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Formic Acids:

Engineering 'Golden' Fluorescence by Selective Pressure Incorporation of Non-Canonical Amino Acids and Protein Analysis by Mass Spectrometry and Fluorescence

1Institute of Chemistry L 1, Department of Biocatalysis, Technical University of Berlin, 2Institute of Chemistry PC 14, Department of Bioenergetics, Technical University of Berlin, 3Institute of Chemistry TC 7, Department of Physical Chemistry/Molecular Material Sciences, Technical University of Berlin

Video Coming Soon

JoVE 57017


 JoVE In-Press

Conducting Miller-Urey Experiments

1School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, 2Earth-Life Science Institute, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 3Institute for Advanced Study, 4Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science Directorate, NASA Johnson Space Center, 5Goddard Center for Astrobiology, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 6Geosciences Research Division, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California at San Diego

JoVE 51039


 Chemistry

Quantification of Proteins Using Peptide Immunoaffinity Enrichment Coupled with Mass Spectrometry

1Clinical Research Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center - FHCRC, 2Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, University of Victoria, 3Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, 4Genome BC Proteomics Centre, University of Victoria, 5Plasma Proteome Institute

JoVE 2812


 Biology

Sample Preparation for Mass Spectrometry-based Identification of RNA-binding Regions

1Epigenetics Institute, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, 2Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, 3Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, 4Graduate Group in Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine

JoVE 56004


 Biochemistry

Quantitative Mass Spectrometric Profiling of Cancer-cell Proteomes Derived From Liquid and Solid Tumors

1Institute of Pathology, University Medical Center, Göttingen, 2Department of Hematology/Oncology, Goethe University of Frankfurt, 3Bioanalytical Mass Spectrometry Group, Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, 4Bioanalytics, Institute of Clinical Chemistry, University Medical Center, Göttingen, 5German Cancer Consortium, 6German Cancer Research Center

JoVE 52435


 Medicine

A Convenient Method for Extraction and Analysis with High-Pressure Liquid Chromatography of Catecholamine Neurotransmitters and Their Metabolites

1School of Public Health of Southeast University, Laboratory of Environment and Biosafety Research Institute of Southeast University in Suzhou, 2Key Laboratory of Child Development and Learning Science (Ministry of Education), School of Biological Science & Medical Engineering, Southeast University, 3School of Public Health, Tianjin Medical University, 4British Columbia Academy, Nanjing Foreign Language School

Video Coming Soon

JoVE 56445


 JoVE In-Press

Proteomics to Identify Proteins Interacting with P2X2 Ligand-Gated Cation Channels

1Department of Physiology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, 2Department of Anesthesiology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, 3Department of Anesthesiology, Medicine and Physiology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles

JoVE 1178


 Biology

Safe Handling of Mineral Acids

JoVE 10370

Source: Robert M. Rioux & Taslima A. Zaman, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA

A mineral acid (or inorganic acid) is defined as a water-soluble acid derived from inorganic minerals by chemical reaction as opposed to organic acids (e.g. acetic acid, formic acid). Examples of mineral acids include: • Boric acid (CAS No.10043-35-3) • Chromic acid (CAS No.1333-82-0) • Hydrochloric acid (CAS No.7647-01-0) • Hydrofluoric acid (CAS No. 7664-39-3) • Nitric acid (CAS No. 7697-37-2) • Perchloric acid (CAS No. 7601-90-3) • Phosphoric acid (CAS No.7664-38-2) • Sulfuric acid (CAS No.7664-93-9) Mineral acids are commonly found in research laboratories and their corrosive nature makes them a significant safety risk. Since they are important reagents in the research laboratory and often do not have substitutes, it is important that they are handled properly and with care. Some acids are even shock sensitive and under certain conditions may cause explosions (i.e., salts of perchloric acid).


 Lab Safety

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