascularized Composite Allotransplantation, Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and School of Medicine, 4Department of General, Visceral and Transplant Surgery, Charite Berlin

JoVE 53483


 Medicine

Central Venous Catheter Insertion: Internal Jugular

JoVE 10237

Source: James W Bonz, MD, Emergency Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, USA

Central venous access is necessary in a multitude of clinical situations, including vascular access, vasopressor and caustic medication delivery, central venous pressure monitoring, intravascular device delivery (pacing wires, Swann-Ganz catheters), volume resuscitation, total parental nutrition, hemodialysis, and frequent phlebotomy. Safe reliable placement of a central venous catheter (CVC) in the internal jugular (IJ) vein using ultrasound guidance has become the standard of care. It is therefore imperative to understand the anatomy, the relationship between the IJ and the carotid artery, and their appearance on ultrasound. It is also necessary to have the psychomotor skills of vessel cannulation under ultrasound guidance. Seldinger technique is an introduction of a device into the body over a guide wire, which is inserted through a thin-walled needle. In the case of CVC insertion, the device is an intravascular catheter and the target vessel is a central vein. First, the target vessel is cannulated with an 18 gauge thin-walled needle. A guide wire is then passed thought the needle until it is appropriately positioned within the vessel. The needle is removed,


 Emergency Medicine and Critical Care

Murine Spinotrapezius Model to Assess the Impact of Arteriolar Ligation on Microvascular Function and Remodeling

1Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Virginia, 2Department of Biomedical Engineering, California Polytechnic State University, 3Office of Animal Welfare, University of Virginia, 4Department of Biomedical Engineering & Institute for Computational Medicine, Johns Hopkins University

JoVE 50218


 Medicine

Primary Outcome Assessment in a Pig Model of Acute Myocardial Infarction

1Department of Experimental Cardiology, University Medical Center Utrecht, 2Department of Cardiology, University Medical Center Utrecht, 3Department of Clinical Chemistry and Hematology, University Medical Center Utrecht, 4Interuniversity Cardiology Institutes of the Netherlands (ICIN)

JoVE 54021


 Medicine

Central Venous Catheter Insertion: Subclavian Vein

JoVE 10241

Source: James W Bonz, MD, Emergency Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, USA

Central venous access is necessary in a multitude of clinical situations for hemodynamic monitoring, medication delivery, and blood sampling. There are three veins in the body that are accessed for central venous cannulation: the internal jugular, the subclavian, and the femoral vein. Central venous access via the subclavian vein has several advantages over other possible locations. The subclavian central venous catheter (CVC) placement is associated with lower infection and thrombosis rate than internal jugular and femoral CVC. Subclavian line can be placed quickly using anatomic landmarks and are often performed in trauma settings when cervical collars obliterate the access to the internal jugular (IJ) vein. The most significant disadvantage of the subclavian access is the risk of pneumothorax due to the anatomic proximity to the dome of the lung, which lies just superficial to the subclavian vein. In addition, in the event of an inadvertent arterial puncture, the access to the subclavian artery is impeded by the clavicle, which makes it difficult to effectively compress the vessel. Successful placement of the subclavian CVC requires good working understanding of the tar


 Emergency Medicine and Critical Care

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